[floatboxright:
Primary Stylistic Influences:
+ PsychedelicRock, ClassicalMusic, {{Jazz}}, {{Folk}}
]

[floatboxright:
Secondary Stylistic Influences:
+ {{Blues}}, AvantGardeMusic, ElectronicMusic and numerous other genres
]

A subset of rock and roll noteworthy for its intricate arrangements and experimental sound. Originating in the late [=1960s=], "Prog Rock" often combines stylistic elements from Classical, Jazz, Folk or sometimes electronic implementations, uses non-standard song structures (including complex rhythms and time signatures) and complex instrumental orchestrations, and frequently employ lyrics which are abstract or [[HeavyMithril fantasy-based]].

The original idea was to bring some of the sophistication of "legitimate" musical styles to rock, which was still regarded as worthless pop trash. Music/TheBeatles' ''Music/SgtPeppersLonelyHeartsClubBand'' featured songs that were (loosely) tied together by a common theme, making it an example of a "song cycle". At around the same time, Music/TheMoodyBlues recorded their ''Days of Future Passed'' album in which a full symphony orchestra accompanied the band and played interludes that connected the songs. [[Music/DeepPurple Imitators]] [[Music/ProcolHarum followed]]. Another major influence on the developing scene was the works of Music/FrankZappa (with and without the Mothers of Invention), especially 1967's ''Music/AbsolutelyFree'', which consisted of two side-long suites borrowing liberally from classical music (especially the works of Music/IgorStravinsky) and including a mini-RockOpera, "Brown Shoes Don't Make It" (described as a "condensed two-hour musical"). Yet another important TropeCodifier was Music/KingCrimson, whose 1969 début album ''Music/InTheCourtOfTheCrimsonKing'' proved to be both commercially successful and influential on the genre.

Classically-trained musicians such as [[Music/EmersonLakeAndPalmer Keith Emerson]] and [[Music/{{Yes}} Rick Wakeman]] started to be drawn to rock, and they brought their repertoire with them. This is where Prog gets its modern image of classically-influenced songs with many extended solos, but Art Rock could refer to any attempt to elevate rock from its lowbrow image. This could include pop music with experimental elements ([[Music/TenCc 10cc]] and Music/RoxyMusic), and bands that used orchestral instruments (Music/ElectricLightOrchestra). Some bands fused with other styles: Music/JethroTull were based on folk music, and the Canterbury bands leaned toward modern jazz. Prog was largely a British phenomenon, although Music/{{Kansas}} and Music/{{Rush}} were significant examples from America and Canada, respectively. The most commercially successful progressive rock band was Music/PinkFloyd, whose 1973 album ''Music/TheDarkSideOfTheMoon'' famously has spent more than over 30 years on the charts and has sold in the tens of millions of copies.

Critics usually dismissed these bands as being [[TrueArtIsIncomprehensible "pretentious"]] (Music/PinkFloyd is the only progressive rock band many rock critics will admit to liking, although even they received their fair share of critical drubbings at the time). Some people just want to have a good time, and prog bands sometimes took themselves far too seriously. Perhaps the most notorious offender was Music/{{Yes}}' ''Tales From Topographic Oceans'' album: it was seen by many as a clear drop in quality from their previous efforts. By stretching a total of four songs ''over 2 [=LPs=]'', even most progressive rock listeners found it to be an exhausting experience to listen to.

Thanks to the rise of [[NewWaveMusic New Wave]] and {{Punk Rock}}, the genre was mostly exhausted by the early 1980's, with the genre's most popular bands like Yes, Music/{{Genesis}}, and Rush shifting towards a more radio-friendly sound in TheEighties, to great commercial success; and the 1982 debut album of the prog supergroup Music/{{Asia}} had radio-ready singles that were huge hits and it was considered the final nail in the coffin for genre in the 80's. Music/PinkFloyd was an exception as they continued to sell millions of records and sell out arenas/stadiums while keeping their sound intact, although even they weren't afraid to embrace {{MTV}} and all the new recording tech that developed throughout the decade. It didn't hurt that the band had already developed a distinctive visual identity through its Creator/{{Hipgnosis}} covers and [[VisualEffectsOfAwesome live shows]]. There was a sub genre that came in the mid-80's called neo-prog, which was basically bands trying to emulate the 70's progressive rock sound with 80's production and [[BlackSheepHit a few power ballads here and there]]. Music/{{Marillion}}, IQ, and [[Music/SpocksBeard Spock's Beard]] were a few examples of neo-prog.

Prog experienced a rebirth around the mid 90's with Music/DreamTheater, Music/PorcupineTree, and Music/TheMarsVolta being some of the new bands to emerge and the classic bands that "went pop" in the 80's started to returned to what made them famous initially. Yes reunited with the classic "Anderson, Howe, Squire, Wakeman, and White" lineup, Genesis tried to go back a more complex sound on the Phil Collins-less ''Calling All Stations'' and [[FanonDiscontinuity failed]] [[CreatorKiller miserably]], and many more bands went back to the longer songs, EpicRocking, and weird lyrics.

Prog Rock was one of the originators, and certainly one of the main motivators, of the ConceptAlbum.

See also ProgressiveMetal for when prog gets ''[[DarkerAndEdgier heavy]]'', and TechnicalDeathMetal for when prog gets ''[[UpToEleven even heavier]]''. {{Krautrock}} is a somewhat more Teutonic variant, which is sometimes considered a subgenre of progressive rock and sometimes its own (albeit related) genre. Also compare BaroquePop, which has been described as being to pop music what prog is to rock, and PostRock and MathRock, which are sometimes regarded as modern-day successors to the genre.

Notable Progressive Rock acts include and are labeled with their respective sub-genre according to the [[http://www.progarchives.com/ ProgArchives]]:

[[index]]
* [[Music/TenCc 10cc]], in the Godley & Creme era (Prog Related/Progressive Pop)
* Music/{{Aghora}} (Tech/Extreme Prog Metal)
* Music/TheAlanParsonsProject (Symphonic Prog)
** 1977 - ''Music/IRobot''
* Music/AmonDuulII (Krautrock)
* Music/{{Amplifier}} (Psychedelic/Space Rock)
* Music/{{Anekdoten}} (Heavy Prog)
* [[Music/{{Anglagard}} Änglagård]] (Symphonic Prog)
* Music/AphroditesChild (Psychedelic/Space Rock)
* Music/{{Area}} (Progressivo Italiano)
* Music/{{Arena}} (Neo-Prog with Progressive Metal leanings)
* Music/AshRaTempel (Krautrock)
* Music/{{Asia}} (Prog Related)
* Attila: A short-lived keyboard-drums combo whose lone album is a frequently-cited contender on "worst album of all time" lists. Featuring THAT Billy Joel.
** ''Music/{{Attila}}'' (1970)
* Music/AtomicRooster (Heavy Prog)
* Music/{{Ayreon}} (Progressive Metal)
* Music/BancoDelMutuoSoccorso (Progressivo Italiano)
* Creator/IsaacBaranoff (Crossover Prog)
* [[Music/BeBopDeluxe Be-Bop Deluxe]] (Crossover Prog)
* Creator/MattBerry (Pshychedelic/Prog Folk)
* Music/BetweenTheBuriedAndMe (Tech/Extreme Prog Metal)
* Music/BiffyClyro (Alternative/New Prog/Prog Metal)
* Music/BigBigTrain (Symphonic Prog)
* Music/BlueOysterCult, mostly on ''Secret Treaties'' and ''Imaginos'' (Prog Related)
** 1974 - ''Music/SecretTreaties''
** 1976 - ''Music/AgentsOfFortune''
** 1977 - ''Music/{{Spectres}}''
* Music/{{BT}} (Progressive Electronic)
* Music/DavidByrne (Crossover Prog, mainly on his soundtrack ''The Catherine Wheel'')
* Music/JohnCale, on some releases (Prog Related)
* Music/{{Camel}} (Symphonic Prog)
* Music/{{Can}} (Krautrock)
* Music/{{Caravan}} (Canterbury Scene)
* Music/{{Chicago}} (Jazz Rock/Fusion; only qualifies as prog on early material)
* Music/ChildrenOfNova (Neo-Prog)
* Music/CitizenCain (Symphonic Prog)
* Music/CoheedAndCambria (Crossover Prog; sometimes Progressive Metal)
* Music/{{Colosseum}} and their later incarnation Colosseum II (Jazz Rock/Fusion)
* Music/{{Comus}} (Prog Folk)
* Music/{{Conception}} (Progressive Metal)
* Music/TheDecemberists, sometimes (Prog Folk)
* Music/DeepPurple recorded at least two "band and orchestra" albums in the late 1960s (Symphonic Prog)
** ''Music/ConcertoForGroupAndOrchestra'' (1969)
* Music/TheDixieDregs, nominally a Southern Rock band (Jazz Rock/Fusion)
* Music/DreamTheater (Progressive Metal)
** ''Music/ImagesAndWords'' (1992)
** ''Music/MetropolisPt2ScenesFromAMemory'' (1999)
** ''Music/TheAstonishing'' (2016)
* Music/DockersGuild (Neo-Prog)
* Music/{{Egg}} (Canterbury Scene)
* Music/ElectricLightOrchestra (at least their pre-''Discovery'' stuff) (Crossover Prog)
* Music/{{Eloy}} (Space Rock)
* Music/EmersonLakeAndPalmer (Symphonic Prog)
** ''Music/PicturesAtAnExhibition'' (1971)
* Music/{{Enslaved}} (Tech/Extreme Prog Metal)
* Music/{{Extreme}} ( Progressive [[FunkMetal Funk]] / HairMetal )
* Music/FairToMidland (Crossover Prog)
* Music/TheFallOfTroy (Heavy Prog, although they're a slight case of NeoclassicalPunkZydecoRockabilly and also count as PostHardcore and other styles)
* Fates Warning (Progressive Metal)
* Music/{{Faust}} (Krautrock)
* Music/TheFlowerKings (Symphonic Prog)
* Flower Travelin' Band (Heavy Prog, also arguably an UrExample for metal along with Black Sabbath)
* Music/{{Focus}} (Symphonic Prog)
* [[Music/{{Frost}} Frost*]] (Neo-prog)
* Music/JohnFrusciante (former Music/RedHotChiliPeppers guitarist)
* Music/{{Gazpacho}} (Crossover Prog)
* Music/{{Genesis}} up to Wind & Wuthering (and the occasional song afterward) (Symphonic Prog)
** ''Music/TheLambLiesDownOnBroadway'' (1974)
* Music/{{Gentle Giant}} (Eclectic Prog)
* Music/GoldenEarring (Prog Related)
* Music/{{Gong}} (Canterbury Scene in the Daevid Allen era; Jazz/Rock Fusion in the Pierre Moerlen era)
* Music/GordianKnot (Experimental/Post-Metal and Jazz-Rock/Fusion)
* Music/{{Haken}} (Progressive Metal as well)
* Music/RoyHarper (Prog Folk)
* Music/HatfieldAndTheNorth (Canterbury Scene)
* Music/{{Hawkwind}} (Psychedelic Rock/Space Rock)
* Music/HenryCow (Avant-Prog/Canterbury Scene/Rock In Opposition)
* [[Music/{{IQ}} IQ]] (Neo-Prog)
* Music/{{Jadis}} (Neo-Prog)
* Music/LosJaivas (Prog Folk, Avant-garde Music)
* Music/JethroTull (Prog Folk)
** ''[[Music/AqualungJethroTullAlbum Aqualung]]'' (1971)
* Music/{{Journey}} prior to 1978 (Prog/Fusion)
* Kaipa (Symphonic Prog)
* Music/{{Kansas}}: a relative rarity who could compose successful commercial songs, but whose core material was more similar to Yes or King Crimson. Later overlapped with ChristianRock (Symphonic Prog)
* Music/KayoDot (listed as RIO/Avant-Prog on their Prog Archives page, although this [[GenreRoulette really depends on the release]])
* Music/{{Khan}} (Canterbury Scene)
* Music/KingCrimson (Eclectic Prog)
** ''Music/InTheCourtOfTheCrimsonKing'' (1969)
* Music/{{Koenjihyakkei}} (Zeuhl)
* Music/LiquidTensionExperiment (Progressive Rock/[[ProgressiveMetal Metal]]/Jazz Fusion)
* Music/ArjenAnthonyLucassen (Crossover Prog/Progressive Metal)
** 1995-current - ''Music/{{Ayreon}}''
** 2012 - ''Music/LostInTheNewReal''
* Music/{{Magma}} (Avant-Prog/Zeuhl; TropeMaker and TropeNamer for Zeuhl)
* [[Music/JohnMcLaughlin Mahavishnu Orchestra]] (Jazz Rock/Fusion)
* Music/{{Marillion}} (Neo-Prog)
* Music/{{Marmozets}} (New-Prog)
* Music/TheMarsVolta (Heavy Prog)
* Music/{{Mastodon}} (Tech/Extreme Prog Metal)
* Music/MenOfLake (Progressivo Italiano)
* Music/JoniMitchell on her mid-late '70s albums (Jazz Folk/Fusion; only albums that fit this style are listed)
** 1974 - ''Court and Spark''
** 1975 - ''The Hissing of Summer Lawns''
** 1976 - ''Music/{{Hejira}}''
** 1977 - ''Don Juan's Reckless Daughter''
** 1979 - ''Mingus''
** 1980 - ''Shadows and Light'' (live album)
* Music/NealMorse (Christian Progressive Rock)
* [[Franchise/TalesSeries Motoi Sakuraba]]; he was part of a few bands before doing video games (Symphonic Prog)
* Music/{{Mountain}} (Crossover Prog)
* Music/{{Mudvayne}} (Progressive Metal)
* Music/{{Muse}} (Prog-Related/New Prog)
* Music/NationalHealth (Canterbury Scene)
* Music/{{Nektar}} (Crossover Prog/Symphonic Prog)
* [[Music/{{Neu}} Neu!]] (Krautrock)
* Music/TheNice; Keith Emerson's first group, before joining Emerson, Lake & Palmer.
* Music/{{Oceansize}} (Space Rock)
* Music/MikeOldfield (Eclectic Prog, most often crossing over with WorldMusic or NewWaveMusic)
** 1973 - ''Music/TubularBells''
* Music/{{Opeth}} (Tech/Extreme Prog Metal; genre shifted to symphonic prog starting with ''Heritage'')
* Music/OrphanedLand (Experimental/Post-Metal)
* Music/{{Pallas}} (Neo-Prog, later Progressive Metal)
* Music/{{Pendragon}} (Neo-Prog)
* Music/{{Phish}} ([[GenreBusting Crossover Prog/Jazz/Blues/Funk/Psychedelic/etc.]]) - they were at their proggiest in the late 80s and early 90s, but they still utilize unconventional time-signatures, glissandi and other techniques typically associated with prog. They also are largely known for their {{Epic Rocking}} and improvisation, with many recorded jams stretching over the 30 minute mark.
** 1989 - Junta
** 1990 - Lawn Boy
** 1992 - Picture of Nectar
** 1995 - A Live One
** 2001 - Live Phish Vol. 1 (Recorded 12/14/1995)
** 2001 - Live Phish Vol. 2 (Recorded 7/16/1994)
** [[ArchivePanic And many, MANY more.]]
* Music/PinkFloyd (Space Rock according to Progarchives, but that only applies to the early stuff, pure prog on the later stuff)
** 1967 - ''Music/ThePiperAtTheGatesOfDawn''
** 1968 - ''Music/ASaucerfulOfSecrets''
** 1969 - ''Music/{{More}}''
** 1969 - ''Music/{{Ummagumma}}''
** 1970 - ''Music/AtomHeartMother''
** 1971 - ''Music/{{Meddle}}''
** 1972 - ''Music/ObscuredByClouds''
** 1973 - ''Music/TheDarkSideOfTheMoon''
** 1975 - ''Music/WishYouWereHere''
** 1977 - ''Music/{{Animals}}''
** 1979 - ''Music/TheWall''
** 1983 - ''Music/TheFinalCut''
** 1987 - ''Music/AMomentaryLapseOfReason''
** 1994 - ''Music/TheDivisionBell''
** 2014 - ''Music/TheEndlessRiver''
* Music/PorcupineTree (Heavy Prog; but most of what you can say about Floyd can also be said - and has also been said, some of it by Steven Wilson himself - about Porcupine Tree; later became Progressive Metal)
* Music/PremiataForneriaMarconi (Progressivo Italiano)
* Music/ThePrettyThings
** ''Music/SFSorrow'' (1968)
* Music/ProcolHarum (Crossover/Symphonic Prog)
* Music/{{Quatermass}} (Progressive/Hard rock)
* Music/{{Queen}} (Prog Related/Heavy Prog) Early stuff, but would switch later on.
* Music/{{Queensryche}} (Progressive Metal)
** ''Music/OperationMindcrime'' (1988)
* [[Music/LesRallizesDenudes Les Rallizes Dénudés]]
* Music/{{Renaissance}} (Symphonic Prog)
* Music/TheResidents (Avant-Prog, more precisely NeoclassicalPunkZydecoRockabilly)
* Music/JorgeReyes (Originally of the Mexican PsychedelicRock scene, later Avant-Prog/Prog-Folk)
* ''Riverside'' (Progressive Metal)
* Music/RoxyMusic (Crossover Prog)
** ''Music/ForYourPleasure'' (1973)
* Music/JordanRudess
* Music/{{Ruins}} (Zeuhl)
* Music/ToddRundgren, especially with Utopia (Crossover Prog)
* Music/{{Rush}} (Heavy Prog on their late 70's albums)
** ''Music/{{Rush|Album}}'' (1974)
%%** ''Music/FlyByNight'' (1975)
%%** ''Music/CaressOfSteel'' (1975)
** ''[[Music/TwentyOneTwelve 2112]]'' (1976)
** ''Music/AFarewellToKings'' (1977)
** ''Music/{{Hemispheres}}'' (1978)
** ''Music/PermanentWaves'' (1980)
** ''Music/MovingPictures'' (1981)
** ''Music/{{Signals}}'' (1982)
** ''Music/GraceUnderPressure'' (1984)
** ''Music/PowerWindows'' (1985)
** ''Music/HoldYourFire'' (1987)
** ''Music/{{Presto}}'' (1989)
** ''Music/RollTheBones'' (1991)
** ''Music/{{Counterparts}}'' (1993)
** ''Music/TestForEcho'' (1996)
** ''Music/VaporTrails'' (2002)
** ''Music/SnakesAndArrows'' (2007)
** ''Music/ClockworkAngels'' (2012)
* '' Music/{{Saga}}'' (Symphonic Prog)
* Music/JoeSatriani; (Well, some of his work, at least.) (Heavy Prog)
* Music/TheSmashingPumpkins, ''Music/MellonCollieAndTheInfiniteSadness'' being the best example (Crossover Prog/Heavy Prog, with a touch of Progressive Electronic)
** ''Music/SiameseDream'' (1993)
** ''Music/MellonCollieAndTheInfiniteSadness'' (1995)
** ''Music/{{Adore}}'' (1998)
* Music/SoftMachine (Canterbury Scene)
* Music/SoundHorizon (Symphonic Prog. [[GenreRoulette Usually]].)
* Music/SpocksBeard (Symphonic Prog)
* Music/{{Styx}}, a poppier version of the sound, but progressive nonetheless (Crossover Prog)
* Music/StatusQuo (their early albums/Crossover Prog)
* Music/SteelyDan (Jazz-Rock/Fusion)
* Music/{{Supertramp}} (Crossover Prog)
* Music/SymphonyX (Progressive Metal)
* Music/TangerineDream (Progressive Electronic, also Krautrock)
* Music/ThirtySecondsToMars
** ''Music/ThisIsWar'' (2009)
* Music/{{Tool}} (Experimental/Post-Metal)
* Music/{{Transatlantic}} (Symphonic Prog)
* Music/TransSiberianOrchestra (Crossover Prog)
** ''Music/BeethovensLastNight'' (2000)
* Music/{{Triumvirat}} (Symphonic Prog)
* Music/TwelfthNight (Neo-Prog)
* Creator/NobuoUematsu with his bands The Black Mages and Earthbound Papas (Progressive Metal)
* Music/{{Ulver}}, on some releases (defined by PA as PostRock[=/=]MathRock, though [[GenreRoulette it really depends on the release]])
* Music/UndergroundZero (Psychedelic Rock, Hawkwind-style)
* Music/UniversZero (Avant-Prog/Rock In Opposition)
* Music/UriahHeep (Heavy Prog)
* Music/SteveVai (Prog Related)
* Music/VanDerGraafGenerator, even if they themselves dispute this (Eclectic Prog)
* Music/VelvetUnderground (Proto-Prog/Proto-Punk)
** 1967 - ''Music/TheVelvetUndergroundAndNico''
** 1968 - ''Music/WhiteLightWhiteHeat''
** 1969 - ''Music/TheVelvetUnderground''
** 1970 - ''Music/{{Loaded}}''
* Music/{{Voivod}} (Tech/Extreme Prog Metal)
* Music/StevenWilson
* Music/RobertWyatt (Canterbury Scene, Jazz Fusion)
* Music/{{Yes}} (Symphonic Prog)
* YUP
** ''Music/ToppatakkejaJaToledonTerasta'' (1994)
* Music/FrankZappa has been described as such (Avant Prog)
** ''Music/FreakOut'' (1966)
** ''Music/AbsolutelyFree'' (1967)
** ''Music/LumpyGravy'' (1968)
** ''Music/WereOnlyInItForTheMoney'' (1968)
** ''Music/CruisingWithRubenAndTheJets'' (1968)
** ''Music/UncleMeat'' (1969)
** ''Music/HotRats'' (1969)
** ''Music/BurntWeenySandwich'' (1970)
** ''Music/WeaselsRippedMyFlesh'' (1970)
** ''Music/ChungasRevenge'' (1970)
** ''Music/FillmoreEastJune1971'' (1971)
** ''Film/TwoHundredMotels'' (1971)
** ''Music/JustAnotherBandFromLA'' (1972)
** ''Music/WakaJawaka'' (1972)
** ''Music/TheGrandWazoo'' (1972)
** ''Music/OverNiteSensation'' (1973)
** ''Music/{{Apostrophe}}'' (1974)
** ''Music/RoxyAndElsewhere'' (1974)
** ''Music/OneSizeFitsAll'' (1975)
** ''Music/BongoFury'' (1975)
** ''Music/ZootAllures'' (1976)
** ''Music/ZappaInNewYork'' (1978)
** ''Music/StudioTan'' (1978)
** ''Music/SleepDirt'' (1978)
** ''Music/SheikYerbouti'' (1979)
** ''Music/OrchestralFavorites'' (1979)
** ''Music/JoesGarage'' (1979)
** ''Music/TinseltownRebellion'' (1981)
** ''Music/ShutUpNPlayYerGuitar'' (1981)
** ''Music/YouAreWhatYouIs'' (1981)
** ''Music/ShipArrivingTooLateToSaveADrowningWitch'' (1982)
** ''Music/TheManFromUtopia'' (1983)
** ''Music/ThemOrUs'' (1984)
** ''Music/ThingFish'' (1984)
** ''Music/FrankZappaMeetsTheMothersOfPrevention'' (1985)
** ''Music/DoesHumorBelongInMusic'' (1986)
** ''Music/{{Guitar}}'' (1988)
** ''Music/BroadwayTheHardWay'' (1988)
** ''Music/TheBestBandYouNeverHeardInYourLife'' (1991)
** ''Music/MakeAJazzNoiseHere'' (1991)
** ''Music/{{Lather}}'' (1996)
[[/index]]

Tropes frequently associated with progressive rock include:

* ArtifactTitle: One explanation for the genre's name is that it came from the "progressive" FM radio stations it was played on in the U.S. These were so-called because the [=DJs=] would, between playing the bands' latest ''magna opera'', spend almost as much time as the songs themselves took to play discussing politics from a progressive (i.e., very leftish) perspective. The name for the subgenre has remained even as the stations became increasingly all about the music and left the politics behind, and even as FM radio of the early 1970s evolved into today's classic-rock format. This explanation, however, is [[RashomonStyle disputed]]; another holds that the progressive rock genre and the progressive rock radio format got their names separately, and that the genre was named because it was perceived to be "progressing" rock music. In this explanation the genre got its name from "progressive pop", which was used at the time to describe what today is generally known as BaroquePop, and it later became a synonym for rock music in general.
* {{Bookends}}: If you're listening to a concept album, odds are at least fifty-fifty that it's going to feature at least one example of this trope. Even if it's not a concept album, the trope may show up anyway.
* BritishRockstar: Most of the bands hailed from the U.K. and helped form the stereotype of British rock stars as drug-addled {{cloudcuckoolander}}s. The genre was so popular in the U.K. for awhile that even artists not commonly associated with prog sometimes recorded songs in the style; for example, Music/LedZeppelin's "Achilles Last Stand" (from ''Presence'') is often considered a progressive rock song, while Music/EltonJohn recorded "Funeral for a Friend/Love Lies Bleeding" and much of ''Madman Across the Water'' in the style.
* ConceptAlbum: Developed somewhat in tandem with prog rock. The Mothers of Invention, Music/FrankZappa's band, were responsible for many of rock's early concept albums.
* ConLang: Practically ''de rigeur'' in zeuhl. Examples include Music/{{Magma}}, Ruins, and Koenjihyakkei.
* DeadHorseGenre: Critics, who usually believe in ThreeChordsAndTheTruth, have tended to hate the genre. This is probably influenced by Lester Bangs' and Robert Christgau's disdain for prog. A prominent exception is Allmusic, which has given several famous prog albums the maximum rating of five stars, as is the Italian writer Creator/PieroScaruffi, who ranks prog albums as two of his top three albums ever made (three of three if you count Beefheart as prog). Pitchfork has been known to give prog records good reviews on occasion as well [[note]]for example, it gave a 9/10 rating to Music/{{Yes}}' ''Close to the Edge'', a 9.4/10 rating to Music/PinkFloyd's ''Music/ThePiperAtTheGatesOfDawn'' - which might have been a 10/10 if they had perceived the reissue to be of higher quality - and a 10/10 rating to Music/PinkFloyd's ''Music/{{Animals}}''[[/note]], but on the whole it much more frequently lambastes them. And, for that matter, even Christgau has given good reviews to prog records on occasion (Music/HenryCow, Music/PinkFloyd, Music/KingCrimson, etc.).
* EpicRocking: Naturally, given the song lengths. Often more focus on "epic" than rocking, obviously.
** The Music/JethroTull albums ''Thick as a Brick'' and ''A Passion Play'' contained one song each, broken up by an interlude that allowed the listener to flip the record.
** Music/MikeOldfield has done this multiple times. Take, for example, ''Incantations'', seventy-three minutes split over four sides, without interludes to let the listener to flip the record. As a result [[TropesAreNotBad it works very well on CD]].
** Robert Fripp (of Music/KingCrimson)'s collaborations with Music/BrianEno probably bear mentioning here as well; they are typically comprised of a single track split across multiple album sides. However, they are as much an example of the {{ambient}} genre as they are of progressive rock.
** Many other bands similarly record albums that effectively consist of one track, or at least multiple side-length pieces, but divide it into separate movements for ease of CD navigation (or, during the heyday of vinyl, because it resulted in [[MoneyDearBoy higher royalties]]). Examples include Music/{{Magma}} (around half their output), Music/{{Camel}} (''The Snow Goose''), Music/HatfieldAndTheNorth (basically both their official full-length albums, although "Mumps" stands out for being twenty minutes long on its own), Music/FrankZappa (''Music/AbsolutelyFree''), Music/DreamTheater (the second disc of ''Six Degrees of Inner Turbulence'' is a single song divided into eight tracks), and Music/PorcupineTree (the main suite of ''The Incident'' is around an hour long, although it has four additional songs included with it). Music/PinkFloyd could be considered an example as well, although theirs often feel more like several songs stitched together with FadingIntoTheNextSong. Other albums, such as ''Third'' by Music/SoftMachine and ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'' by Music/{{Yes}}, as well as much of Music/TangerineDream's output, consist of one song per LP side, but they are counted as separate songs.
** The side-length piece is a staple of progressive rock; particularly acclaimed examples include "Music/SuppersReady" by Music/{{Genesis}}; "Close to the Edge" and "The Gates of Delirium" by Music/{{Yes}}; "Nine Feet Underground" by Music/{{Caravan}}: "A Plague of Lighthouse Keepers" by Music/VanDerGraafGenerator; "Lizard" by Music/KingCrimson; "2112" and "Cygnus X-1 Book II: Hemispheres" by Music/{{Rush}}; "Tarkus" and "Karn Evil 9" by Music/EmersonLakeAndPalmer; "Anesthetize" by Music/PorcupineTree; "The Adventures of Greggery Peccary" by Music/FrankZappa; "Cassandra Gemini" by Music/TheMarsVolta; "A Mind Beside Itself", "Octavarium", and "A Change of Seasons" by Music/DreamTheater; "Grendel" and "Ocean Cloud" by Music/{{Marillion}}; and "Music/{{Autobahn}}" by Music/{{Kraftwerk}}. This is nowhere near a complete list of acclaimed compositions in this vein; feel free to add additional examples.
* FadingIntoTheNextSong[=/=]SiameseTwinSongs: In addition to its liberal use in the genre (Music/PinkFloyd loved it, and other bands such as Music/{{Marillion}} and Music/TheMarsVolta have used it extensively as well), some of the examples of EpicRocking can have a similar feeling to this trope. For example, "Music/SuppersReady" by Music/{{Genesis}} was presumably stitched together from multiple sources (in particular, "Willow Farm" is confirmed to have originally been a separate composition before the band decided to incorporate it into the suite). In addition, if a piece that was treated as a single song for the vinyl era is divided into multiple tracks on a CD release for ease of CD navigation, it will inevitably result in this trope.
* FandomRivalry: With PunkRock, dating back to TheSeventies. Though there are artists who combine elements of both (Music/TheMarsVolta are an excellent example). [[Music/TheSexPistols Johnny Rotten]] admitted to being a fan of prog, and it obviously influenced Music/PublicImageLtd. {{Krautrock}}, particularly Music/{{Can}} and Music/{{Neu}}, was a big influence on PostPunk. Many punk and new wave acts were also heavily influenced by Music/RoxyMusic.
** In truth, the idea of a rivalry between punk and prog ''musicians'' is somewhat a case of historical revisionism. The ''audiences'' of the two genres didn't overlap much at the time, but the musicians themselves weren't as invested in the idea as their fanbases and rock critics were. The idea that the early waves of punk featured sloppy musicianship is mostly due to the example of Music/SidVicious; the other Music/SexPistols were quite competent musicians and simply played ThreeChordsAndTheTruth material because that's what they wanted to play at the time. But, as mentioned, Music/JohnLydon was a big fan of prog bands like Music/{{Magma}}, Music/{{Can}}, and Music/VanDerGraafGenerator, and, despite his "I Hate Music/PinkFloyd" shirt, didn't even hate them (he was just using it to {{troll}} people). The same goes for a lot of other punk bands - Music/TheClash didn't learn to play their instruments with their first album, as is often claimed, and albums like ''Music/LondonCalling'' and ''Music/{{Sandinista}}'' demonstrated what truly sophisticated musicians they were. Some punk bands' music, such as Music/DeadKennedys', almost bordered on prog themselves (listen to "MTV - Get Off the Air" or "Stars and Stripes of Corruption", both of which feature a very prog-like tripartite structure), and it goes without saying that the Kennedys were very skilled musicians. (The prog influence is even more obvious on some of Music/JelloBiafra's solo work, in which he really delves into EpicRocking.) Critics to a certain extent seem to have taken Music/TheRamones' ThreeChordsAndTheTruth style and run with it a bit more than was merited. And it's probably worth mentioning that the genres even have a lot of their roots in common - Music/TheDoors, Music/TheWho, and the Music/VelvetUnderground in particular exerted unmistakable influence on both genres.
* GatewaySeries: A lot of rock fans have gotten into {{classical|music}} and {{jazz}} via prog. Also goes the other way. Plenty of classical and jazz snobs have decided that that "jungle music" isn't so bad after all after discovering prog.
* GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff: The genre is popular in Eastern Europe.
* GeniusBonus[=/=]ViewersAreGeniuses: In addition to the fact that musicians are more likely to appreciate the musicianship there are often all sorts of bizarre subtexts to the lyrics that can't be easily picked up on.
** Also, frequent quotes/covers from the {{classical|music}} and traditional repertoire that might not be familiar to a casual listener.
*** Many references to obscure science fiction and fantasy works will go over the heads of most listeners.
* HeavyMithril: While progressive rock bands aren't necessarily heavy, the use of references to science fiction and fantasy works are not only common, but expected. There's a reason that many progressive rock bands have entries on the [[http://www.sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/sf_music Encyclopedia of Science Fiction ]].
* {{Instrumentals}}: Since most songs either featured long instrumental interludes or solos, this was the next logical step. Depending on the listener [[LoveItOrHateIt this is either the best or worst part of prog-rock]]. Either it shows the musician's true talent as an artist, or it's needless showboating.
* LeadBassist: The genre seems to have a disproportionate number of them, includling [[Music/KingCrimson Greg]] [[Music/EmersonLakeAndPalmer Lake]], [[Music/{{Yes}} Chris Squire]] and Music/RogerWaters, to name a few.
* {{Modulation}}: Many progressive rock songs change key signatures several times, which typically goes hand-in-hand with EpicRocking (it's a good way to hold a listener's attention during a lengthier composition).
* NeoclassicalPunkZydecoRockabilly: It's not uncommon for prog bands to incorporate multiple genres in one song, and in many cases, to incorporate them well. It's worth pointing out that the genre itself started as an example of this trope since it was an attempt to combine rock music with influences from other genres like classical and jazz, and even today, there is a sizable contingent of prog fans who feel that if you don't incorporate this trope into your music, then you're just not doing prog ''correctly''.
** Dixie Dregs in particular stand out for this.
* NeverLiveItDown: The Godley & Creme album ''Consequences'' caused one. It was a triple-disc ConceptAlbum released in 1977; despite being pretty much the only one of its kind during prog's heyday, the phrase "triple-disc concept album" comes up fairly frequently in criticisms of the genre.
** In the popular imagination, prog rock is also 20-minute Mellotron solos.
* OneOfUs: Many prog musicians are science fiction and fantasy fans. On a musical level, they tend to have {{classical|music}} and {{jazz}} backgrounds.
* PurpleProse: Many bands such as Music/{{Yes}} would write songs in a rather flowery fashion. But TropesAreNotBad, not to mention that some bands were actually good at it.
* RecurringRiff: Many concept albums reuse melodies at some points to represent a character, an idea, or a story element. Even some albums that aren't concept albums will use melodies multiple times, which often falls under {{Bookends}}.
* RockOpera: Often goes hand-in-hand with the concept album.
* SongStyleShift: Very common, particularly with "chapter"-structured songs that many prog bands had. The main reason for these chapters was that they were perceived as separate songs [[MoneyDearBoy for royalty purposes]].
* SpiritualSuccessor: PostRock and MathRock. While both genres draw from AlternativeRock and PostPunk, they keep the weirdness of progressive rock, including the odd time signatures and unusual instrumentation.
** Some AlternativeHipHop artists utilize elements of progressive rock as well, such as Music/{{Atmosphere}}, Music/AesopRock, Music/{{Cage}}, Music/{{Caparezza}}, Music/KidCudi, Music/LupeFiasco and Music/KanyeWest (Mainly on ''Music/MyBeautifulDarkTwistedFantasy'', but even before then he had prog elements, e.g. ''Late Registration'''s orchestra).
* TrueArt: What prog musicians were aiming for, with varying degrees of success.
* TallPoppySyndrome: Why U.K. critics hated the genre so much.
* UncommonTime: It would probably take less space to list progressive rock bands that ''don't'' use this trope than to list progressive rock bands that do. It's pretty much a requisite of the genre.
* UpToEleven: Musicianship and complexity of songwriting for starters.
* UrExample: There are plenty of candidates for this. Some artists often cited as precursors of prog include Music/TheBeachBoys, Music/TheBeatles, Music/{{Cream}}, Music/DeepPurple, Music/TheDoors, Music/JimiHendrix, Music/IronButterfly, Music/{{Love}}, Music/{{Spirit}}, and Music/TheWho (although ''Music/{{Quadrophenia}}'' is often considered an honorary prog album, but was released too late to qualify as an Ur-Example). When exactly PsychedelicRock turned into prog is a matter of heavy debate. Prog Archives has the "Proto-Prog" category to list bands that they feel qualify as examples of this trope.
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