The targeted audience of a work can be placed somewhere on a line between ''broad appeal'' and ''specific appeal.'' Like this:

* ''Broad Appeal'', AKA MultipleDemographicAppeal: Somewhat limited in what can be done before you start alienating a particular audience. Easier to work with and will attract a bigger audience. Consider that the works of WaltDisney and Creator/WilliamShakespeare were made with the general public in mind and you will find an example of how simpler, broader things can be very effective.

* ''Specific Appeal'', AKA [[PeripheryDemographic Periphery Demographic Appeal]]: Has a much higher risk factor in success and less guarantee of profit or a wide audience. Allows more freedom and creativity in what can be done with a product. This pops up all the time with independent, especially non-commercial works.

See some examples of where works fall on this line below.
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!!Examples:

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[[folder:Broad Appeal]]
* MickeyMouse, as well as ClassicDisneyShorts and [[DisneyAnimatedCanon films]], takes this part of the trope and runs with it.
* {{Pixar}} films also fit in here, but are kind enough to toss in some ParentalBonus. Same with Creator/{{Dreamworks}} animated films.
* Creator/CirqueDuSoleil shows. With occasional exceptions such as the non-touring shows ''Zumanity'' (adults only) and ''Theatre/CrissAngelBelieve'' (children under 12 are discouraged from attending), they shoot for MultipleDemographicAppeal in their combination of spectacle, whimsy, broad humor, and daring feats.
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[[folder:Specific Appeal]]
* ''Franchise/StarTrek'', which only appeals to people who like [[ShapedLikeItself Star Trek]].
* Pretty much any film made by Creator/DonBluth...in the 1980s.
[[/folder]]
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