[[quoteright:245:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Boschpainting1.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:243:''Series/TheApprentice: The early Years''[[labelnote:*]] "Der Gaukler" by Hieronymus Bosch[[/labelnote]]]]
From printing to the steam engine (1439-1698). The arrival of movable type printing in Europe made books plentiful, and helped standardize the languages that used it. Much more survives from this period than from earlier.

Please note, that when we say steam engine we mean useful steam engine. Not Heron's [[OlderThanFeudalism first century]] toy, and not [[{{Steam}} the store]].

Notable works and authors from this time period include:

* Creator/WilliamShakespeare (see TheZerothLawOfTropeExamples), Creator/ChristopherMarlowe and other authors of Elizabethan/Jacobean drama.
* The works of Creator/JonathanSwift.
* ''Literature/DonQuixote'' by Cervantes.
* The Italian CommediaDellArte farces, establishing many comedy-related tropes we enjoy to this day.
* ''Literature/ParadiseLost'' by John Milton.
* ''Literature/JourneyToTheWest'', the great Chinese epic.
* ''Literature/TheRapeOfTheLock,'' Alexander Pope's great mock-heroic epic satire of the most infamous haircut of English literature.
* The plays of Tāng Xiǎnzǔ (see ''Theatre/ThePeonyPavilion'')
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!! Tropes that originated in this time period:
[[index]]
* AdaptationDisplacement: Some of Shakespeare's plays, such as ''Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet'', displaced older versions of the same stories.
* AffablyEvil: Theatre/{{Hamlet}}, speaking of his uncle Claudius who murdered his father, laments that "one may smile, and smile, and be a villain."
* AllThatGlitters:
[[/index]]
** Shakespeare's ''Theatre/TheMerchantOfVenice'', which implies that it was already an old aesop.
** ''Literature/DonQuixote'', written about eight years after ''The Merchant of Venice'',refers to this trope as "a saying" (Ch. 33), providing another indication that it's really even older.
[[index]]
* AntiHero: Creator/ChristopherMarlowe's Theatre/DoctorFaustus, Shakespeare's Falstaff, and Cervantes' ''Literature/DonQuixote'' are all contenders for the first deliberate example of This Very Wiki's definition.
* ArgumentOfContradictions: May date back as far as CommediaDellArte.
* AsideComment: Creator/{{Shakespeare}} and contemporaries.
* AstroTurf: Fictional example dating back to ''Theatre/JuliusCaesar'' by Creator/WilliamShakespeare
* AtlasPose: The, um, Atlas.
* BadassBystander: The servant who challenges Cornwall in ''Theatre/KingLear''
* TheBluebeard: European literary folktale recorded by Charles Perrault, 1697.
* BefriendingTheEnemy At least as old as the tales of Main/KingArthur when Sir Lancelot befriends Prince Galehaut to end a war over disputed territories.
* BluffingTheMurderer: The play within the play in ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}''.
* BreadEggsBreadedEggs: Polonius's list of genres in ''Hamlet''.
* BromanticFoil: Mercutio of ''Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet''.
* TheCaptivityNarrative: Popular in colonial America, now a ForgottenTrope
* CargoEnvy: In a famous line from ''Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet'', Romeo sees Juliet resting her head on her hand, and wishes he was a glove on that hand.
* CelebrityParadox: In Creator/{{Moliére}}'s 1673 play ''The Imaginary Invalid'', the main character and his brother argue about Moliére.
* TheChessmaster (using actual chess motifs): Iago in ''Theatre/{{Othello}}''.
* ChessmasterSidekick: The literary folktale ''Literature/PussInBoots'' by Charles Perrault, 1695.
* ContrivedCoincidence: ''Theatre/TheComedyOfErrors'' by Shakespeare.
* CounterZany: CommediaDellArte, and Creator/WilliamShakespeare's ''Theatre/MuchAdoAboutNothing''
* CultClassic: Scots poet Creator/RobertBurns and his [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burns_supper annual supper]].
* DealWithTheDevil: ''[[Main/{{Faust}} Historia von D. Johan. Fausten dem weitbeschreyten Zauberer und Schwartzkünstler]]'', 1587; may be older.
* DetectEvil: Shakespeare's ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}''.
* DiamondsInTheBuff: Popular in 16th Century French art.
* DisorganizedOutlineSpeech: ''Theatre/MuchAdoAboutNothing''.
* TheEeyore: Jacques in Shakespeare's ''AsYouLikeIt''. Some critics consider Hamlet to be another example.
* EpistolaryNovel: Existed in the 1600s but became popular with ''{{Pamela}}'', 1740.
* EtTuBrute: ''Theatre/JuliusCaesar'' is the TropeNamer, obviously.
* EvilLawyerJoke: "The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers."--Dick the revolutionary from Shakespeare's ''Theatre/HenryVIPart2''.
* EvilerThanThou: Edmund in ''Theatre/KingLear''.
* ExactEavesDropping: Appears to be at least this old; Shakespeare subverted it in ''Hamlet'' and ''Theatre/{{Othello}}'', and invoked it twice in ''Theatre/MuchAdoAboutNothing''.
* FourTemperamentEnsemble: Has its roots in the 16th Century theory of 'humours', and formed the backbone of a whole genre called the "comedy of humours" (although this related to any comedy where everyone is based on a single FatalFlaw each).
* FriendlyLocalChinatown: The first-ever Chinatown, Binondo in Manila, was founded in 1594. The Chinatowns in Nagasaki ([[CaptainObvious Japan]]) and Hoi An (Vietnam) also date from the 16th century, while Mexico City's arguably dates from the early 17th.
* TheGhost: Rosaline in ''Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet'', Angelo and Marcus Luccios in ''Othello'', and Dulcinea in ''Literature/DonQuixote''.
* GodivaHair: Botticelli's 1486 painting "The Birth of Venus", if not earlier with Lady Godiva herself.
* HeartbrokenBadass: Sir Pelleas over Ettarde in ''Literature/LeMorteDarthur'' by Sir Thomas Malory, c. 1450-1470.
* HeWhoFightsMonsters: Vindice in ''Theatre/TheRevengersTragedy'', 1606
* HourglassPlot: Don Quixote and Sancho in ''Literature/DonQuixote''.
* HumblePie: Called umble pie in the 15th and 16th century.
* IAmSpartacus: ''Theatre/FuenteOvejuna'' by Lope de Vega
* IBangedYourMom: Shakespeare's ''Theatre/TitusAndronicus''
-->Chiron: Thou hast undone our mother.
-->Aaron: Villain, I have done thy mother.
* ICallItVera: The bombard now called "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mons_Meg Mons Meg]]" was first named "Muckle Meg" in 1650 (or in the 16th century, if "Monce" counts as a name instead of an identification of origin).
* ImpededMessenger: Shakespeare's ''Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet''.
* InAnotherMansShoes: Shakespeare's ''Theatre/HenryV''.
* InMyLanguageThatSoundsLike: Shakespeare's ''Theatre/HenryV'', when Princess Katherine is trying to learn "English" from her maid. The English words "foot" and "gown" sound a lot like the French for "fuck" (''foutre'') and "cunt" (''con''). (Helped along by poor pronunciation in the second case.)
* JokerJury: In Vanity Fair in ''Literature/ThePilgrimsProgress''
* {{Jossed}}: Cervantes disproved all the non-canonical novels written by other author(s) featuring his character Don Quixote, going as far as to have the characters in the canonical book read the others and prove them as inaccurate.
* KickMePrank: Cervantes' ''DonQuixote''
* LastVillainStand: Shakespeare's ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}'', with the protagonist's last stand.
* LibertyOverProsperity: First found in ''Literature/ParadiseLost'': Satan would rather reign in {{Hell}} than serve in {{Heaven}}.
* LoanShark: Shakespeare's ''The Merchant of Venice''
* LordErrorProne: ''Don Quixote''
* LoserHasYourBack: Happens to the protagonist in the morality play ''Theatre/{{Everyman}}''.
* LoveAcrossBattlelines: The title characters of ''Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet'', scions of the violently feuding Montagues and Capulets.
* LoveDodecahedron: Shakespeare's ''Theatre/AMidsummerNightsDream'' and ''Theatre/TwelfthNight''
* [[MadScientist Mad Alchemist]]: The precourser to the modern mad scientist.
* MadScientistsBeautifulDaughter (The "mad scientist is good" variant): Shakespeare's ''Theatre/TheTempest'', 1611, even though Prospero is a sorcerer, not a scientist.
* MagicallyBindingContract: Faust's contract with Mephistopheles has to be signed with blood, and can't be broken.
* MagnificentBastard: The eponymous character of Shakespeare's ''Theatre/RichardIII''. {{Satan}} in ''ParadiseLost''.
* {{Malaproper}}: Several Shakespheare comedies.
* MistimedRevival: ''Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet''
* MobileShrubbery: ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}''. "I look'd toward Birnam, and anon, methought, / The wood began to move."
* MonumentalDamage: The Venetians destroyed the Parthenon while invading Greece in 1687 after the Turks filled the entire temple with stores of gunpowder and explosives.
* MoralMyopia: Shakespearean characters, such as Queen Margaret in ''Theatre/HenryVI'' and ''Theatre/RichardIII'', and Tamara in ''Theatre/TitusAndronicus''.
* MoreThanMindControl: ''Literature/TheFaerieQueene,'' ''[[Literature/ThePilgrimsProgress The Pilgrim's Progress]]''
* MST3KMantra: Puck's final speech in ''Theatre/AMidsummerNightsDream'' starts with "If we shadows have offended / Think but this and all is mended..." The speech can essentially be compressed into "It's just a play; cool it, willya?"
* NoFourthWall: Many of Creator/{{Shakespeare}}'s plays, if not earlier.
* OhCrapThereAreFanficsOfUs: Don Quixote and his fellow characters read ''Literature/DonQuixote'' fanfiction novels written by authors other than Cervantes, and complained about whichever parts Cervantes disliked.
* OutDamnedSpot: ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}'' is the TropeNamer.
* OverlyLongGag: Gratiano's repeated ironic echoes of Shylock at the climax of the court scene in ''Theatre/TheMerchantOfVenice''.
* ThePeepingTom: The folk legend of Lady Godiva, in a version from the 17th century.
* PinealWeirdness: Descartes' ''Literature/TreatiseOfMan'', 1629
* PoesLaw: ''EpistolaeObscurorumVirorum'', 1515-1517
* PoseOfSilence: Shakespearean stage production technique.
* PottyEmergency: ''Literature/DonQuixote'' features this joke.
* RapidFireComedy: Shakespeare's comedies, though many of the jokes go unnoticed, due to culture changes, without the body-language context of live performance.
* RashEquilibrium: Shakespeare's ''Theatre/MeasureForMeasure''
* RecursiveCrossdressing: Shakespearean comedy, especially ''AsYouLikeIt''.
* RecursiveCanon: ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' refers to ''Theatre/JuliusCaesar'' as a play.
* RedHerring: Actual red herrings used in hunting.
* ReturningTheHandkerchief: Shakespheare's ''Theatre/{{Othello}}''
* RussianReversal: In Shakespeare's ''Theatre/RichardII'' the title character, reflecting on his reign, laments that "I wasted time, and now doth time waste me."
* ShooOutTheClowns: ''Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet'', ''Theatre/KingLear'', and ''Henry V''
* ShowWithinAShow:[[/index]]
** Type 1: Shakespeare's ''A Midsummer Night's Dream'', ''Theatre/TheTempest'', and ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' (also Type 3).
** Type 2: ''"The Ill-Advised Curiosity"'' in ''Literature/DonQuixote''.[[index]]
* SkeletalMusician: Appear in fifteen century "Dance of Death" art.
* SpontaneousHumanCombustion: The oldest known report of such an incident allegedly occurring dates back to 1654, briefly detailing an incident believed to have occurred sometime between 1468 and 1503.
* AStormIsComing: ''Macbeth''
* StumblingUponTheLostWizard: ''Theatre/TheTempest'' with Prospero as the wizard in question.
* SurrogateSoliloquy: ''Hamlet''
* SwitchedAtBirth: Shakespeare's Theatre/HenryIV wishes out loud that his wayward son Hal had been switched at birth with the honorable rebel Hotspur.
* {{Technobabble}}: ''Theatre/TheAlchemist'' contains rather a lot of baffling alchemical jargon. Some uses it straight to confuse the audience with the cleverness of the characters who understand alchemy, and some is in-universe technobabble employed by charlatans pretending to be actual alchemists.
* ThatCloudLooksLike: ''Hamlet''
* ThoseTwoGuys: Braggadocchio and Trompart in ''Literature/TheFaerieQueene''; Rosencrantz and Guildenstern in ''Hamlet''
* ThroneMadeOfX: In ''Literature/JourneyToTheWest'', the goddess Guanyin makes a throne out of swords and later halbeards to imprison the Red Boy.
* TwentyOneGunSalute: The naval tradition of firing your guns to render yourself unarmed appears to date to the Middle Ages/Renaissance. Probably not OlderThanPrint.
* ViewersInMourning: Remarked upon by Richard Barber in ''Literature/TheKnightAndChivalry''.
* WeddingDay: Shakespeare's ''Theatre/MuchAdoAboutNothing'', or earlier.
* WhenTheClockStrikesTwelve: "Literature/{{Cinderella}}", amongst others.
* AWizardDidIt: ''Literature/DonQuixote'' pokes fun at other works that use the trope in that the [[AscendedFanboy title character]] always ascribes things going sideways to "some cursed enchanter". ''Theatre/TheTempest'' plays it straight, putting essentially the entire plot down to Prospero's magical machinations.
* {{Woolseyism}}: The King James translation of ''Literature/TheBible'' uses this method in many passages. More modern translations such as the New International Version have preserved the most famous ones in only slightly modernized form.
* WrongGenreSavvy: The eponymous character of ''Literature/DonQuixote''.
* ZanyScheme: ''Theatre/MuchAdoAboutNothing'' -- it's one long ping-pong match of schemery.
* ZanySchemeChicken: Creator/WilliamShakespeare's ''Theatre/MuchAdoAboutNothing'' and ''Theatre/TheMerryWivesOfWindsor''
[[/index]]

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