A SuperHero has to face their entire RoguesGallery one by one in rapid succession, leaving no time to rest. Race to stop this villain from blowing up the bridge, then dash to the other side of town to free the mayor from another villain...and the villains are almost always fought in order by the SortingAlgorithmOfEvil -- weakest first, strongest last. In the climax, the hero has to face the toughest villain, who is quite refreshed, while the hero is exhausted.

While it makes sense in theory, the scheme raises the question of why the villains [[MookChivalry don't just attack all at once]]. The most common reason is that they didn't plan it -- the BigBad has manipulated them into doing it. That way, the hero and villains can weaken each other for the BigBad to step in and win (LetsYouAndHimFight). Either that, or [[ContrivedCoincidence they all coincidentally caused incidents for the hero to stop one after another]], but [[RuleOfDrama since when do such things happen without being orchestrated by someone?]]

Heroes with especially awesome [[RoguesGallery Rogues Galleries]] will run into this more often; Batman does it all the time. Made possible by VillainDecay -- the guy who almost killed you last time is taken out with a flick of your wrist while you move on to the next one.

Incidentally, the "Gauntlet" that appears in the name of this trope doesn't refer to an armored glove, or even to the notion of "throwing down the gauntlet." It comes independently from the archaic word ''gantelope'', meaning a double-file of men facing each other and armed with clubs (or other weapons) with which to strike at an individual who is made to run between them. (It was commonly practiced in the British Army; you can see how speakers with different accents would get those two words confused.) So, yes, it should be spelled "run the ''gantlet''", but [[IncrediblyLamePun the pun's]] [[{{VideoGame/Gauntlet}} too obvious]].

Compare BossRush for when videogames have you face previously defeated bosses in rapid succession.

Compare RoguesGalleryShowcase. [[IThoughtItMeant For when a character runs a physical gauntlet]], see DeathCourse.


[[folder: Anime And Manga ]]

* A heroic version occurs in the ''{{Anime/Pokemon}}'' animé when Ash is facing Drake, the Orange Islands champion. Through most of their match, Ash has knocked out five of Drake's Pokémon, while Drake has taken out only two of his. Drake sends out his trump card, a very powerful Dragonite, but Ash eventually manages to beat it by rotating his remaining Pokémon and forcing Dragonite to take them down one by one. Dragonite defeats Charizard, Squirtle, and Tauros one after another, but they all do enough damage that the Dragonite is exhausted by the time Pikachu is sent out. The Frontier Brains is another non-villainous version of this. While League tournaments involve hundreds of trainers, a participant in either of these special "leagues" only ever battles each of the Frontier Brains one at a time.
* In an anime where [[MagicMusic singing]] is the (pretty much) only method of battle, MermaidMelodyPichiPichiPitch had a [[RunTheGauntlet gauntlet run]]. And it was PlayedForLaughs. Why? In the first level of the tower the bad guys made as part of some ridiculous plan or other, the first 'boss', [[{{Kawaiiko}} Alala]], was merely bypassed and ignored. In the second level was [[DragonLady Lanhua]], who was BowledOver by a bowling ball (don't ask how it go there, they don't know either). The third was [[VillainousCrossdresser Lady Bat]], who was 'repelled' when his [[ViewerGenderConfusion (yes, his)]] breath [[ItMakesSenseInContext reeked of curry]]. The fourth level had [[MonsterOfTheWeek the 'planner' Napoleon]], who let them by after the heroines threatened them with a beating (he was rather short). It was at the fifth and final level where the singing ensued. But not before a [[CrowningMomentOfFunny Crowning Music of Funny]] [[ItMakesSenseInContext from the hostage the heroines were trying to rescue]].
* In ''Manga/{{Bleach}}'', after Ichigo defeats Grimmjow, he is immediately pitted against Nnoitra Jilga, who was a full rank above Grimmjow. This trope gets inverted on Nnoitra when [[spoiler: Nel is revealed to be the former third Espada]], who then proceeds to mercilessly beat the crap out of Nnoitra. However, [[spoiler: Nel's]] release deactivates at the worst possible time. After Nnoitra's KickTheDog moment, he sends his Fraccion Tesla to finish off Ichigo, but [[spoiler: Kenpachi]] appears to not only defeat Tesla, but almost immediately goes to fight Nnoitra.
* This has happened to Manga/{{Ranma|OneHalf}}. It [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters took a while]].
* When the Seven Devils kidnap Meat (More specifically, they ''break him into pieces and keep each part''), they force ''Manga/{{Kinnikuman}}'' to fight each of them one at a time. After defeating Stecase King and Black Hole, Kin has become too injured to fight and the other Justice Choujin have to step in and take out a few Devil Choujin on their own. However, only Terryman and Brocken Jr (With aid from Mongolman) prevail, leaving Atlantis to Kin, Springman to Mongolman, and finally Buffaloman to Kin. Something similar happens when the Devil Knights steal the Gold Mask and force Kin to fight them for it.


[[folder: Comic Books ]]

* ''ComicBook/SpiderMan''
** Spider-Man's first fight with the Sinister Six. This has been [[{{Handwave}} explained]] as being so each villain would have a chance to get the "honor" of killing Spidey himself. Spidey has since called this a "bone-headed method of teaming up" and in all subsequent fights, the Six attack en masse.
** Gently parodied in Spider-Girl's fight with the Savage Six -- the entire issue was one big homage to the entire first Sinister Six issue, the leader of the Savage Six employed the same method of attack, and his brother, also a super-villain, called him an idiot. The final fight (between the exhausted hero and fresh villain) is thoroughly subverted when Spider-Girl calls in a few favors, and the last villain is confronted by just about every hero in the ''ComicBook/MarvelComics2'' 'verse. He wisely surrenders at that point.
** Norman Osborn once claimed that only a gauntlet would work against Spider-Man since the webhead is "good with groups," using the opponents' powers against them and cause infighting.
** After a period where the classic villains were put aside to focus on new faces, there was an arc ''titled'' "The Gauntlet," where the Kravenoff family set up Spidey's classic RoguesGallery to fight him one after another and wear him down. The cover for the first collected volume encapsulates the trope almost perfectly - Spider-Man lies battered atop his fallen enemies.
* The Comicbook/{{X-Men}} frequently faced this, with a PlotTailoredToTheParty to go with it.
* Every arc Franchise/{{Batman}} has been in lately, from ''ComicBook/{{Knightfall}}'' to ''Hush'' -- and also every non-canon miniseries he's ''ever'' been in, from ''Child of Dreams'' to ''ComicBook/TheLongHalloween'' to ''ComicBook/DarkVictory.'' ''Child of Dreams'' is an interesting case - none of the villains he faces are the real deal. They're crazies who ''think'' they're his iconic arch enemies.
** ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'',''WesternAnimation/TheBatman'', and ''WesternAnimation/BewareTheBatman'' had The Bat fight all of his villains one after the other. Deadly threats from previous episodes were reduced to petty {{Mook}}s, {{Elite Mook}}s at best.
*** In fact, the last level of the video game (which was based on the animated series) is a boss rush, called 'The Gauntlet'.
** Justified in Grant Morrison's ''Comicbook/ArkhamAsylumASeriousHouseOnSeriousEarth''. Batman faces all of his opponents in the eponymous Asylum, as part of a twisted game of hide and seek. They don't all just fall on him at once because they've spread out to look for him. Many of the confrontations are also purely psychological. Of course, then there's the wheelchair-bound Doctor Destiny- Him, Batman just kicks down the stairs.
* Creator/AlanMoore's {{Superman}} story, "ComicBook/WhateverHappenedToTheManOfTomorrow}}?" is one part parody, one part {{Deconstruction}}, and one part LampshadeHanging.
* It's subverted in ''TheFlash'' because the Rogues are rarely known to pull a caper alone. They firmly believe in strength in numbers.
** Of course, in the case of TheFlash, most of his enemies are either underpowered or ridiculously unsuited for facing a guy who can move and react at near light speed. Even all together it's no surprise they get their asses kicked every time.
*** Actually they are very well suited to fighting a Speedster, they just don't want to kill him. When there's someone coming at you at near the speed of light or even the speed of sound the best tactic is to slow him down enough to get away or land a hit that will knock him out.
** In fact, the first time this plot was used back in TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks, it was in a story called "The Gauntlet of Super-Villans;" after that, the Rogues began appearing in team-ups at least as often as they did solo to the point that such team-ups became unremarkable in the series.
* Freedom Force has you fight your entire Rogues Gallery before taking on Time Master.
* Typhoid Mary recruits a number of Comicbook/{{Daredevil}}'s enemies to put the horn-headed hero through this trope. It's also a variant in that the villains ''win'', beating Daredevil to within an inch of his life and leaving him for dead.
** The Typhoid version is specifically a [[DeconstructedTrope deconstruction]] of the Sinister Six plot from Spider-Man, complete with epic full-page splash panels as each villain turns up, to show what would most like happen if the hero really did have to fight so many villains in a row and they weren't handed the IdiotBall. As each villain appears and takes their shot, Daredevil's injuries and fatigue pile up until the final few confrontations have him as a bloody, concussed, hallucinating wreck basically being kicked while he's down.
** Even earlier, Daredevil contended with a small squadron of his 1960s villains in the Emissaries of Evil, which started out as this trope before turning into a more standard LegionOfDoom scenario where they all regrouped after losing to him one-on-one and attacked him together to equally poor results.
* A variant on this happened in the conclusion to Bendis' ''Comicbook/NewAvengers'', where Comicbook/DoctorStrange had to fight the assembled Avengers and New Avengers one-on-one, without hurting them, because a spirit-form enemy who wanted him dead was body-surfing from one to another.


[[folder: [[Fanfic Tropes Fanfic ]]
* In WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents fanfic [[http://www.fanfiction.net/s/2973937/1/Discovery Discovery]], Timmy Turner RunTheGauntlet of all his magical enemies and his ImaginaryFriend.
* Issue #50 of ''[[FanFic/UltimateSleepwalker Ultimate Sleepwalker: The New Dreams]]'' forces Sleepwalker to take on all six of the Nasty Boys by himself. A few issues later, he goes through this trope ''again'' when [[spoiler:the Green Goblin puts a $1 million prize on his head.]] He's forced to fight several villains trying to claim the prize one after another, and they each do a number on him. By the time he fights the last villain, Sleepwalker is so exhausted that [[spoiler:he would have been killed without the help of a HeroicBystander]].
* Happens twice in ''FanFic/MyLittleMagesTheNightmaresReturn'':
** First, the girls have to fight each member of the QuirkyMinibossSquad (or a trap laid by them, in Iron Will's case) while making their way to the castle in the Everfree.
** The second time (which also incorporates a non-lethal DwindlingParty scenario), has them running into each villain again while fighting their way through the castle itself, with the girls peeling off one by one to deal with them and catching back up later.
* Happens in Chapter 60 of ''Fanfic/ChildOfTheStorm'' with the forces of HYDRA gunning for [[spoiler: Bobby Drake]] and having to go through [[spoiler: [[PlotRelevantAgeUp Harry and his aged up friends]]]] to get him. Justified because their first attack is geared for a quick snatch and they quickly find themselves monstrously outgunned. After that, Lucius responds by chucking the kitchen sink at them (n the form of [[spoiler: a proto Destroyer]] and [[spoiler: an army of [[HumanoidAbomination Slendermen]]]] because [[spoiler: Bobby is a young Omega Class mutant and with Xavier out of commission and Magneto distracted, this is possibly their only chance to 'recruit' him]] and because he recognises Harry's singular talent for being a SpannerInTheWorks, having been on the receiving end of it before, and is intent on making sure that it doesn't happen again. And unlike most examples, but for an appropriately timed BigDamnHeroes and [[spoiler: a HeelFaceTurn by the Winter Soldier]], it would would have worked.


[[folder: Professional Wrestling ]]

* Among the many types of {{gimmick matches}} devised in pro wrestling, there is the running variation of the "Gauntlet" match, where one wrestler has to fight three or more opponents one after another, without a break. The match can end with when the runner is defeated or if the match maker is being particularly nasty, when every wrestler has wrestled, regardless of how many times the runner is defeated. As you can tell, running is usually a form of punishment, though it will make the runner look good if he succeeds, such as when Wrestling/ChrisBenoit took on and defeated on his fellow Radicalz (Wrestling/DeanMalenko, Wrestling/PerrySaturn, and Wrestling/EddieGuerrero). "Normal" gauntlets are not examples of this trope though, being a series of matches that continued until there is one winner and are not centered around a single wrestler.
* Johnny Doyle's Wrestling/{{N|ationalWrestlingAlliance}}WA Los Angeles introduced the "Beat the Champ" Television Title in 1950s, where the current "champion" was given the challenge of beating randomly selected "challengers" for five weeks in the row. If he failed, he had to pay the former "champion" 100 USD. The belt was revived by NWA Hollywood in 1960s, Wrestling/SmokeyMountainWrestling in the 1990s and NWA Wildside in the 2000s.
* In a variation, Wrestling/TheBigShow (in early 2013) challenged all comers and several members of the locker room decided to come out like this. After a few matches, Wrestling/TheMiz stood up from the announcer table where he was filling in and decided to take the challenge, whereupon Show decided enough was enough and went backstage to rest.
* In June 2015, following the ''Smash Kicks ALS'' event, Wrestling/ChrisHero decided to raise more money for the cause by willingly running the gauntlet thirty minutes to every five hundred dollars. He raised 3440, resulting in him wrestling for three hours and thirty minutes straight and him winning twelve out of seventeen matches.


[[folder: Film ]]

* ''Film/GodzillaFinalWars'': Franchise/{{Godzilla}} gets to fight most of his known and lesser known opponents from the previous movies.


[[folder: Live Action TV ]]

* Series/PowerRangersLostGalaxy: the episode ''Hexuba's Graveyard'', a sorceress named Hexuba brings back several former monsters of the week to fight the rangers before fighting them herself. This example include the VillainDecay, in that a monster that the Rangers previously couldn't defeat without their group power-up, the Lights of Orion, is taken down by the Red Ranger alone. (To be honest, any time a monster appears for the second time in the franchise, it's rarely as powerful as it was the first time.)
** An earlier season featured Lord Zedd doing this with several monsters as well. It also provided a very rare case of a MonsterOfTheWeek [[TookALevelInBadass Taking A Level In Badass]], as Pumpkin Rapper put up a good fight against the Megazord by himself when the Rangers had previously destroyed him without even using one.


[[folder: Literature ]]

* The final book of the ''Spy High'' series, ''Agent Orange'', has this. The heroes fight through virtual recreations of every major villain (and some minor ones) from the previous 11 books in order to finally reach the [[BigBad Big Bad]]'s lair.


[[folder: Video Games ]]

* The entire ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamSeries'':
** ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamAsylum'': For the same reasons as ''A Serious House on Serious Earth.'' SelfDemonstrating/{{The Joker}} is either the leader of or leads Batman into confrontations with villains such as [[PsychoSupporter Harley Quinn]], [[MadDoctor Scarecrow]], [[GeniusBruiser Bane]], [[AxCrazy Victor Zsasz]] and [[ImAHumanitarian Killer Croc]].
** ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamCity'' averts the trope somewhat: the villains aren't a unified force, but Batman still eventually fights half his RoguesGallery in one night. The full list of everyone Batman takes down: [[BigBad Dr. Hugo Strange]], SelfDemonstrating/{{The Joker}}, Two-Face, Penguin, Riddler, Harley Quinn, [[spoiler:Ra's al-Ghul]], Mr. Freeze, [[spoiler:Clayface]], Mad Hatter, [[spoiler:Hush]], Deadshot, Victor Zsasz, Bane and Solomon Grundy.
** ''VideoGame/{{Batman Arkham Origins}}'' plays it straight: now it's a team of assassins (Deathstroke, Deadshot, Bane, Lady Shiva, Killer Croc, Firefly, Copperhead and the Electrocutioner) out for Batman's blood over the course of one night, under the banner of [[TortureTechnician Black Mask]]. [[spoiler:Or at least the Joker in disguise.]] And there are side-mission villains to fight too - Mad Hatter, [[spoiler:the ''actual'' Black Mask]], Anarky and Bird.
** ''VideoGame/{{Batman Arkham Knight}}'' has Scarecrow as the BigBad this time, uniting Gotham's major villains under one banner. His team consists of Two-Face, Penguin, Harley Quinn, Riddler, [[spoiler:Deathstroke]], Firefly, and finally his [[BigBadDuumvirate partner,]] the mysterious [[AntagonistTitle Arkham Knight]]. Most of the villains follow the trope by committing a big crime each to wear Batman down, while the Knight and Scarecrow work on their EvilPlan. Other villains like Hush, [[spoiler:Man-Bat]], [[spoiler:Deacon Blackfire]] and [[spoiler:Professor Pyg]] are out doing their own thing, and to cap it all off [[spoiler:Joker's [[TheCorruption infected blood]] manifests as the mad clown [[GrandTheftMe trying to take Batman's body for himself.]]]]


[[folder: Webcomics ]]

* In ''Webcomic/TowerOfGod'' Phantaminum single handedly enters the palace of Zahard and defeats all who stand in his way (comprised of the strongest rankers in the tower) who then makes his way towards Zahard.


[[folder: Web Original ]]

* BigBad Baron Samedi once manipulated the other super-criminals in New Orleans to do this to Battlecat in the ''Roleplay/GlobalGuardiansPBEMUniverse''.


[[folder: Western Animation ]]

* Inverted in ''TransformersCybertron,'' when Starscream decides he's getting the Omega Lock, ''dammit,'' and fights his way through ''eleven Autobots in a row'', successfully distracts Optimus Prime, and gets away with the Lock, free and clear.
* One episode of ''[[WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague Justice League Unlimited]]'' centers around four of the Flash's rogues taking turns trying to kill him as Central City prepares to dedicate a museum to him. Eventually, however, Captain Cold decides that taking turns is dumb and says that they should all attack him at the museum's opening. The others (except for [[FriendlyEnemy the Trickster]]) agree.
* ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'' did this for an entire arc in the fifth and final season, culminating in an ultimate battle royale with every single hero facing off against every single villain ever to appear over the course of the series (yet surprisingly successfully).
** Then they follow it up with every single hero fighting [[HarmlessVillain Dr. Light]], which is the inverse of this trope. We don't learn the actual result, but we can safely assume [[SarcasmMode Dr. Light won]].