[[quoteright:239:[[VideoGame/{{Raiden}} http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/raiden4-shmups.jpg]]]]
->''"Sometime in the future, Earth will be menaced by hordes of alien spacecraft that fly in [[ArtificialStupidity predictable patterns]] and can be killed in {{one hit|PointWonder}}. The logical course of action will be to dispatch [[OneManArmy one brave hero]] in an [[SuperPrototype untested plane/tank/spaceship]] to take them all on [[ItsUpToYou without help]]."''
-->-- '''Games Radar''', "101 things we've learned from games"

A classic staple of TheGoldenAgeOfVideoGames that has fallen out of favor in recent years. [[EverythingTryingToKillYou Everything is trying to kill you]], and you have [[BottomlessMagazines unlimited ammunition]] and a license to shoot first and ask questions later. Frequently, you're flying a spaceship or some other small craft, but other examples of the genre involve abstract shapes, people walking around with guns or bows and arrows, and so forth.

So popular were shoot 'em ups (and their close-combat cousin the BeatEmUp) that many computer games magazines of the mid-late 80s took to jokingly appending "'em up" to whatever genre of game they were reviewing -- [[PuzzleGame puzzle 'em ups]], [[PlatformGame platform 'em ups]], quiz 'em ups and so on.

The term ''shmup'' is an abbreviation of "shoot 'em up", but is typically used by the fans who coined it to refer specifically to fixed-scrolling shooters that are not three-dimensional. For instance, ''[[NineteenFortyTwo 1943]]'' would fit this description, whereas ''VideoGame/GeometryWars'' would not (it is free-scrolling according to player movement), and neither would ''AfterBurner'' (it scrolls into/out of the screen in 3D). This kind of restrictive use is, however, debated among shoot 'em up fans.

{{Power Up}}s typically increase the power and spread pattern of the primary weapon, which is usually fired continuously from the start of play until the end. Usually, a limited number of screen-clearing {{Smart Bomb}}s are included to get the player out of a jam in a hurry. Many later games end their levels with a giant BossBattle.

The actual shooting part can vary in complexity. It can be as simple as holding down the fire button and never letting go or it can be more complex either due to ship's low firepower (e.g. ''VideoGame/SpaceInvaders'') , scoring systems required to watch what and when to shoot (e.g. ''VideoGame/RadiantSilvergun'') or other reasons.

The UrExample is quite possibly ''[[VideoGame/{{Spacewar}} Spacewar!]]'' (although it's more of a one-on-one shooter rather than a shoot 'em up), the TropeMaker is ''VideoGame/SpaceInvaders,'' and the TropeCodifier is ''VideoGame/{{Galaga}}''.

Like a platform game, shoot 'em ups have become popular with amateur game developers for their relative ease of development. While very few professional examples of the genre have been developed recently -- for example ''[[VideoGame/{{Gradius}} Gradius V]]'', [[Creator/{{Treasure}} which wasn't developed by series creator]] {{Konami}}[[note]](although the company that worked on ''Gradius V'' was founded by former Konami employees)[[/note]].

Today, shoot 'em ups in general suffer from terminal ItsShortSoItSucks-itis from many critics. Worsening the decline is the redefinition of the term "shooter" -- no longer used to refer to shoot-em-ups, they now refer to the distantly-related FirstPersonShooter genre, or (merely) closer-related ThirdPersonShooter.

''WebOriginal/LifeInAGame'' spoofs them, specifically ''VideoGame/StarFox'', in [[http://www.lifeinagame.com/pages/episode42.html Episode 4-2]].

A SuperTrope to:
* BulletHell, characterized by very large numbers of slow-moving enemy projectiles, or fast moving on the hardest parts.
* CuteEmUp, cute and silly graphics and sound, although the action and difficulty are no less intense.

A SisterTrope to RailShooter.

Not to be confused with the movie ''Film/ShootEmUp''.

----
!!The Shoot 'em Up genre generally provides examples of the following:
* BulletHell: A subgenre. Please note that [[SquarePegRoundTrope "Bullet Hell" is not a catch-all term for the Shoot 'em Up genre]].
* CasualGame: Most games in the genre, especially older ones, can be summed up as "move stick/D-pad to move, press this button to shoot, press this button for SmartBomb, now go kill enemies trying to shoot you." However, some shmups, particularly more modern ones, avert this and go for more complicated gameplay; some examples include ''VideoGame/{{Stellavanity}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Hellsinker}}'', and the console-exclusive arrange modes of various Creator/{{CAVE}} games.
* CognizantLimbs: In some shooters, bosses may have certain parts such as limbs or weapons that can be destroyed for extra points. Sometimes destroying certain parts can make boss battles easier while other times it results in the bosses [[TurnsRed upping the ante]]. Some games such as ''VideoGame/WarningForever'' center around this trope.
* CollisionDamage: Generally, touching another airborne enemy will hurt you. Ground enemies can be safely flown over (unless you yourself are also on the ground). Other games, such as ''[[VideoGame/ShikigamiNoShiro Castle of Shikigami]]'' and ''VideoGame/RadiantSilvergun'' have obstacle levels where you are surrounded by walls and colliding into one will hurt you.
* ContinuingIsPainful: Using a continue will usually reset your score. This is important, because otherwise a player who can't avoid taking damage will be able to obtain a high score with fairly trivial effort. It also encourages players to go for a no-continue clear (otherwise known as a one-credit clear, or 1CC); it's often argued that a game is only counted as completed if it is done with no continues. A player who "credit-feeds" the game and calls it completed may as well have used an infinite lives cheat.
* DeadlyWalls: In most games where there are walls, touching a wall will kill you; this is usually justified in that you're flying a ship of some sort and rubbing against solid objects does bad things to your hull. In some other games, such as ''VideoGame/SuperAleste'' touching walls is harmless unless you get squashed between two walls or against the edge of the screen. In rare cases, like ''VideoGame/{{Hellsinker}}'' or ''VideoGame/{{Deathsmiles}}'', getting squished doesn't even hurt you at all, and you'll simply "snap" to where there is open space.
* DropInDropOutMultiplayer: Often, shoot-em-ups will have support for two simultaneous players, with a second player allowed to join at any time. As a courtesy, it is recommended that you ''ask'' before joining in on someone's game.
* EndlessGame: Older games tend to go on forever (or until you hit the KillScreen, if one exists), either in the form of ever-toughening waves or looping stages that increase in difficulty with each new playthrough. A few newer games, such as ''VideoGame/{{Eschatos}}'' and ''Warning Forever'', do feature endless modes, however.
* EveryTenThousandPoints: The usual method of obtaining a OneUp. Some games will offer a 1-up every ''x'' points, so as long as you keep racking up points you'll gain more one-ups. Some others will only offer one or two extra lives, and some will only offer it as an item or not at all.
* ItsUpToYou: Often, the plot states that the player character is the only one capable of taking on the enemy fleet.
* LifeMeter / OneHitPointWonder + VideoGameLives: One or the other; if you have a lifebar, the game typically ends once you empty out. If you have only one hit point, you usually get multiple lives, although some games allow you to set the number of starting lives to one. A few titles, such as ''VideoGame/NineteenFortyTwo Joint Strike'' and ''VideoGame/{{Kamui}}'', offer both a lifebar and multiple lives.
* NecessaryDrawback / CompetitiveBalance: Games that have multiple player characters/ships[[note]]"character" will be used in sub-examples for simplicity's sake[[/note]] require this in order to prevent any one character from being a GameBreaker or a low-end TierInducedScrappy:
** Characters with {{Spread Shot}}s can easily hit the entire screen, but in exchange have a hard time with a lone and durable enemy, and will often [[MightyGlacier have the speed of a turtle]]. The damage concentration problem can sometimes be solved by moving up close to the target, but one greatly risks a shot to the hitbox by doing so.
** Characters with linear shots can easily destroy strong enemies without having to point-blank the target. They will also have fast speed, allowing them to zip around to destroy multiple enemies, pick up items, etc. However, hitting anything to the sides will require the player to move a lot, and the fast speed may make precision maneuvers difficult.
** Characters with homing shots can simply "fire and forget" whether the targets are spread out or in one spot on the screen. But homing-shot characters also tend to have poor damage output ''and'' slow speed, making them AwesomeButImpractical sometimes.
* NintendoHard: The genre is well known for its relentless challenge, especially since it has its roots in arcade games, where difficulty is necessary to allow players to eventually put in more coins or hand the machine over to the next player and their money, generating profit for the arcade. Modern BulletHell games, particularly their {{True Final Boss}}es, contribute to the genre's "oh my god this crap is bloody impossible" image.
* PowerUp: Often by destroying unique item enemies. Some other games use ExperiencePoints, and a few games, even modern ones, eschew powerups altogether.
* ScoringPoints: A staple of the genre. Older games typically just amount to "kill enemies and collect point items", but newer games generally have more complex scoring systems, sometimes requiring [[SomeDexterityRequired dexterity]] or [[GuideDangIt a guide to figure out]].
* SmartBomb: In older games, these are intended as offensive weapons; it wasn't until the mid-90's that developers started taking their use as emergency defense rather than firepower into account. Generally, the rule of thumb is to avoid using them unless you're in a tight situation, but some games, like those developed by Shinobu Yagawa (e.g. ''VideoGame/BattleGaregga'', ''VideoGame/{{Ibara}}'') encourage you to bomb all over the place for bonus points.
* SpreadShot: A common type of weapon. Generally great against large crowds of enemies but lousy for bosses and other situations demanding precision. Characters and ships that specialize in spread shots tend to move slower as well.
* TurnsRed: As you chip away at a boss' life bar, once it hits a certain threshold they will take on a new form with more difficult attacks patterns. Although this has been seen in some older shoot 'em ups, it has become a commonplace in modern shooters, especially with bullet hell ones.
----
!!Examples of this genre includes:
[[index]]
[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder: Spacewar! derivatives: ]]

* ''VideoGame/{{Asteroids}}'' and sequel ''Asteroids Deluxe''
* ''VideoGame/BeatHazard'' (a twin-stick shooter that raves out to your music)
* ''VideoGame/BubbleTanks''
* ''Computer Space''
* ''Gravitar''
* ''Omega Race''
* ''VideoGame/SolarJetman''
* ''VideoGame/SpaceDuel''
* ''VideoGame/{{Spacewar}}'' (the Ur Example of this genre)
* ''VideoGame/SpheresOfChaos''
* ''Star Castle''
* ''VideoGame/StarControl''
** '' Star Control II'' (aka ''The Ur-Quan Masters'')
** ''VideoGame/SpacePiratesAndZombies''
* ''World Destroyers''
* ''X Pilot''
* ''VideoGame/YarsRevenge''
* ''Zero Gunner 2''

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Defender derivatives: ]]

* ''Choplifter''
* ''Chopper Command''
* ''VideoGame/{{Defender}}'' and its sequel, ''Stargate'' (no, ''not'' the TV series)
* ''VideoGame/FantasyZone''
* ''Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back'' (Atari 2600)
* ''Uridium''

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Space Invaders derivatives: ]]

* ''A.E.''
* ''VideoGame/{{Centipede}}''
** ''VideoGame/{{Millipede}}''
* ''VideoGame/{{Galaga}}'' (the Trope Codifier)
* ''VideoGame/{{Galaxian}}''
* ''VideoGame/{{Gorf}}''
* ''VideoGame/{{Gyruss}}'' (also an "into-the-screen" shooter)
* ''Pinball/{{Hyperball}}'', a not-quite-a-{{Pinball}} attempt to replicate the genre.
* ''Juno First''
* ''King & Balloon''
* ''Megamania''
* ''{{VideoGame/Phoenix}}'' and sequel ''Pleiads''
* ''VideoGame/SpaceInvaders'' (the Trope Maker)
* ''VideoGame/SuperCrossfire''
* ''Titanion''
* ''Wave 15'' (aka ''Astro'')

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Overhead run-and-gun shooters: ]]

* ''VideoGame/AlienSyndrome''
* ''VideoGame/{{Catacomb}}''
* ''VideoGame/{{Commando}}'' and its sequel, ''Mercs''
* ''Front Line''
* ''VideoGame/GatlingGears''
* ''VideoGame/GuerrillaWar''
* ''VideoGame/HeavyBarrel''
* ''VideoGame/IkariWarriors''
* ''VideoGame/{{Jackal}}''
* ''VideoGame/KikiKaiKai''
* ''VideoGame/LastAlert''

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Other shooters with two degrees of freedom: ]]

* ''VideoGame/AirSeaBattle'' (one of the Atari 2600 launch games)
* ''VideoGame/AlienBreed''
* ''VideoGame/AlienShooter''
* ''VideoGame/AquaNavalWarfare''
* ''VideoGame/ASPAirStrikePatrol'' (also known as ''DesertFighter'')
* ''VideoGame/{{Berzerk}}'' and its sequel, ''Frenzy''
* ''VideoGame/BigBangMini''
* ''VideoGame/{{Bosconian}}''
* ''VideoGame/CleanAsia''
* ''VideoGame/{{Cobra}}''
* ''VideoGame/{{Cobra 2}}''
* ''VideoGame/{{Combat}}''
* ''VideoGame/CrystalQuest'' and its sequel, ''Crystal Crazy''
* ''VideoGame/DeadNation''
* ''VideoGame/DesertStrike''
* ''VideoGame/ErstKerf'' (an over-head doujin shooter with RPG Elements)
* ''VideoGame/FireFight''
* ''VideoGame/FranticFrigates''
* ''Final Apocalypse'' (by the creators of ''The Tale of ALLTYNEX'' series)
* ''VideoGame/{{Fraxy}} (notable for its editor)''
* ''VideoGame/GeometryWars''
* ''Granada''
* ''[[VideoGame/{{Xevious}} Grobda]]''
* ''VideoGame/GunBros''
* ''Gunroar''
* ''IMadeAGameWithZombiesInIt'' (by the creators that later brought us ''The Dishwasher'' series of beat 'em ups)
* ''VideoGame/{{Luftrausers}}''
* ''VideoGame/NanoAssault''
* ''NationRed''
* ''Project Starfighter''
* ''Raid on Bungeling Bay''
* ''RealSpace''
* ''VideoGame/RenegadeOps''
* ''VideoGame/{{Robotron 2084}}''
** ''Llamatron: 2112''
* ''VideoGame/{{Scoregasm}}''
* ''SeekAndDestroy''
* ''VideoGame/{{Shadowgrounds}}''
* ''VideoGame/{{Sinistar}}''
* ''VideoGame/SmashTV''
* ''Franchise/StarTrek'' (the arcade game, not the computer strategy game)
* ''VideoGame/SuperStardustHD''
* ''Tank''
* ''VideoGame/{{Teleglitch}}''
* ''VideoGame/TimePilot'' and its sequel ''Time Pilot '84''
* ''Total Carnage'' (it uses auto-scrolling)
* ''VectorVendetta''
* ''Waves''
* ''VideoGame/{{Zone 66}}''

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Horizontal Scrolling Shooters: ]]

* ''VideoGame/AegisWing''
* ''VideoGame/AkaiKatana''
* ''VideoGame/AirZonk'' and it's sequel
* ''VideoGame/{{Apidya}}''
* ''VideoGame/AirFortress'' (half of it)
* ''{{Area 88}}'' (based on an anime/manga series; the game was renamed U.N. Squadron in the US.)
* ''VideoGame/BioHazardBattle''
* ''VideoGame/{{BIOMETAL}}'' (notable for its US version's soundtrack being 2 Unlimited techno music)
* ''VideoGame/BioShipPaladin''
* ''Blast Works'' [=/=] ''TUMIKI Fighters''
* ''VideoGame/BlazingStar''
* ''BorderDown''
* ''[[VideoGame/ThreeWonders Chariot: Adventures Through the Sky]]''
* ''VideoGame/ChimeraBeast (unreleased)''
* ''VideoGame/ChoAniki''
* ''[[VideoGame/FantasticNightDreamsCotton Cotton]]'' and its sequels
* ''VideoGame/{{Darius}}''
* ''VideoGame/DeathSmiles'' and its sequel
* ''VideoGame/DynamiteHeaddy'' (platformer with shooter levels)
* ''VideoGame/{{Einhander}}'' (an unexpected example from Square-Enix, formally Square-soft before the merger)
* ''VideoGame/EliminateDown''
* ''VideoGame/ForgottenWorlds''
* ''VideoGame/{{Gaiares}}''
* ''VideoGame/GunstarHeroes'' (run-n-gun with shooter levels)
* ''Gate of Thunder''
* ''VideoGame/{{Gradius}}''
** VideoGame/{{Parodius}} (simply put: Parody-Gradius)
*** VideoGame/{{Otomedius}} (a fanservice-laden combination of ''Gradius'' and ''Parodius'')
* ''Gundemonium'', it's modernized remake ''Gundemonium Recollection'', and sequel ''Gundeadligne'' from the ''VideoGame/GundemoniumSeries''
* ''VideoGame/HeavyWeapon''
* ''Hellfire''
* ''VideoGame/{{Hydorah}}''
* ''VideoGame/InTheHunt''
* ''{{Iwanaga}}''
* ''VideoGame/JetsNGuns''
* ''VideoGame/KeioFlyingSquadron'' (the first game; its sequel is mainly a platformer with a few shoot 'em up segments)
* ''Lords of Thunder''
* ''VideoGame/MagicalChase''
* ''VideoGame/MetalBlack''
* ''VideoGame/MidnightResistance''
* ''VideoGame/ParasiteStrike''
* ''Parsec''
* ''VideoGame/{{Phalanx}}''
* ''VideoGame/PrehistoricIsle''
* ''VideoGame/{{Progear}}''
* ''VideoGame/{{Pulstar}}''
* ''Revenge Of The Mutant Camels''
* ''Revolver360'' and its sequel ''Revolver360 RE:ACTOR''
* ''VideoGame/RobotDinosaursThatShootBeamsWhenTheyRoar''
* ''RPGShooterStarwish''
* ''VideoGame/{{R-Type}}''
* ''VideoGame/SamuraiZombieNation''
* ''VideoGame/{{SATAZIUS}}''
* ''VideoGame/{{Scramble}}'' and ''Super Cobra''
* ''Silkworm''
* ''VideoGame/SineMora''
* ''VideoGame/SkyGunner''
* ''Sol-Feace''
* ''SoldnerX''
* ''Space Manbow''
* ''VideoGame/{{Stargunner}}''
* ''VideoGame/SteelEmpire''
* ''SteelSaviour''
* ''SubmarineAttack''
* ''VideoGame/{{SUGURI}}''
** ''VideoGame/{{sora}}''
* ''VideoGame/SuperAmazingWagonAdventure'' (a parody of ''The Organ Trail'')
* ''VideoGame/ThunderCross'' and ''Thunder Cross II''
* ''VideoGame/ThunderForce'' (''I'' and ''II'' include top down multi-direction levels)
* ''VideoGame/TroubleWitches'' (more-or-less, the doujin successor of ''Magical Chase'')
* ''VideoGame/VacantArk''
* ''VideoGame/{{Vanguard}}'' (which also had some vertical and diagonal scrolling)
* ''VideoGame/{{Walker}}''
* ''VideoGame/WastelandAngel''
* ''VideoGame/ZeroWing''

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Vertical Scrolling Shooters: ]]

* ''VideoGame/NineteenFortyTwo'' series
* ''AeroFighters'' / ''SonicWings'' series
* ''Air Duel''
** ''[[VideoGame/FireBarrel Air Assault]]'' (a.k.a. ''Fire Barrel'')
* ''VideoGame/{{Aleste}}'' / ''Power Strike'' series
** [[VideoGame/{{MUSHA}} M.U.S.H.A.]]
** ''VideoGame/SuperAleste'' (a.k.a. ''Space Megaforce'')
* ''VideoGame/AngryLaserSpace''
* ''VideoGame/AreaFlat'' series
* ''ArmedPoliceBatrider''
* ''Astro Assembler''
* ''Astro Blaster''
* ''VideoGame/BattleGaregga'' and its sequel ''Battle Bakraid''
* ''VideoGame/BattleSquadron''
* ''VideoGame/BlazingLazers''
* ''Blue Wish'' and [[BlueWishResurrection its remake]]
* ''VideoGame/BurnTheTrash''
* ''VideoGame/TheChasteFullmetalMaidenLeiria'' and its remake (both of which are freeware)
* ''VideoGame/ChickenInvaders''
* ''VideoGame/ChoRenSha68K''
* ''VideoGame/CrimzonClover''
* ''VideoGame/DangunFeveron''
* ''Demon Star''
* ''VideoGame/{{Dogyuun}}''
* ''VideoGame/DonPachi'' and ''[=DoDonPachi=]'' series
* ''Dragon Spirit''
* ''{{Enigmata}}'' and its sequel
* ''[[VideoGame/EspRaDe ESP Ra.De.]]''
** ''VideoGame/{{Espgaluda}}'' and its sequel
* ''[[VideoGame/{{EXceed}} eXceed]]'' series:
** ''[=eXceed=]-Gun Bullet Children-'' (a straight-forward shooter)
** ''[=eXceed2nd=]-VAMPIRE-'' and its remake by Tennan-Sozai (an ''Ikaruga''-styled shooter)
** ''[=eXceed3rd=]-JADE PENETRATE-'' and its remake by Tennan-Sozai
* ''Fighter & Attacker'' (''F/A'' in Japan; generic 1992 Namco shooter better known for its God Tier soundtrack)
* ''Flying Shark'' and its sequel ''VideoGame/FireShark''
* ''VideoGame/GigaWing''
* ''VideoGame/TheGuardianLegend''
* ''Hitogata Happa'' from the ''VideoGame/GundemoniumSeries''
* ''VideoGame/GunNac''
* ''Gun.Smoke''
* ''VideoGame/{{Guwange}}''
* ''Guxt''
* ''VideoGame/{{Hellsinker}}''
* ''VideoGame/HighwayHunter''
* ''HiNoTori'' (the MSX game)
* ''VideoGame/{{Ibara}}''
* ''VideoGame/{{Ikaruga}}'' (''Radiant Silvergun''[='=]s spiritual successor)
* ''Image Fight''
* ''VideoGame/JamestownLegendOfTheLostColony''
* ''VideoGame/JudgementSilversword''
** ''VideoGame/{{Eschatos}}'', the sequel to JSS
* ''VideoGame/{{Ketsui}}''
* ''VideoGame/KingsKnight''
* ''Kiloblaster''
* ''Knightmare''
* ''VideoGame/LegendaryWings''
* ''VideoGame/LenEn''
* ''VideoGame/LethalThunder'' (also known as ''Thunder Blaster'')
* ''VideoGame/MahouDaisakusen'' series (''Sorcer Striker'', ''Kingdom Grandprix'', ''Dimahoo'')
* ''VideoGame/MarsMatrix''
* ''VideoGame/{{Minubeat}}''
* ''[[VideoGame/MuchiMuchiPork Muchi-Muchi Pork]]''
* ''VideoGame/MushihimeSama'' and its sequel
* ''Night Raid''
* ''Noiz2sa''
* ''Parsec47''
* ''Psyvariar''
* ''VideoGame/PrismaticSolid''
* ''VideoGame/RadiantSilvergun''
* ''VideoGame/{{Raiden}}''
** ''VideoGame/RaidenFighters''
* ''[[VideoGame/RaptorCallOfTheShadows Raptor: Call of the Shadows]]''
* VideoGame/RaySeries
** ''[=RayForce=]''
*** ''R-GEAR'' (an unreleased sequel to ''[=RayForce=]'')
** ''[=RayStorm=]''
** ''[=RayCrisis=]''
* ''VideoGame/{{Recca}}'' (Summer Carnival '92)
* ''VideoGame/RiverRaid''
* ''rRootage''
* ''VideoGame/{{Seihou}}''
* ''VideoGame/ShikigamiNoShiro'' (a.k.a. ''Castle of Shikigami'')
* ''Silpheed series''
* ''VideoGame/{{Soukyugurentai}}'' (a.k.a. ''Terradiver'')
* ''Spy Hunter''
* ''Star Force''
* ''VideoGame/StarSoldier series''
* ''VideoGame/StraniaTheStellaMachina''
* ''VideoGame/{{Strikers 1945}}''
* ''SWIV''
** ''Mega SWIV'' (a.k.a ''Firepower 2000'')
* ''VideoGame/TheTaleOfAlltynex'' series:
** ''VideoGame/{{Kamui}}'' (1999)
** ''VideoGame/RefleX'' (2008)
** ''VideoGame/AlltynexSecond'' (2010)
* ''VideoGame/TigerHeli''
* ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' series
* ''VideoGame/TriggerheartExelica''
* ''TWAIN'' series
** ''[[TwilightInsanity TWilight INSanity]]''
** ''[[TwilightRefrain TWilight refrAIN]]''
** ''AlternateSphere''
* ''VideoGame/{{Twinbee}}'' series (''Moero!! Twinbee'' / ''Stinger'' has horizontal scrolling in alternate stages)
* ''VideoGame/TwinCobra'' and its sequel
* ''VideoGame/TwinkleStarSprites''
* ''VideoGame/{{Tyrian}}''
* ''Under Defeat''
* ''VideoGame/UpgradeComplete''
* ''VisualNovel/{{Valhellio}}'' (also a visual novel)
* ''VideoGame/XenoFighters''
* ''VideoGame/{{Xevious}}''
* ''{{XOP}}'' and ''XOP Black''
* ''{{Zanac}}''

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Other scrolling shooters: ]]

* ''VideoGame/{{Abadox}}'' (scrolled horizontally and vertically on alternate stages)
* ''A-Jax'' (alternates vertical scrolling and 3d scrolling stages)
* ''VideoGame/{{Axelay}}'' (scrolled horizontally and vertically on alternate stages)
* ''Burai Fighter'' (scrolled both horizontally and vertically, with no fixed orientation)
* ''VideoGame/EtherVapor'' (scrolled horizontally and vertically on alternate stages)
** ''VideoGame/{{Astebreed}}'' (SpritualSuccessor, scrolling in many different directions and swithces often)
* ''Salamander'' / ''Life Force'' (spinoff of the ''Gradius'' series; scrolled horizontally and vertically on alternate stages)
* ''VideoGame/SilverSurfer'' (scrolled horizontally and vertically on alternate stages)
* ''VideoGame/StarshipHector'' (spinoff of the VideoGame/StarSoldier series; scrolled horizontally and vertically on alternate stages)
* ''VideoGame/TheReap'' (3D-looking game that scrolls diagonally in isometric projection)
* ''Thunder Blade'' (scrolled vertically and into-the-screen on alternate stages)
* ''Viewpoint'' (scrolled diagonally and had isometric graphics)
* ''VideoGame/WarningForever'' (vertical boss-rush variant with ever evolving boss encounters)
* ''VideoGame/{{Zaxxon}}'' (scrolled diagonally in isometric projection)

[[/folder]]

[[folder: "Into-the-Screen" Shooters: ]]

* ''VideoGame/The3DBattlesOfWorldRunner''
* ''VideoGame/AfterBurner''
* ''VideoGame/BuckRogersPlanetOfZoom''
* ''Feedback''
* ''[[VideoGame/GIJoe G.I.Joe]]''
* ''VideoGame/{{Gyruss}}'' (also a Space Invaders derivative)
* ''Mission Starlight''
* ''VideoGame/NightStriker''
* ''Iridion/Nanostray series''
* ''VideoGame/LiberationMaiden''
* ''[[VideoGame/FantasticNightDreamsCotton Panorama Cotton]]''
* ''VideoGame/PanzerDragoon''
** ''VideoGame/CrimsonDragon''
* ''{{Polybius}}''
* ''VideoGame/{{Rez}}''
** ''VideoGame/ChildOfEden''
* ''VideoGame/SpaceHarrier'' and its sequels
* ''VideoGame/StarFox'' ([[GenreShift with the exception of]] ''VideoGame/StarFoxAdventures'' and ''VideoGame/StarFox2''[[note]]the first being a DolledUpInstallment and the latter instead relying on {{Old School Dogfight}}ing[[/note]])
** ''[[VideoGame/StarFox1 Star Fox]]''
** ''VideoGame/StarFox64''
** ''VideoGame/StarFoxAssault''
** ''VideoGame/StarFoxCommand''
* ''Franchise/StarWars''
* ''Tailgunner''
* ''VideoGame/{{Tempest}}'' (stylized craft at the top of a well)
** ''Tempest 2000''
* ''Torus Trooper''

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Miscellaneous shooters: ]]

* ''VideoGame/AquaRhapsody''
* ''VideoGame/ArcAngle'' (Not exactly a "shooter"- your character does not fire at all)
* ''VideoGame/BloonsSuperMonkey''
* ''Change Air Blade'' (cross between a fighting game and a shmup, but both players are on one screen)
* ''VideoGame/ChangelingBulletHell''
* ''VideoGame/EscapeVelocity'' series (wide-open sandbox RPG with ''Asteroids''-like combat)
** ''VideoGame/{{Colosseum}}''
** ''VideoGame/{{Polycon}}''
** ''VideoGame/StarfleetAdventures''
** ''VideoGame/{{Naev}}'', a SpiritualSuccessor.
* ''VideoGame/ForbiddenForest''
* ''{{VideoGame/Gauntlet}}'' (a mix of shooter and adventure game)
* ''Liberator'' (''VideoGame/MissileCommand'' in reverse)
* ''VideoGame/MissileCommand'' (defending immobile targets with your immobile yourself)
* ''Red Baron'' (early attempt at 3D fighter combat)
* ''The Red Star'' (mix of shooter and beat 'em up)
* ''Philosoma'', an obscure [=PlayStation=] shooting game known for its shift in perspectives (top-down, side-scrolling, into-the-screen, ''bottom-up'', and diagonal).
* ''VideoGame/SASZombieAssault''
* ''VideoGame/SenkoNoRonde'' (a mix of bullet hell shoot 'em up and a ''Virtual-ON''-esque fighting game)
* ''SpaceZap'' (defending a fixed fortification)
* ''VideoGame/SigmaStarSaga'' (an RPG with the battle system being Shoot 'Em Up segments.)
* ''VideoGame/SinAndPunishment'' (ground-based rail shooter with some platforming elements)
** ''VideoGame/SinAndPunishmentStarSuccessor'' (removed the platforming elements and added flight, making it even more shmup-like)
* ''VideoGame/StarRaiders'' (early mix of shoot 'em up and a real-time strategy)
* ''VideoGame/{{Thexder}}'' and ''Fire Hawk: Thexder the Second Contact'' (cross between shooting and exploring)
* ''{{VideoGame/TRON}}'' (four separate minigames, three of which involved shooting)
* ''Valkyrie Sky'' (an MMO shooter)
* ''{{VideoGame/Venture}}'' (maze shooter with an adventure game theme)
* ''VideoGame/WizardOfWor'' (a maze shooter)
[[/index]]
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