Often when there is some element in a GameShow that is hidden from the contestants' view or knowledge, the home audience will get a "sneak peek" at the gameplay element in question. In some instances, the host will sometimes remind viewers to look away if they are playing along, with an audible indicator to let the viewer know when it is okay to resume watching.

Please note that this is only to reveal a certain key component of gameplay, not all instances of game questions being shown on-screen.
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!!Examples:
* On the first few episodes of ''[[{{Concentration}} Classic Concentration]]'', the rebus solution would be revealed to the audience superimposed over the numbered squares.
** Also, Alex Trebek would often use this exact phrase at the end of a round, saying "Let's show the folks at home how he/she solved the puzzle."
** The Jack Narz version of ''Concentration'' did this with the rebus solutions before the actual rebus was shown in the Double Play BonusRound.
* The price of the items offered in "Clock Game" on ''Series/ThePriceIsRight''. The audience also sees the prices, hence why the host asks for silence (a rarity on ''Price'' as it's one of the few shows that actually allows the audience to help the contestant come up with an answer, if not the only show). This is to avoid helping the contestant in this case, and at least one person had to be escorted out of the audience for failing to comprehend this simple rule.
* The location of the "Stinger" on ''Series/TheOneMillionChanceOfALifetime''.
* The answer to the clues on ''DoubleDare1976''.
* The contestant's secret and the [[CoveredInGunge Secret Slime Action]] on ''Series/FigureItOut''.
* The passwords on the ''Series/{{Password}}'' series.
* The approximate location of the hidden object when a room is searched on the Toffler and [=UK=] versions of ''Series/FindersKeepers''.
* The Power Prize on ''Series/FunHouse''.
* The Secret Square on ''Series/TheHollywoodSquares''.
* The [[BonusSpace Mystery Game]] on ''{{Starcade}}''.
* The identity of the "Red Herring" in the Locker Room during Season 2 of ''Series/ThinkFast''.
* ''Series/WheelOfFortune'': What is hidden behind the "Mystery Wedge" when the wheel landed on it is superimposed over the overhead shot for a few moments while Pat spiels about the decision.
* Possible TropeNamer - John Daly and Garry Moore would actually say the phrase as the contestants' occupations/secrets were revealed on ''[[Series/WhatsMyLine What's My Line?]]'' and ''IveGotASecret''.
* The first contestant's answers in the Fast Money bonus round of ''Series/FamilyFeud''.
* Briefly used on the syndicated ''Series/DealOrNoDeal''.
* On the 1960s ''Camouflage'', a contestant reaching 30 points in score saw a picture of the object she had to locate and trace. The object was similarly shown to the studio and home audiences.
* The names on ''Series/YouDontSay!'' At least once per show, however, the name would be replaced with "Guess Who?" or a set of question marks.
* ''Series/WhoseLineIsItAnyway'' would often include games where the contestant is trying to guess what another contestant is suppose to acting like, with subtitles revealing the answer for viewers at home.[[note]](This actually makes it funnier, as we get to see what ridiculous quirk the performers got, and the sheer hilarity of us seeing the one trying to guess try to get it right when we know.)[[/note]]
* An odd variation occurred during NBC's coverage of the 2012 Summer Olympics where, attempting to mesh live updates with pre-taped and edited footage, they would occasionally flash medal updates on-screen, while the commentator advised those who didn't want to be spoiled to look away. Unfortunately, they usually went ahead and spoiled the results in their promos anyway, but you have to give them something for the effort.
* Parodied on radio quiz ''Radio/ImSorryIHaventAClue'', which [[TakeOurWordForIt tells the listeners]] that the studio audience are seeing the answer on the "Laser Display Board", but really uses a runner with a bit of card. For the Folks At Home themselves, there's a "Mystery Voice".
* Starting in 1999, televised poker events made use of a "pocket cam" to get a peek at the players' face-down cards for the benefit of TV viewers.
* In ''Series/BargainHunt'' the viewers at home will get a sneak peak at what the auctioneer thinks of the items the teams bought, and more importantly what the auctioneer thinks of the expert's "bonus item" that the team may or may not go with. Usually this is the auctioneer saying just exactly how badly the item in question is going to do.
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