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[[quoteright:345:[[Film/SilentHill http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/real-women-dont-wear-dresses_silent-hill_5621.PNG]]]]
[[caption-width-right:345: Guess which of these women is the tough, competent one.]]
--> "''And over time [the writers] realized that you don't have to put a sword in a woman's hand to make her seem tough.''"
-->-- '''Creator/LivTyler''', on the developement of her character Arwen from ''Film/TheLordOfTheRings.''

A woman is shown as weak, incompetent, and ineffectual unless she dresses and behaves in a masculine manner, or is otherwise applauded for being "not like other girls." A variation is a TomboyAndGirlyGirl scenario, where the tomboy is presented as superior.

We're just recording the trope, here. It happens. Between a woman in trousers and one in a dress, the odds are the trouser lady is going to be the ActionGirl of the pair and the one in the dress is going to be a DamselInDistress. [[PlayingWith/RealWomenDontWearDresses Variations exist, of course,]] especially in works after the third-wave "Girl Power" feminism. Many of the straight examples are from [[FairForItsDay older works]], when having proactive female characters ''at all'' was fairly edgy.

See also PinkMeansFeminine and the various tropes on AcceptableFeminineGoalsAndTraits.

Contrast GirlyBruiser, LadyOfWar, SilkHidingSteel, and KickingAssInAllHerFinery, where it's the feminine lady in the dress who you should watch out for. Also, compare VasquezAlwaysDies, where trouser-wearing and competence aren't enough to keep a woman alive, and RealMenWearPink.

'''Note:''' This is not an audience reaction trope. The trope is reserved for cases where a character is derided by another character in-universe for having traditionally feminine traits, or where the work itself ''clearly'' portrays femininity as a sign of weakness or inferiority.

----
!!Examples:

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:Anime and Manga]]
* In ''Anime/SailorMoon'', the infamous StayInTheKitchen remarks by Jadeite in the first season, where he takes [[TheWorfEffect Tuxedo Kamen out of the fight]] and then mocks the girls. Moon, Mercury and Mars responded with a KirkSummation and an awesome [[CarFu Three Plane Fu]].
-->'''Jadeite''': Can’t you do anything without the help of a man? Women are such foolish creatures in the end! Bwahahahahaha!
-->'''Mars''': Hah! Only old men think that they’re better than women in these days!
-->'''Mercury''': That’s right! Scorning women is positively feudalistic!
-->'''Moon''': Down with sexual discrimination!
-->'''The three''': We must fight against Jadeite, that arrogant man!
** Script/ShadowjackWatchesSailorMoon [[http://forum.rpg.net/showpost.php?p=10888427&postcount=369 further speculates]] on how this show is an aversion of this trope.
---> What I find fascinating about the series is that it really is ''girl power'' in action. It does not take traditionally "masculine" action tropes and simply gender swap them, no, and it does not deny or condemn the attraction of the pretty princess fantasy. Instead, it takes all the "feminine" girly stuff like frilly princess dresses and pink unicorns and ''makes them into implements of power''. The hypothetical girl in the audience is being told that she can be ''as girly as she likes'' and ''still'' dream of growing up into power and responsibility. Feminine articles are not shackles or playthings to be eschewed, or tools good only for obtaining the approval of men -- they are treated as cool and desirable things, in and of themselves.
---> Boy craziness is even part of this, in the way they make the knightly romance fantasy an ''active one''. The girls wanna be swept off their feet by a handsome knight, and, damn it, they're gonna go out there and ''find'' that handsome knight and make sure he does it.
** Now has [[Dresses/SailorMoon it's own page]].
* ''Manga/SkipBeat'': Kanae aka Moko deliberately calls out Kyouko when they meet only because she perceives Kyouko as a "HouseWife"-type of woman who [[StayInTheKitchen shouldn't stay near show business]]. Even later in the manga, when both have a kind-of-friendship and Kyouko has shown [[PluckyGirl how scarily competent she can be when acting]], Kanae still feels uncomfortable with Kyouko due to her own perceived contradiction between being able to do any domestic chores and being a reputed actress and entertainer. There is a twist: [[spoiler: Kanae also acts as a housewife for her own very large family, as her parents are always traveling and her older brothers are no help, [[NotSoDifferent and seeing Kyoko reminded her of herself.]] Kanae's type of housewifing is more like an extreme sport and it's kind of easy to understand why she is so annoyed by it.]]
* In ''Anime/DemashitaPowerpuffGirlsZ'', Buttercup is shown to be reluctant to join [[TheTeam the group]] because it would require her to wear a skirt. Later she breaks her own code by wearing one in order to get the attention of a boy she has a crush on, but realizes that she prefers her boyfriend to like her as she is and not for what she pretends to be. Despite the fact that she isn't complaining about the skirt anymore, [[BerserkButton don't mention it]] to her; just don't.
* In ''Manga/{{Freezing}}'', it's interesting to try to apply this trope to the main character, Sattelizer L. Bridgette. As a child, she was [[spoiler:sexually abused by her half-brother]], resulting in her having a [[HatesBeingTouched paralyzing fear of being touched]]. At her mother's deathbed, she was told to never give up and not take shit from anyone any longer, and a little later on she became a SuperSoldier Action Girl. However, rather than this solving all her problems as per this trope it ''did not help at all'', as this did nothing for her fear and resulted in her savagely beating the crap out of anyone who came close to her, causing her to be feared and hated by all. It's only when she falls in love with a ''male'', [[NonActionGuy Aoi Kazuya]], [[SingleWomanSeeksGoodMan the first guy to be nice to her]], that she slowly starts to get over her problems and work on them.
* Rico in ''Manga/GunslingerGirl'' isn't used to wearing dresses. When she's forced to wear a dress in order to move unnoticed in an opera house in order to assassinate her target she says that a dress is "too loose." It may be more understandable in her case: she loathes the idea of being restrained in any way [[spoiler: since she's an ex IllGirl who was in an hospital bed for years.]]
* Inverted with Pao-Lin aka Dragon Kid of ''Anime/TigerAndBunny'', who is being pressured to act ''less'' masculine because her corporate sponsor thinks it would make her more popular. [[spoiler: In the GrandFinale she wears a sundress and hairclips, but it's less about sponsors and ''much'' more about [[SheCleansUpNicely looking nice while going out with Mom and Dad]].]]
* Played with in ''Manga/AttackOnTitan''. While the female soldiers are fairly androgynous in uniform, the majority have long hair and wear long skirts or dresses whenever they are out of uniform. On the other hand, we also have the TomboyAndGirlyGirl pair of [[BadassGay Ymir]] and [[HairOfGoldHeartOfGold Christa]] playing things straight. [[AllThereInTheManual Side notes]] point out that because soldiers [[WaifFu fight]] using acrobatics, female soldiers have an enormous advantage over their male counterparts, due to being smaller and lighter.
%%Do not respond to this example. This page is in-universe.
* Subverted in ''{{Sekirei}}'',
** The titular HumanAliens draw their strength from ThePowerOfLove and are primarily female. Musubi wears a pink skirt, a massive bow tied around her waist, and enjoys cooking. She's also a CuteBruiser capable of leveling a building with a single punch. The most powerful Sekirei? [[spoiler: Miya Asama, a beautiful housewife that retired in order to settle down with her late husband.]] She's still a PersonOfMassDestruction, without sacrificing an ounce of her femininity.
** The guys are not immune to this. The most powerful male Sekirei? Shiina, an adorable, effeminate boy [[DudeLooksLikeALady that you could mistake for a woman.]]
* {{Suisei No Gargantia}}: The female characters regularly involved in combat or important tactical decisions normally wear pants or shorts: this includes Bellows, Ridget, and the female soldiers seen during the opening sequence. In contrast, Amy, her friends, and other "noncombatants" who aren't capable of contributing much when pirates or whatnot invade are normally shown wearing skirts. This is somewhat subverted in that Amy turns out to be a lot tougher than she looks (as seen in the final episodes).
* {{Manga/Bleach}} does this in-universe, to a certain extent. While Rukia Kuchiki and Orihime Inoue both have feminine tastes and dress, Rukia has a lower voice in the anime, did not have close female friends until going to the human world, wears her hair short, and has a tough-love way of relating to her friends. Orihime meanwhile is the gentle, dreamy healer with long hair and a very high-pitched voice in the anime. Take a wild guess which of the two is the main ActionGirl, and which one was portrayed as having self-confidence issues for the bulk of the series so far.
** However, this is discussed/inverted with tomboy [[HeroOfAnotherStory Tatsuki]] and Orihime in the beginning, when Orihime has her speech about how it is her turn to protect Tatsuki instead of the other way around.
* Very literal example in ''OnePiece''. Since Nami got the Perfect Clima-Tact, she has become better and better at fighting, often proving her worth as an ActionGirl as well as the crew's navigator (and DamselInDistress). Likewise, she hasn't worn dresses or skirts ever since Thriller Bark (that's well over 200 chapters, quite noteworthy since her regular outfit used to be a t-shirt and a miniskirt) which is the arc after she got the Clima-Tact.
** However, Robin, who is stronger and smarter than Nami, does often wear dresses.
* Pre-Eclipse Casca of {{Berserk}} is an ActionGirl (the only girl, and second-in-command of the Band of the Hawk) with only one scene where she's out of her armor (at a ball, where her companions see her in a dress for the first time and can only stare at this perversion of everything they know to be true). Post-Eclipse, she's reduced to the level of a two-year-old, and wears a peasant dress for practical reasons.
* Played with in ''PrincessKnight''. While Princess Sapphire and the lady knight Friebe do their best asskicking while in masculine clothes, Sapphire feels far more comfortable in feminine attire and it's implied that this is the way that's best for her. Friebe, meanwhile, is heroic and is almost always seen in her armor, but wears a dress and brags about her ability to cook and sew as a selling point to convince [[SweetOnPollyOliver Sapphire]] to marry her. Played straight with Hecate, who enjoys the carefree life she lives, while her mother's attempts to force her to turn into a proper lady are shown as quite villainous.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Comic Books]]
* The creation of ''Franchise/WonderWoman'' was William Moulton Marston's attempt to address this in society:
--> "Not even girls want to be girls so long as our feminine archetype lacks force, strength, and power. Not wanting to be girls, they don't want to be tender, submissive, peace-loving as good women are. Women's strong qualities have become despised because of their weakness. The obvious remedy is to create a feminine character with all the strength of Superman plus all the allure of a good and beautiful woman."
* Parodied in Rick Veitch's ''Brat Pack'', with StrawFeminist superhero Moon Maiden. As she teaches her sidekick Lunar Lass, emotion and weakness are one and the same to warrior women. Attachments and relationships are for little girls and weaklings. When Lunar Lass gets pregnant, Moon Maiden freaks and speechifies about how a warrior woman needs no one, especially not a child. So she forces her to give herself an abortion with a wire hanger because she can't be a strong or respectable woman if she has a baby.
* Parodied as early as the 1950s, with "[[ProperLady perfect little lady]]" Janie Jackson teased and compared unfavorably to the superheroine Tomboy ("That's what I call a real girl!") by her older brother, who [[LovesMyAlterEgo never realised that Janie and Tomboy were the same person.]]
* The Argentinian comic strip ''ComicStrip/{{Mafalda}}'': As Mafalda's ideas on women's rights were advanced by the standards of TheSixties and TheSeventies, they come as [[StrawFeminist more rude and stuck-up than well-intentioned]] to modern reader, especially when she constantly and very rudely tells her HouseWife mother Raquel that she's "useless" and "mediocre" because she chose to raise Mafalda at home than juggle with work/college and motherhood.
* ''ComicBook/AlbedoErmaFelnaEDF'': Averted in one story where Erma finds out, with Toki's coaxing, that she finds that occasionally indulging her feminine side, like buying and wearing a sexy dress and attracting the appreciative stares of males, is fun. However, she still is no less a soldier on this kind of off-time such as she spots a possible terrorist with a gun and she and Toki have him covered with their own side arms instantly. It turns out to be only a camera with a pistol grip, but everyone assures Erma that it was a reasonable call.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Fanfiction]]
* It’s common in fanfiction that the male lead chooses the {{Tomboy}} over the GirlyGirl because the latter is considered “weak” for liking fashion, make-up, shopping and other feminine things. According to shippers, women are superior when they're outgoing, emotionless, can put up a fight, and most importantly, [[TitleDrop don’t wear dresses]]. Girly girls, on the other hand, are stripped away of their personality so that they only cry, whine and care about their appearances, making the male lead ([[AmazonChaser and other men]]) make a beeline for the tomboy. This only happens to the girly girl because, in the eyes of the author, a skirt automatically makes her a doormat [[DieForOurShip and to make the tomboy look better]].
* ''Fanfic/FrigidWindsAndBurningHearts'' tries to avert this trope by having Storm Cloud (a pegasus mare in the Royal Guard) and Rarity (a fashion designer) argue over the significance of Cutie Marks, which show up when a pony finds what they're destined for. Storm Cloud's is a spear, and thus she joined the Guard; when she chews out Rarity for criticizing her masculine behavior, Rarity points out that Storm Cloud just blindly went with her Cutie Mark, while Rarity ignored the implications of hers (three gems) and went into design, making her the stronger of the two. The problem is that the fic ''radically'' misinterprets Rarity's mark by claiming it symbolizes mining; she got it after ''using gems in dress design'', not ''finding'' the gems in a rock.
* In ''FanFic/AnAlternateKeitaroUrashima'', Makoto dismisses Miyabi's opinion simply because she happens to be Keitaro's girlfriend. Similarly, she and Naru immediately turn on the newest tenant when she reveals she has a boyfriend.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Film]]
* Casey's mother from the Disney film ''Film/IcePrincess'' says, "I know ice skating requires a great deal of athleticism and skill, but I just can't get past the twinky little outfits." Never mind that male ice skaters wear outfits that are almost as "twinky" and in some cases even "twinkier". Also she's saying this about a sport that is dangerous on the level of gymnastics but metal blades! This being a Disney film, by the end of the movie the mother realizes she was wrong.
* ''Film/{{Twister}}'' has the love triangle between Bill Harding's estranged wife, a down-to-earth country woman, and his stylish new fiance. Guess who handles the tornadoes better.
* Lisa (Creator/GraceKelly) frequently wears {{Pimped Out Dress}}es in ''RearWindow'', but after she risks her life to help expose the murderer, she wears a blouse and blue jeans in the closing scene. She also does this to impress her boyfriend, who thinks she couldn't adapt to his lifestyle.
* In the 1967 film ''Film/BonnieAndClyde'', Blanche Barrow is portrayed as TheLoad in contrast to Bonnie Parker and, in the real Blanche's own words, [[HystericalWoman "a screaming horses's ass."]] Significant in that the two male leads, Clyde Barrow and Buck Barrow, aren't foiled against each other to the same extreme.
* In ''Film/SmallSoldiers'' Alan's mother is contrasted with Kristy's. Alan's has short hair, mostly wears pants and when the Commandos attack she fights them off. Kristy's mother is long haired, notably spends most of the film [[PinkMeansFeminine in a pink dressing gown]] and willingly hides in the closet when the Commandos are attacking. Also Kristy is presented as a bit of a LadEtte which is shown as a very positive thing. Especially when her Gwendy dolls (which she admits she has always hated) come to life - they are presented as GirlyBruiser fighters and Kristy takes great delight in smashing them up. Nothing at all symbolic about a teenage girl smashing up her doll collection eh?
* In ''Film/{{Enchanted}}'' we have two aversions of this trope. Giselle is a [[GirlyGirl extremely feminine woman]] that waits to be rescued by her Prince and get married, just as any other fairy tale princess, however she later changes her destiny and [[spoiler: saves his loved one from the Evil Queen, stays with the man she really loved and starts a fashion line]]. Nancy, on the other hand, is a very successful professional woman, she is strong and confident, and yet she wears make up and girly clothing.
* ''Film/InAWorld...'': Real Women Don't Talk Like Sexy Babies. The main character starts a voice training course to help women speak in such a way as to be taken seriously as professionals. Which, judging by what we see onscreen, mostly consists of speaking in a lower register... in other words, [[UnfortunateImplications more like a man.]]
* In ''Film/ConanTheBarbarian2011'' Conan makes a crack that wearing a dress makes ActionGirl Tamara look like a whore, then gets her some leather armor. He didn't think this was worthy of comment when they first met, and it's played as a sign she's earned his respect.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Literature]]
* If you want to recognize this trope in romantic novels and/or novels set in other historical periods, look at the female protagonist carefully. Many, MANY authors fall in the trap of trying to make a heroine you can relate to... by having her look down on other women for "being so submissive and stupid" or "losing their time sewing and doing stupid feminine things".
* ''Literature/ATaleOfTwoCities'' plays with it. [[TheIngenue Lucie Manette]] is the ideal of pre-Victorian femininity and pretty damsel in distress. The only badass female character on the side of good, Miss Pross, is described as mannish and so ugly that it doesn't make a difference when she is disheveled after a fight. Madame Defarge is the only major female character portrayed as both womanly and powerful but she's also a villain.
* In-Universe example in ''Literature/HouseOfLeaves'', at one point it summarizes interviews between Karen (who's claiming the events are fictional), and a number of celebrities. One such celebrity is a feminist who chastises Karen's 'character's' nyctophobia, dismissing it with "No self-respecting woman is afraid of the dark".
* Rachel and Cassie are inversions of this trope in the ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'' series. Rachel is the toughest, most blood-thirsty, aggressive warrior of TheTeam and also the more womanly compared to Cassie. She is often described as a leggy, well-dressed, beautiful blonde who loves to go shopping, cares a great deal about outward appearances, often insists on improving Cassie's wardrobe, and goes shopping for the group when clothes are needed on the fly. Cassie on the other hand is the more feminine in nature, broken-hearted for everything that ''breathes'', is the most hesitant to do battle and yet is the one who can't dress.
** In one story, Rachel gets a LiteralSplitPersonality, where she becomes a classic example: Nice Rachel is an ExtremeDoormat who plans out shopping trips like an invasion, Mean Rachel is TheBerserker who threatens to stab a girl who insulted her.
* The ''Spy High'' series, where beautiful, blonde, fashionable Lori is the most ruthless of TheTeam, especially when provoked; the less looks-conscious Cally is TheHeart and eventually wins the love of leading man Ben. Bex, the biggest ActionGirl of the team, rejects feminine dress and looks completely; with punk clothes, many piercings, and short spiky [[YouGottaHaveBlueHair green hair]].
* Quite {{defied}} in the ''Literature/TortallUniverse'' by Creator/TamoraPierce.
** In the first quartet, ''Litearture/SongOfTheLioness'', Alanna starts out hating the fact that she's a girl and wishing she were a boy because she wants to be a knight. She tells her brother that part part of her motivation for the switch is to go towards knighthood and away from ladyhood. Part of her CharacterDevelopment is coming to accept and enjoy her femininity even in the midst of her ''eight-year-long'' stint as a SweetPollyOliver. It does not detract in the least from the fact that she is {{Badass}} and becomes a legendary knight--in the last book, her current lover Liam pitches a fit over her wearing a dress at one point because he can't fit her into a neat stereotype box when she's a warrior ''and'' feminine, serving as a portent to their eventual breakup.
** In one of the short stories, Fedal complains about women of Tekalimy's Islam {{Expy}} religion being forced to wear veils, and she gives a speech about how she ''likes'' wearing them, since it means she isn't judged on her looks. Another short story follows this girl as she speaks for the female side of her god as a prophet, but continues to wear the veil.
** Daine from the ''Literature/TheImmortals'' quartet also hates dresses, but for a different reason: she's a very outdoorsy type and skirts are monstrously impractical. It's for this reason that she absolutely loathes anything with too much frivolous decoration. On the other hand, when she knows in advance she has to dress up and gets to pick a dress she likes, she's shown to enjoy looking pretty from time to time.
** In the ''Literature/ProtectorOfTheSmall'' quarter, Kel is the first girl to openly train to be a knight. She insists on wearing dresses to dinner each evening, just to remind people of her gender.
--> '''Lord Wyldon''': If only you'd been born a boy, Mindelan.
--> '''Kel''': But sir, I ''like'' being a girl.
** In general, the women who aren't {{Action Girl}}s or otherwise warlike are not demonized for knowing and ''enjoying'' feminine things like needlework (and some of the Action Girls are shown doing needlework themselves). The overall [[AnAesop theme]] here is that it's equally okay to be a [[TomboyAndGirlyGirl tomboy or a girly girl]].
* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' is a mixed bag, but the two Stark girls draw an unflattering contrast between masculine and feminine behavior while deconstructing them at the same time. Arya is a tomboy whose interest in swordplay helps her overcome many trials ([[spoiler:which slowly eats away at her humanity until she discards her identity and becomes a literal tool of murder]]), while Sansa, who is better at traditional feminine pursuits, spends half the first book crying helplessly and the other half misreading people. Once she's gotten past her initial idealism, Sansa becomes much more competent, and her femininity and awareness of social customs helps her as she [[spoiler: keeps house for and trains under the series' resident MagnificentBastard]]. The girls' mother Catelyn is a much better blend of confidence and femininity.
* Played with in ''{{Mistborn}}''- heroine Vin, [[TomboyWithAGirlyStreak though she qualifies as a tomboy at heart she has a definite girly side to her]], in spite of her abusive half-brother's best attempts to beat it out. A good chunk of her character arc involves her coming to terms with the fact that she can enjoy dancing and wearing ballgowns and still be a {{Badass}}.
* BrandonSanderson likes to play with this trope; he has a number of female characters that can [[ActionGirl kick ass]], and are also generally comfortable with femininity.
* ''Literature/JaneEyre'': The title character's more conventionally feminine and pretty classmate Helen dies early on. Whether Helen should be thought of as TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth or [[TooDumbToLive not strong-willed enough to survive]] depends on the critic.
* ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia'':
** "The Lion The Witch and the Wardrobe" concludes by saying, in a nutshell, that the two queens (with their appropriately royal dresses) were just as effective and beloved as the two kings.
** In ''The Last Battle'' Susan Pevensie becomes "no longer a friend of Narnia" and the only mention of why is a line saying she's only interested in "lipstick, nylons and invitations". Many readers take this as criticism of female sexuality though CS Lewis said of Susan "The books don't tell us what happened to Susan. She is left alive in this world at the end, having by then turned into a rather silly, conceited young woman. But there's plenty of time for her to mend and perhaps she will get to Aslan's country in the end... in her own way" which, coupled with things other characters say suggest her fault is trying too hard to grow up and forgetting her childhood. The other female characters Lucy, Jill and Polly aren't said to be any less feminine than Susan.
* ''Literature/AnneOfGreenGables'': While the title character is a daring, outspoken FieryRedhead, she is also very concerned with physical beauty, jewelery, and fairies. Her assertive side and and her imaginative, feminine side are portrayed as mixed bags independently of each other, and at times they overlap.
* In the ''Kitty'' series of children's books, the tomboyish Kitty is frequently at odds with her prissy cousin Melissa who loves pink frilly dresses and ribbons in her hair. When Melissa starts at Kitty's school, she is unpopular with the other kids. Kitty comes back to school after a week off sick and discovers Melissa has cut her hair short and started dressing in baggy tracksuits. She is now popular and liked by everyone.
* Arguably used in Plato's ''{{Republic}}'', where Socrates contends that women have the right to the same education and civic duties as men...just so long as they act identical to men. The idea of educating women the same as men was, however, [[FairForItsDay in its day, so highly progressive as to be considered ridiculous in Athens at the time.]]
* In Discworld/FeetOfClay, Angua tells Cherry (a female dwarf) that you can be any gender you want in the Watch, as long as that gender is male. Immediately subverted when she recounts her own efforts to do so, telling bawdy jokes that caused the others to flee in terror. A later book has her and Nobbs on HoneyTrap duty, with ''[[{{Gonk}} Nobbs]]'' as the HoneyTrap. When she asks him why he's in the dress, Nobbs, DirtyCoward and NonActionGuy, has difficulty with the idea of Angua being the one to put herself in danger (plus, she ''was'' the backup).
* In the ''Sophie'' series by Dick King-Smith, protagonist Sophie is a tomboyish, animal-loving little girl who always looks untidy, and wears jeans and rubber boots. Her designated enemy, the prissy Dawn, wears dresses and pigtails and is mocked by Sophie for being vain.
* ''Literature/PercyJacksonAndTheOlympians'' and its sequel series ''Literature/TheHeroesOfOlympus'' is quite guilty of this. All the most prominent action girls are tough tomboys with a heart of gold, while the stereotypically girly Aphrodite cabin is written off as being weak, shallow fighters. Its most prominent member Silena is given depth and characterization, but is also [[spoiler: revealed to be TheMole, having been seduced by a villain]]. In the sequel series, Piper is revealed to be one of them, and expresses disdain for their shallowness, vanity, and overall femininity.

[[/folder]]

[[folder:Live Action TV]]
* Sometimes used in Franchise/SuperSentai, which is fond of the TomboyAndGirlyGirl trope: if there are TwoGirlsToATeam, typically the Pink (or White) Ranger will be girly and wear skirts/dresses, while the Yellow (or Blue) Ranger will be more tomboyish and wear shorts or pants. Early series would lean towards making the tomboy the stronger warrior, while the girly girl would be more of a pacifist and often have a less powerful weapon.
* Played straight on ''Series/RobinHood'' which saw Djaq, an intelligent, resourceful, competent ActionGirl who always wore pants written out at the end of the second season and [[ReplacementScrappy replaced with]] Kate, a girl who wore an impractically long dress out in the forest, and whose contributions to the outlaw gang included a string of kidnappings, bitching, and a RomanticPlotTumour.
* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': In [[ASongOfIceAndFire the books it's based on]], Arya didn't really have this attitude since she was fine with other girls being girly and didn't really ''hate'' feminine things so much as wish they weren't forced upon her since she is naturally no good at them, which makes her feel self-conscious. The show, however, is a different matter, giving Arya this exchange.
--> '''Tywin:''' Aren't most girls more interested in the pretty maidens from the songs? Jonquil, with flowers in her hair?
--> '''Arya:''' Most girls are idiots.
* In ''Series/CougarTown'', Bobby makes friends with a {{tomboy}} named Riggs. Travis and Grayson turn [[ShipperOnDeck Shippers on Deck]] and try to convince him that Riggs is girlfriend material by [[SheCleansUpNicely making her over]] but when Bobby sees Riggs on a dress, he breaks out laughing because the sight of it is ridiculous to him, "like a dog wearing sunglasses." Rather than feeling embarrased or outraged, Riggs ''agrees'' with Bobby and the two continue their platonic relationship, [[spoiler:which eventually becomes romantic.]]
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Music]]
* Deliberately invoked with a twist in the very NSFW song "Only Straight Girls Wear Dresses" by CWA, in which a LipstickLesbian reads the title in graffiti in a bathroom, finds the perp, and convinces her otherwise; with sex.
* The video for Music/{{Pink}}'s song "Stupid Girls" equates "stupidity" with feminine things such as playing with dolls, putting on make-up and wearing anything pink while equating being smart with being a tomboy and physically strong. The end of the video has a little girl choosing to play football instead of playing with her dolls.
* The Music/TaylorSwift song "You Belong With Me" has the line "she wears short skirts/I wear t-shirts," and "she wears high heels/I wear sneakers," and makes it clear that her close friend's high-heel- and dress-wearing girlfriend doesn't understand him.
* The song "Jolly Old St. Nicholas" has a verse that traditionally goes: "Johnny wants a pair of skates./Susy wants a dolly./Nellie wants a storybook/She thinks dolls are folly." However, complaints got raised that the song was stereotyping all girls to want dolls, even though only Suzy wants a doll while Nellie thinks dolls are stupid. A politically correct version therefore was written, which goes: "Johnny wants a pair of skates./Susy wants a sled./Nellie wants a picture book./Yellow, blue, and red." So Suzy is no longer "stereotyped" but as a result Nellie is now illiterate. Hooray for... improvements?
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Newspaper Comics]]
* ''ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}}'' had Peppermint Patty, the most athletic female character, wear shorts in contrast to the other girls' dresses. Lucy and Sally later stopped wearing dresses in the 1980s.
** A short arc involved Patty's school enforcing a dress code which required her to wear a dress. She was not at all happy about it.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Professional Wrestling]]
* This was turned into a storyline in WWE in 2011 with Wrestling/BethPhoenix and [[Wrestling/NatalyaNeidhart Natalya's]] [[FaceHeelTurn heel turns]], the two of them proclaiming they were sick of the models in WWE. Interestingly on WWE's part, they kept both sides with a sympathetic point of view; Beth and Natalya wanting to make the division more serious and about wrestling while the likes of Wrestling/KellyKelly and Wrestling/EveTorres trying to prove themselves as wrestlers.
* [[http://www.diva-dirt.com/2011/12/21/a-londoners-eye-models-vs-wrestlers-when-did-the-battle-lines-get-drawn-and-why-do-we-have-to-choose/ This article]] discusses this trope in relation to the WWE Divas and offers a neutral stance on the debate.
* On the July 28, 2012 episode of ''Wrestling/RingOfHonor TV'', there was a clip of Wrestling/SaraDelRey attacking Maria Kanellis during a brawl between Eddie Edwards and Mike Bennett. This cut to an Edwards promo where he said that he could do anything he wanted to Mike Bennett but he couldn't put his hands on Maria, so he got someone who could. Sara walked into the scene and called Maria "disgusting. You worry about your hair and your nails when a real woman would break you in half."
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[[folder:Theatre]]
* In-story, [[Theatre/{{Macbeth}} Lady Macbeth]] has this opinion of herself. She calls on evil spirits to make her less feminine and able to kill Duncan.
* At first, ''Theatre/{{Wicked}}'' suggests that the pink-clad Glinda is an AlphaBitch who betrayed the more hard-working and tomboy-ish main character. [[spoiler: The two become best friends, and learn from one-another to overcome their respective faults. The apparent "betrayal" was something both of them were in on.]]
[[/folder]]

[[folder:VideoGames]]
* In-universe example in [[VideoGame/TraumaCenter Trauma Team]]:[[spoiler: in one of the extras, Maria wears a dress. Gabe's response is to try to rip his eyes out.]]
* An In-universe example in ''VideoGame/OdinSphere''. Just about the only thing the [[AmazonBrigade Valkryies]] of Ragnanival fear is getting married because it usually entails getting hit with a love spell and falling for the first man she sees (usually a man she is ''given'' to). Gwendolyn thankfully lucks out in that Oswald likes her just as she is, and is badass enough to beat down everyone else after her; she's ''not'' so lucky in that Oswald is a little too afraid of her ''not'' loving him if she finds out she was never under that spell to begin with and never tells her.
* Curiously inverted in ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' with Veronica Santiago. She's a Brotherhood Scribe who isn't afraid to question the patriarchal Brotherhood's outdated beliefs, admits to having fallen in love with another woman once, and can floor a deathclaw with her fists. Her greatest wish is... to wear a dress because she wants to look good and sexy for once. She's genuinely grateful if you get her one, and if you find a ''good'' dress, [[{{Squee}} she squeals like a schoolgirl]]. Then she goes back to pummeling the opposition.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Solatorobo}}'', this attitude (and a literal instance) is the whole reason for the photo collection sidequest: [[spoiler:Alicia had a photo taken while wearing a princess dress, and she's so embarrassed by it that she has her gang swipe all the photographer's photos. Waffle eventually sees it and compliments her, but she's offended by the comparison to Princess Theria.]]
* Turned on its head in ''VideoGame/ResonanceOfFate''. As part of her CharacterDevelopment, Leanne decides to start wearing full makeup when knowingly heading into gunfights. Her reasoning is it encourages her to keep her emotions in check, since crying will make it start to run, and by not breaking down she avoids becoming a liability to her partners.
** Naturally, this get a very direct LampshadeHanging in ''VideoGame/ProjectXZone'', where after explaining the ritual to [[VideoGame/GodsEaterBurst Lindow]], he states that he can only imagine the reaction some of the women in his unit would have to hearing that.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:VisualNovels]]
* ''VisualNovel/FateStayNight'' deconstructs this trope with LadyOfWar Saber. She pretended to be a man and fought on the front lines of battle for all of her human life. At some level she never wanted to do these things but she accepted them because they were her duty [[spoiler:as KingArthur]]. As a result, she has no sense of self-worth, and can only feel fulfilled by serving other people. The main character Shirou realizes that even though she is a supremely skilled warrior, she would be happier if she didn't ''force'' herself to fight.
* Averted in ''VisualNovel/LongLiveTheQueen''. As one review put it, "You can't make a successful [[GameOfThrones Arya]] without adding a little Sansa."
[[/folder]]

[[folder:WebComics]]
* Debated between skirt-hating StrawFeminist Susan and skirt-loving ActionGirl Nanase in ''Webcomic/ElGoonishShive'' [[http://www.egscomics.com/?date=2006-02-27 here]] (although though both were [[GenderBender transformed into boys]] at the time) with Susan naturally taking the Real Women Don't Wear Dresses side of the argument.
** Susan may be thawing ''slightly''; she did pick a SkirtOverSlacks avatar in one IM conversation (Vanellope Von Schweetz from ''WreckItRalph'').
* KateBeaton mocked this trope with [[http://www.harkavagrant.com/index.php?id=311 "Strong Female Characters"]].
-->'''Strong Female Character''' ''(while punching a {{Housewife}} in the face)'': Your reign of terror is over you cookie baking [[ThisIsForEmphasisBitch BITCH!]]
* Parodied in ''{{Sinfest}}'' when [[http://www.sinfest.net/archive_page.php?comicID=4487 Monique]] [[TenderTears cries over]] a TV show, and gets her "strong woman" card suspended. (Other characters have also had various cards suspended for not behaving stereotypically. For instance, Squigley loses his Bro card after he dares to acknowledge the atheleticism of female tennis players rather than just watching for panty shots.)
* In ''Webcomic/LsEmpire'', Void asks why Daisy wears a dress if she's a tomboy. She responds as such:
-->'''Daisy:''' DID YOU EVER THINK THAT MAYBE I LIKE TO WEAR DRESSES? HUH, DID YOU EVER THINK OF THAT?
* EerieCuties: tomboy Brooke rarely wears skirts or dresses despite having a very practical reason to do so (she occasionally turns into a half-snake and loses her pants to ClothingDamage). Lampshaded by girly-girl Melissa [[http://www.eeriecuties.com/strips-ec/make_a_skirt_for_yourself here]]
[[/folder]]

[[folder: Web Original]]
* Lampshaded in ''WebVideo/YuGiOhTheAbridgedSeries'' in the Episode 15 match between Tea Gardner and Mai Valentine. After dissing the latter for being a flirtatious "bleached blonde," Tea announces, "I'm going to beat you, Mai! And when I do, [[ComicallyMissingThePoint it will prove that women are equal to men!"]]
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Western Animation]]
* ''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad'':
** In the beginning, Francine is practicing for a pie-baking contest, leading Hayley to belittle her and ask her questions like when she plans on giving back the vote. Later at night, Francine catches Hayley, wearing a frilly, outdated dress, baking pies of her own.
** Played with in another episode. Hayley makes a video of Francine, mocking her status as a typical housewife who sews, cooks, and cleans. Francine is distraught and receives a fake doctor's license and then works for the handicapped mafia. Things get out of hand but once Francine takes care of things Hayley apologizes for claiming Francine couldn't do anything important.
* Deconstructed in ''WesternAnimation/WonderWoman''. The Amazons are trained early in life to be warriors, but are secluded from mankind for centuries. Persephone calls Hippolyta out on this near the film's climax. [[spoiler:Diana herself finds a balance towards the movies end. She moves to New York and is in a relationship with Steve, but she still maintains her status as an Amazon and fights crime whenever she's needed.]]
* A DiscussedTrope in the AnimatedAdaptation of ''PrinceValiant'' in which tomboyish Rowanne (who dreams of becoming the first female knight of Camelot) worries that she'll ruin her chances if she's seen dressing and behaving like a girl. Queen Guinevere [[GirlyBruiser assures her that she can be both]] a knight ''and'' feminine when she wants to be.
* ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' episode "A Dog and Pony Show" subverts this as Rarity, the most traditionally feminine of the Mane Six, gets kidnapped and enslaved, only for her to rescue herself by manipulating ([[PityTheKidnapper and annoying]]) the Diamond Dogs into submission, the [[AnAesop Aesop]] being that being feminine doesn't mean being weak. In fact, this is generally averted; tomboys Rainbow Dash and Applejack are not any more competent than the rest of the cast in a crisis ([[TheWorfEffect occasionally less so]]), and Princess Cadance is an extremely pink [[NonActionGuy Non Action Girl]] who has personally vanquished two villains (with a little help from her husband Shining Armor).
[[/folder]]

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