When a fictional work features a politician, or two characters running for an elected position, often the parties they represent are not identified.

If, for example, a movie features a PresidentEvil, identifying their party might make a political statement that the writer does not intend to make. It may simply be a lack of commitment on the writer's part -- the character might espouse views from both sides. In any case, it avoids unnecessarily offending a large portion of the audience.

It sometimes stretches credibility, but sometimes not. [[RealLife Real-life]] politicians in the US often say "Smith for Congress" without mentioning party affiliation, but in Britain campaigns often give the party name, e.g. "Vote Labour/Conservative - vote [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Smith_(politician) John Smith]]" (OK in that case you're voting Labour). Some ballot papers don't name the candidates' parties, as in Britain until 1968, and [[http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/dc-politics/virginia-ballots-skimp-on-party-id/2011/10/21/gIQAHYuuGM_story.html some US elections today]].

A different version of this trope is to have the character be an independent, even though non-affiliation in most Western democracies (especially those with proportional representation, where seats in Parliament are doled out by how many votes a political party has gotten) is fairly rare - even the United States, which does not hand out Congressional seats by party, at the moment only has two Senators who are officially independents (Bernie Sanders and Angus King), both of whom caucus with the Democratic Party (and both from New England, funnily enough), no independent members of the House of Representatives, and even state governors have party affiliations (though county and lower levels of government tend to avoid this).

Compare: FictionalPoliticalParty, PartsUnknown.

----
[[foldercontrol]]

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder: Examples ]]


[[folder:Comic Books]]
* Senator Robert Kelly in the ''ComicBook/{{X-Men}}'' comics and related media. In the two films for example, there is evidence of siding with both parties (i.e. in the first film, he implies that he is for gun control (a Democratic position) for the same reasons he is pro- mutant registration. A deleted scene in the second film implies, by a newspaper clip about a speech that he gives and the Democrats had a response to his speech, that he is a Republican.). The issue is skirted in the comics as well and it falls on the writer of the story to make a hinted alignment. However, seeing as how he is opposed to issues not present in our real world as his only defining political characteristic, it mostly boils down to rhetoric a party would use to justify the reason for the registration.
** However in the "Making Of" featurette of X-Men, called "Mutant Watch", he is given the suffix R-KS, which means that he is a Republican from Kansas.
** In the comics, however, he is canonically from New York, which usually elects Democrats. Add to this the fact that he supports gun control, and uses this as a reason why he also supports mutant registration ("There is no difference!" he says, "All I see is weapons in our schools!"). There's also the fact that the aforementioned "Mutant Watch" special feature had a, um, ''surprise ending'' that was most definitely NOT canon in either the movie or comics.
* ''{{Transmetropolitan}}'' identifies the political parties of the future US as merely "Ruling" or "Opposition."
** Though one panel shows the Smiler in the background identified as D-Callahan, and during the presidential election Callahan is given blue as his states' background colour versus The Beast's red. Given that it's an arbitrary amount of time in the future, there's no real reason to even believe the "D" or the colour blue would still stand for "Democrat".
*** Also, that story arc was published a year or two before the term "red & blue states" came into popular use in the 2000 election; the colors weren't solidly attached to their current parties at that point.
* ''ExMachina'' has Mitchell Hundred running as Independent candidate for Mayor of New York City; his policies lean a bit towards the left, but seem to trend libertarian.
** Throughout the series, he is constantly courted by the Republicans. In the final issue, [[spoiler: he becomes Vice President for a [[AlternateHistory successful]] John [=McCain=]]].
* In one ''CaptainAmerica'' storyline, a news report announces that a senator (who is secretly working for the Red Skull) has left his party to become an independant presidential candidate, without actually saying what his party ''is''.
* When LexLuthor ran for (and won) the presidency, he did it as an independent. But even then, DC was very, ''very'' careful to not say exactly what his political leanings were to one side or the other.
** They were also careful in the {{Armageddon 2001}} annuals (which came out in 1991) to not say which party President Clark Kent represented. (He beat a Supreme Court challenge over "native born American" because in 1991 they were still using the Bryne revamp origin where the ship had carried a gestation chamber rather than a baby, and Clark wasn't born from that womb until after the ship had landed on American soil.)
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Fan Works]]
* Deliberately invoked in ''[[FanFic/UltimateSleepwalker Ultimate Sleepwalker: The New Dreams]]'', which specifically notes that Senator Robert Kelly got elected as an Independent candidate, bankrolled by the anti-mutant movement. J. Jonah Jameson's crusading journalism has given his Democratic '''and''' Republican opponents plenty of ammunition in their quest to regain Kelly's Senate seat.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Film]]
* ''Film/AdviseAndConsent'' makes constant references to the President's party and the opposition, the Majority Leader and the Minority Leader, and even mentions Republicans and Democrats when explaining seating in the Senate, but doesn't say who belongs to which party.
* ''Black Sheep'' identified the party of neither Farley's brother nor the incumbent opponent.
** Likewise, speeches given by both candidates were so vague and filled with meaningless phrases that it was impossible to even guess at either one's party affiliation.
* ''Film/HeadOfState'' goes out of its way not to say which side has nominated Rock's character for the presidency, partly by giving his opponents traits that would work for either party. Among other things, it's mentioned his opponent has been Vice President for 8 years which, since the movie came out in 2004, clears up nothing.
** Rock's former position of being a DC Alderman would strongly imply that he's a Democrat, or an independent, since the Democrats aren't allowed by law to control every seat on DC Council. At the same time, however, his opponent being a cousin to Creator/SharonStone, who is a Democrat, is repeatedly mentioned as a positive trait, which would imply ''he's'' a Democrat.
** Made even harder to ascertain by the fact Lewis wins both Texas (a Republican stronghold) and Michigan (a Democratic stronghold). Of course, there's also the fact that not everyone in a political family belongs necessarily to the same party.
** There is a comic relief member of the unnamed party who keeps mentioning Big Business, clearly indicating the Republican party.
* In ''Film/EscapeFromNewYork'', the President's political party is never mentioned or indicated. There's no mention of his political positions: he's just an uncaring self-absorbed bastard.
** The President in the sequel, ''Film/EscapeFromLA'', however, is very obviously a Republican StrawmanPolitical, as an extreme example of the Religious Right. For example, he orders that all atheists be sent to [[TheAlcatraz Los Angeles]], as well as all prostitutes, and any and all criminals; sex outside of marriage is outright illegal; alcohol is also illegal (teetotalism being a common position in certain Protestant denominations).
* In the 2004 remake of ''TheManchurianCandidate'', the political party involved is never mentioned by name, even during a scene that revolves around a strategy session involving the electoral map. However, it can sort of be inferred from the states that they are mentioned as "traditional weak" and "traditional strong" in that Senator Shaw and her son are Democrats.
** This contrasts with the original, which made them a family of Republicans.
** Although even this has an alternate universe spin on it: the political parties have alternate names in the 2004 version if you pay close enough attention. There's one scene where Senator Shaw's opponent is referred to as "the Conservative nominee", indicating that in the universe of the 2004 movie, the Republicans are instead referred to as the Conservative Party, and implying that the Democrats--and thus the Shaws--are instead referred to as the Liberal Party. The writer's choice to change the party names is definitely a somewhat unusual example.
* In [[Film/StateOfPlay the movie adaptation]] of ''Series/StateOfPlay'', Ben Affleck's character is a congressman whose political party is not mentioned, although he has a painting of DwightDEisenhower in his office. That probably isn't as big a hint as you might think, as Affleck's character is a former military man (Eisenhower is revered by military members regardless of party, and was actually a moderate himself) who went into politics. And he's from Pennsylvania, which is typically a swing state.
* That DisneyChannel movie ''My Date with the President's Daughter''.
* The 1993 film ''Dave'', where Kevin Kline plays both a U.S. President and an impersonator of the same, never mentions a political party. Only a cameo by known Republican Ben Stein (although not even his party is actually mentioned) as himself can allow parties to be indirectly determined.
* In ''Bob Roberts'' the title character is frequently identified as conservative, but rarely as an actual Republican.
* The unnamed and almost unseen President in ''InTheLineOfFire'' doesn't identify with a political party. Signs at his campaign rallies just say "Re-Elect The President".
* President Whitmore in ''Film/IndependenceDay'' has no identified political party. We know he's a Gulf War fighter ace, and a brief reference to a failed "crime bill" is made, but otherwise all we know is that he wants to kick some alien ass.
** The novelization states that he beat a Republican in the election, which makes it likely than not that he's a Democrat. Then again, in the movie itself, Jasmine mentions that she voted for Whitmore's opponent; Jasmine is an African-American woman from Los Angeles, which puts her in various Democratic-leaning demographics, which could indicate Whitmore's being a Republican (either that, or Jasmine being a Republican).
* ''Film/TaxiDriver'' -- Senator Palantine, although his comments suggest that he is a Democrat.
* ''TheDish'' has the Prime Minister mention a party, but he doesn't identify which one. The real PM of the time was John Gorton of the Liberal Party.
* In ''EvanAlmighty'' the title character, a newly-elected Congressman, is shown driving his new Hummer and watching {{MSNBC}} within the first few minutes of the film...
* The president in ''BuckarooBanzai'' can't decide whether he's hawkish or diplomatic. The only pertinent executive decision is in how to resolve the alien crisis and prevent WorldWarIII, which would presumably be in any American party's interest. If only a MartyStu could solve everything and save the world in 30 minutes!
* In ''Film/IronMan2'' and ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheWinterSoldier'', the party of Senator Stern (PA) is never given. Good thing, too, since he is affiliated with [[spoiler:HYDRA]].
* The party of Jimmy Stewart's character, Senator Ransom Stoddard in ''Film/TheManWhoShotLibertyValance'' is never given.
* ''Film/AlwaysCrashingInTheSameCar'' never names the party, although it's obviously meant to be New Labour.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Literature]]
* In DanBrown's ''Literature/DeceptionPoint'', the almost saintly President Herney's party is never mentioned. However his opponent, Senator Sexton is [[StrawmanPolitical explicitly mentioned to be a Republican]].
* John Grisham doesn't usually identify the party affiliations of his politician characters. However, if you know anything about U.S. politics, it's not hard to figure it out.
* Greg Stillson, from StephenKing's ''Literature/TheDeadZone'', is running for the House (and, in the future, for president). It is explicitly stated that Stillson runs as an independent in his first campaign, defeating a well-known Republican congressman in a hard-red area of New Hampshire. Stillson later founds the America Now party, which runs on a conservative platform.
* In Meg Cabot's novel ''All-American Girl'', about a teenager who takes a bullet for the president, survives, and ends up falling for his son, the party of the president is never mentioned... though it's implied a few times, based on the president's stances, that he's a Republican.
* Very deliberately in SWiseBauer's THE REVOLT. The novel's president was elected after an independent campaign, and his advisers worry that anything discrediting him will permanently doom the non-party noble experiment.
* In the introduction to TheOvertonWindow, GlennBeck explicitly states that he did not want to pinpoint either party as the source of evil.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Live Action TV]]
* In ''Series/TwentyFour'', presidential candidate David Palmer is referred to as a Democrat in Season 1. His opponent in the general election (not the party primaries), John Keeler, is presumably a Republican, yet he is never explicitly referred to as such, is endorsed by the very left-leaning AFL-CIO, and had a campaign logo presciently similar to the later [[RealLife real-life]] Kerry-Edwards 2004 logo. Wayne Palmer, who becomes President in season 6, is presumably a Democrat like his brother, yet has [[StrawmanPolitical strawman conservatives]] as his Vice President and Chief of Staff.
** In Season 7, President Allison Taylor is not explicitly identified by party (at least so far). Since her predecessor is presumably Democrat, she is presumably Republican - and yet her idealism tends to be more of a liberal trait, and her predecessor appears to have mostly GOP traits.
*** It could be resolved if one assumes that Keeler is a Democrat and that his election against Palmer was a primary election. Consider that, from what we know of Palmer, he seems to be a very moderate, [[{{JohnFKennedy}} JFK]]-style Democrat, which nowadays could theoretically open him up to a primary challenge from the left wing of the Democratic Party. Early in Season One, as Palmer visits a school on the campaign trail, we very briefly see hints that a teacher--and the teacher's union--are disgruntled with Palmer's stance on education, with the exact dialogue implying that Palmer is for merit pay and other measures opposed by the teacher's union, thus making him at least somewhat conservative on that issue. Also consider that in the debate between Palmer and Keeler, we see Keeler railing against free trade agreements that Palmer has signed, thus putting Keeler to the left of Palmer on that issue. And of course, there's the fact that when it comes to homeland security and defense issues, Palmer is seen taking stances that Jack and many real life conservatives tend to agree with. All in all, it makes it possible that Keeler is a more left-wing Democrat challenging Palmer in the primary. This would make Logan, and possibly Taylor, Democrats as well.
**** There's another theory that Keeler and Logan are Republicans, but that ''Wayne'' Palmer is a Republican as well, unlike his Democratic brother. This would explain why his Cabinet is staffed by neoconservatives, and would thus make Taylor a Democrat. As for the plausibility of this, not all members of the same family necessarily are from the same party. And considering that David Palmer was implied to be a very moderate Democrat, his brother Wayne being a moderate Republican is certainly not impossible.
* Arguably lampshaded by the entire short-lived series "Mr. Sterling", in which Josh Brolin's character (a prison teacher) is assumed to be a Democrat when he is appointed to finish the term of a Democratic Senator, but declares himself an independent. (In real life a freshman independent, appointed to fill a term, would be a political cipher, but Sterling ends up getting appointed to key committees almost immediately, presumably because a show about a Senator with no power at all would be pretty boring.)
* Jim Hacker, in ''YesMinister'', had Conservative views as well as looking and acting very much like the stereotypical Conservative MP, but was not identified as such. His party HQ was called "Central House", an amalgam of Central Office and Transport House, the locations of the Conservative Party and the Labour Party in real life at that time. In fact, many of the plot points in ''Yes Minister'' are based on real incidents, but they occurred under both Conservative and Labour ministries.
** On one occasion, in fact, Hacker is heard musing on what the Conservative or Labour parties would do in a similar situation, implying he is neither.
** Hacker is also seen wearing a white rosette as the election results are read out at the start of the pilot episode Open Government, alongside others wearing blue (Conservative) and red (Labour) rosettes.
** This is actually part of the point of the show--that regardless of party and ideology, the elected leaders are hamstrung by the career bureaucrats (who, for their own part, may honestly believe that they serve the people best by preventing well-intentioned politicians from gumming up the works).
-->''"The Opposition aren't really the Opposition. They're just called the Opposition. But in fact they are the Opposition in exile. The Civil Service are the Opposition in residence."''
--->--Journalist Anthony Jay, paraphrased in an early episode of ''YesMinister''
* Governor Gatling of ''{{Benson}}'' only ever refers to his party as "The Party". For that matter, we're never even told [[WhereTheHellIsSpringfield what state he's the governor of.]]
* Harriet Jones from ''Series/DoctorWho'' repeatedly introduces herself as "MP for Flydale North" without ever mentioning what party she represents. Certain clues have led fans to believe she belongs to either the Labour (the reference to "the babes" in "Aliens of London") or Conservative (the Margaret Thatcher allegory in "The Christmas Invasion").
** Nicely averted with the third series with the Master, who was an "independent candidate" who attracted a coalition of [=MPs=] from all the parties. Didn't matter much in the end, though: he was using mind-control to get elected.
* Handled in ''JackAndBobby'' by stating that Bobby grew up to be America's first independent party president. After brief stints in both major parties, just so no one would get pissed off.
* Although ''Series/TheOuterLimits'' episode "The Hundred Days of the Dragon" revolves around a Presidential election, we never learn the party of either candidate. Also, only one of the candidates is important to the story, so the other one is TheGhost.
* The mayor in ''Series/SpinCity''. Some of his properties were those of a strawman Liberal, while others were that of a strawman Conservative.
* Throughout season one of ''Series/{{Heroes}}'', Nathan Petrelli is running for Congress. His party and political views are never discussed. The show also makes a much bigger deal out of a congressional election than is typical of real life.
** He's like Senator Kelly; his main opinions are to do with DifferentlyPoweredIndividual. Except, unlike Kelly, he's in a world with TheMasquerade in force, so he can't have official policies based on that...
** Subtle hints indicate that he is a Republican, particularly the fact that his campaign is based on "family values", which at the time was a phrase more vocally used by Republicans.
** Tracy Strauss, a political consultant and [[BlondeRepublicanSexKitten Blonde Maybe Republican Sex Kitten]] would also fit this trope. She says that her boss, the governor of New York, has trouble with the far right but that does not rule out him being a Republican. The fact that he bothers trying to appeal to the far right at all may indicate that he is a Republican. She is likely of the same party as Nathan Petrelli as she helped him become a Senator.
* The party the main characters of ''TheHollowmen'' belong to is referred to merely as "The Party". Its leader is "The Prime Minister" and [[InvisiblePresident is never shown on camera]].
* In ''Series/StargateSG1'', the political party that Robert Kinsey and Henry Hayes belong to is never specified, but can ''kinda'' be guessed to be Republican.
** It's ''very'' difficult to tell with ''Stargate'', as politicians sometimes seem to be on both sides of the political spectrum. This also applies to the nameless president of the first seven seasons.
** It's only very difficult to tell with Hayes and the nameless president, as we don't really see them do anything public policy wise. Kinsey is probably a Republican (and a pretty heavy Christian Fundamentalist at that) and as he was Hayes' VP for a while it would imply that Hayes is also a Republican.
*** In addition, a comment by Mitchell in the tenth season suggests that Kinsey, forced to resign during "Lost City", was replaced by Dick Cheney, a Republican and the real life VP when the episode first aired.
* Pretty much every politician in ''LawAndOrder'', regardless of which series. While there is the occasional snide comment about certain political groups (usually, but not always, aimed at conservative groups/issues), rarely is a specific political party mentioned. There are, however, plenty of obvious knock-offs of famous politicians and pundits, thus allowing the viewer to draw what conclusions they will.
** Although it has to be said that during Fred Thompson's run as the DA, he expressed plenty of conservative points that are not unlike his actual party (GOP). For example, he parroted Scalia's view that there is no ingrained constitutional right to privacy, a very GOP/originalist view. (for those who are not American, the actor is a former took the role while in his last year as a Republican Senator from Tennessee and left the show to run for President.) Jack [=McCoy=] is more or less ambiguous and would do anything to win his case (one time he succeeded to nullify all gay marriages to try to break spousal confidentiality of a suspect, mirroring the time when the mayor of a small town upstate was issuing licenses for same sex marriage). On the other hand, Jack [=McCoy=] has, at the end of the day, expressed liberal positions on most issues not relating directly to criminal justice (and even some that do).
** A season one episode had D.A. Adam Schiff and A.D.A. Ben Stone attending a Democratic fundraiser.
* On an episode of ''{{Frasier}}'', Marty and his sons appear in television ads for opposing congressional candidates. Though Frasier and Niles' man is a "bleeding-heart" who supports the NEA and protecting the environment, and Marty's is tough on crime and pro-military and family values, the words "Democrat" and "Republican" (or "liberal" or "conservative") are not mentioned. Of course, one or both could be an independent or third-party candidates.
** Notably, this contrasts KelseyGrammer's own political affiliation, and that of his most vocally (straw) political character, [[TheSimpsons Sideshow Bob]].
* ''Series/TheThickOfIt'' simply has "The Party" and "The Opposition", but it isn't hard to guess who their real-life equivalents are (Labour and the Tories, respectively).
* Vice President Selina Meyer's party on ''Series/{{Veep}}'' is never stated. However, in the grand tradition of Creator/ArmandoIannucci (who also did ''Series/TheThickOfIt''), it's pretty obvious that the Administration is something of an {{Expy}} of the one in power (i.e. that of UsefulNotes/BarackObama, i.e. the Democrats).
** Selina isn't an expy of Joe Biden, however, as having a good-natured, [[FeeFiFauxPas gaffe-prone]], unambitious elder statesman of a VP wouldn't make for good comedy, or at least not as good as an ambitious and embittered ex-Senator who had made a serious presidential run in the previous election. Hey, [[UsefulNotes/HillaryRodhamClinton wait a minute...]].
* Irish political sitcom ''Val Falvey T.D.'' never mentioned the lead's party. His logo is green, implying Fianna Fáil, but the opening titles are blue, implying Fine Gael.
* The panel show ''If I Ruled the World'' had a Blue Team consisting of Graeme Garden and a teammate versus a Red Team consisting of Jeremy Hardy and a teammate, all playing politicians, but not corresponding to the Conservative or Labour parties, and mostly sticking to satirizing the political process in general.
* ''Series/CommanderInChief'' had Geena Davis' Vice President run as an Independent with suggested libertarian leanings. When she ends up assuming the presidency after the current president dies, this is brought up as a subject of disquiet more than her gender is. She canonically started out as a moderate, New England-style Republican (flashbacks in the Pilot episode show the Connecticut Republican Party recruiting her to run for Congress and she became the arch-conservative President Bridges's running mate because he needed a moderate Republican to balance the ticket). After this, though, she officially became an Independent.
* The Politician's party that Carrie from ''SexAndTheCity'' dates for a brief period is kept intentionally vague -- because, hey, that's not what The Girls are about.
* In an episode of ''TheMonkees'', Mike runs for mayor in order to unseat the corrupt incumbent; neither the party of Mike nor the incumbent mayor is ever given (though Mike can possibly be assumed to be running as an Independent). This leads to a slightly awkward bit of dialogue early on where Mike threatens to take his complaint with the mayor and "dump it in the opposing party's lap".
* Sheriff Andy Taylor on ''TheAndyGriffithShow''. However, as an elected official in a [[SweetHomeAlabama Southern state]] [[TheSixties during the sixties]] it's most likely that he's a [[FoxNewsLiberal conservative Democrat]].
* both Boss Hogg and Sheriff Rosco on ''TheDukesOfHazzard''
* In ''Series/{{JAG}}'' the political affiliations of both [=SECNAVs=] are unknown. The political affiliation of [[StrawmanPolitical Congresswoman Bobbie Latham]] is never explicitly stated, but many of the issues she supports are definitely left-wing (and thus can't be a Republican by any stretch of the imagination).
* A major plot in an early season of ''Series/{{Smallville}}'' was a Senate race between Jonathan Kent and Lex Luthor. As with DC Comics, care was taken to avoid identifying either one as a Democrat or Republican, to the point where neither party is even mentioned by name. It was so vague that some have speculated that for all we know, they may have been running in the same party, or perhaps one was an independent.
* Series/JeevesAndWooster provides a very bizarre episode, where a friend of Bertie's has fallen in love with a girl who's a member of what is obviously a group of Communist activists (they preach against the bourgeousie, they dislike the class system, and they even had a hammer and sickle on their flag), but who are never referred to as Communists throughout the entire episode.
* President Elias Martinez in ''TheEvent''. His party affiliation is never specified. The only thing known is that his VP originally ran against him but was persuaded to switch sides by someone else.
* ParksAndRecreation doesn't divulge what parties the local politicians are in, even though Indiana law requires it. Leslie would surely be a Democrat based on the way she handles issues while her opponent for City Council Bobby Newport would be a Republican. Averted by Ron Swanson, who identifies himself as a Libertarian.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Theatre]]
* Played with in the musical comedy ''OfTheeISing'':
-->'''Throttlebottom:''' Excuse me, gentlemen, but what party are we?\\
'''Wintergreen:''' We've got plenty of time for that. The important thing is to get elected.\\
'''Jones:''' You see, we're Republicans in most states.\\
'''Lyons:''' But the South is Democratic.\\
'''Jones:''' Oh, sure. We're Democrats down there.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Video Games]]
* Solidus Snake in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid 2'' is the ex-President of the United States, but his party is never brought up. The two swords he uses, incidentally, are called Minshu ("democratic") and Kyowa ("republic"), just in case you thought you were getting any clues.
** The incumbent President Johnson's party isn't stated either.
* In ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV'', the parties of Mayor Julio Ochoa, Deputy Mayor Bryce Dawkins and Governor candidates John Hunter and Michael Graves are never given. Judging by their [[StrawmanPolitical political views]], you can make educated guesses.
* U.S. Senator Patrick Darcy in ''AlphaProtocol''. What little of him is revealed in the news, introducing a new bill, won't help, as it's a fictional counterpart to a RealLife bipartisan bill ([=McCain-Feingold=]). Averted with President of Taiwan Ronald Sung, who is given explicit party affiliation.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Webcomics]]
* When ''Webcomic/{{Shortpacked}}'''s Robin [=DeSanto=] gets elected to congress, this is lampshaded as a "Non-Partisan Romp!" Later, an unlabelled campaign leaflet blends caricatures of both sides with "Robin [=DeSanto=] is out of touch with core American values! Voted yes on CANCER! Voted yes on TERRORISTS!" Voted no on BABIES! Voted no on FREEDOM!
** Webcomic/DumbingOfAge Robin, on the other hand, is implied to be a conservative Republican in all but name, but with a twist -- she admits to ''very'' liberal Roz that it's a show for the rural rubes in her district. In fact, it's shown that she's basically a more cynical, sleazier version of her mainline counterpart; she's a closet bisexual (Walkyverse Robin is out, but didn't realize she was bi for a very long time) who doesn't actually seem to care about much of anything - she slept through her own Election Day.
* Dylan/USA Patriot Act and Jenny/American Eagle, two of the pupils at the ''PS238'' School for [[DifferentlyPoweredIndividual meta-prodigies]], are candidates from opposing parties to replace the aging Freedom Fighter (the PS238-verse's CaptainAmerica {{Expy}}). Their parties are, how ever, never named, and since they both sprout the same [[PatrioticFervor patriotic platitudes]] it is difficult to tell who is who.
** [[http://nodwick.humor.gamespy.com/ps238/comics/index.php?date=2007-10-03 How ever, Dylan's favorite color is red and Jenny's is blue]].
** The other time you can actually tell their politics apart is when they light directly into each other, when Dylan will call Jenny a pinko commie and she responds by calling him a backwards neanderthal (or something of the sort).
** [[TheWarOnTerror Dylan's code name]] might also be telling.
* In ''ArthurKingOfTimeAndSpace'' President Arthur Pendragon is definitely left-wing, and his predecessor President Lucius Roman was definitely right-wing. However, their parties are only referred to as "the liberal party" and "the conservative party".
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Western Animation]]
* When Lex Luthor runs for president during the second season of ''JusticeLeagueUnlimited'', he is specified as being "within striking distance" of ''both'' major parties, thereby not only not associating the villain with the Republicans or Democrats, but shutting out the possibility entirely, defusing any arguments about how Luthor would (''obviously'', of course) be running for [insert your least favorite of the two here].
** In the comics, he represented "The Tomorrow Party".
* [[PinkyAndTheBrain Pinky]] similarly took up stock with the "Pink Party" when he ran for President. The party's chief adviser had previously worked for Nixon, Kennedy, and Dukakis.
* Mayor Adam West on ''FamilyGuy''
** Also Lois Griffin's party was never given when when she ran for mayor of Quahog and defeated Mayor West.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Real Life]]
* In Canada, the Legislative Assemblies of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut are non-partisan and all candidates run independently of whatever party they might be a member of (if they hold membership at all).
* Similarly, Nebraska's unicameral legislature is non-partisan--although usually, everyone knows how the members lean.
* Many states in the US have elected or partially elected judiciaries--i.e. judges on at least some state courts have fixed terms and must seek election/reelection to win/keep office. In some states these elections are partisan, and in other states these elections are "retention" elections (i.e. "should we keep this judge who has been appointed" rather than "who should be judge"), but 10-20 states (depending on which kind of court we're talking about) have officially nonpartisan contested elections--but again, usually everyone knows which way the members lean and in some states (e.g. Michigan and Ohio), parties actively endorse the nonpartisan judicial candidates.
* The first President of the United States of America, GeorgeWashington, is the only president not to belong to any political party. It explains some of the prez[=/=]vice prez combinations that followed...
** The mismatched prez/vice prez combinations were caused by the fact that originally the vice president was whoever finished second in the presidential election (each member of the electoral college had two votes, so a vice president could be elected despite Washington being unanimous). Thus, a candidate from one party could win the presidential election, but the candidate from the opposing party could win the vice presidential election. This practice was stopped when it became obvious that having the President and VP opposing each other was a bad idea, and in that system, having an actual ticket was an [[AaronBurr even worse one]].
*** All this is because the Founding Fathers (including, perhaps especially, Washington) distrusted political parties and created a political system under the assumption there wouldn't be any... which didn't stop parties from forming before the ink was dry on the Constitution, led by men who themselves distrusted parties.
** Candidates for legislative offices, at least, occasionally do get elected without party backing, in which case their affiliation is listed as "Independent". Usually this happens when an established political figure who's a moderate Republican or Democrat has a falling-out with that party's more die-hard members, and splits away.
* Averted in Mexico: While legally anyone can be elected in any elective office position, in practice only members of a political party can be elected in any position. Many NGO's have asked for years to change the laws to similar ones used in the U.S., even though ''Washington was the only American president that was not a member of a political party.''
[[/folder]]

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Exceptions/Subversions ]]


[[folder:Film]]
* Averted in ''Film/TheAvengers''. The politician criticizing the Avengers for damaging Manhattan is a Democrat, though if you blink, you miss it.
* ''Film/TheCampaign'' makes incumbent Congressman Cam Brady a Democrat and challenger Marty Huggins a Republican, but this ends up not mattering much, since neither candidate actually campaigns on the issues. Instead they just spout empty platitudes and make personal attacks against each other, while CorruptCorporateExecutive[=s=] make all the real decisions.
* Bill [=McKay=] in ''Film/TheCandidate'' is expressly stated to be the Democratic son of a Democratic former governor.
* Every character in ''TheContender'' has his/her party and general political stances made very explicit.
* Most of the characters in the play and movie ''StateOfTheUnion'' are Republican politicians and make no bones about it. (Though one of the party hacks explains that the essential difference between the parties is: "They're in--and we're out!")
* ''Film/TheIdesOfMarch'' is set during the Democratic primaries for President.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Literature]]
* Literature/JackRyan, from the Tom Clancy novel series, is explicitly described as an independent, though he clearly holds policies that mark him as a very conservative AuthorAvatar.
** Ed Kealty comes close, but it's quite clear that he's nothing more than an amoral, conniving man who's politics only matter in which of Ryan's statements he twists to meet his needs. Durling, while obviously a liberal (as he is Fowler's VP. a character who is clearly in opposition to Ryan's conservatism) is clearly respected by Ryan and returns that respect. Fowler himself is shown as a good man, with very cogent arguments against Ryan's politics and views, his treatment of Ryan bordering on persecution is clearly shown as being caused, not by political differences, but because of misinformation and distortion of the man by Liz Elliot, who maintains a vendetta against him up until her complete breakdown after Denver got nuked. As for Ryan himself, he's very conservative, and something of a Gary Stu, but his views very much resemble real-world ones, if somewhat simplified for plot reasons.
* Rudy Rucker's novel ''Mathematicians In Love'' is a rare example of someone bothering to change the names of the parties -- "Heritagist" and "Common Ground" -- while still making it very, very obvious that he's talking about real-life politics. (The Heritagists are a party of closed-minded conservatives who are rampantly curtailing civil liberties and have just gotten done wrecking the country through a disastrous war in the Middle East. The Common Ground party is a party that's just gotten done running a [[UsefulNotes/JohnKerry completely uncharismatic war veteran]] against the Heritagists and utterly failing to unseat them, causing a wave of despair among liberals determined to abandon the country and move to Canada.)
* A pretty surprising aversion comes from the children's novel ''My Mother The Mayor, Maybe'', where the protagonist's mother is clearly stated to be a Democrat and the race is quite partisan, even though as a small town mayoral election it wouldn't be surprising at all for the election to be non-partisan. This is done primarily to play up the underdog element as the campaign is in a supposedly heavily Republican town, though it also takes a decidedly slanted stance on the issues discussed as well, not something to be expected in a book for the middle school set.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Live Action TV]]
* ''Series/TheWestWing'' where Bartlet is very clearly a Democrat.
** As was Andrew Shepherd [[SpiritualSuccessor before him]] in ''The American President''.
** Pretty much everyone in the West Wing is clearly of one party or the other (or at least could be classed as conservative or liberal). The sole exceptions seem to be people associated with the military or national security: when the West Wing staff are briefly considering replacing John Hoynes with Admiral Fitzwallace, either Ed or Larry asks if Fitzwallace is even a Democrat. Later in the series, Will is shocked to learn that Kate Harper, who had expressed occasional liberal values throughout her run, had voted for Vinick, the Republican candidate. Since both Fitzwallace and Kate got their jobs thanks to their experience in the Navy, their political views on nonmilitary issues are somewhat moot. Nancy McNally is similarly vague in her political persuasion.
* Sneakily averted in the LittleBritain sketches featuring Anthony Stewart Head as the Prime Minister. While his party affiliation is never ''explicitly'' revealed, there are enough clues given to make it blindingly clear that he's Labour - he wears a red tie while the Leader of the Opposition wears a blue one, and his Chancellor of the Exchequer is very obviously based on Gordon Brown (the Prime Minister himself is more loosely based on Tony Blair).
* Alan [[MeaningfulName B'stard]] in the ''The New Statesman'' just ''had'' to be a Conservative.
** To reflect TruthInTelevision of several Tory [=MPs=], in the revived 2006 stage show it is revealed he "crossed the floor", joining Labour in 1995.
* Likewise Francis Urquhart in HouseOfCards, though not in the original book.
** Frank Underwood is a Democrat in the [[Series/HouseOfCards US version]].
* Averted in Irish drama ''The Running Mate''. Corrupt politician Vincent Flynn is expelled from government party Fianna Fáil, and stands for election as an independent.
* Hybridised in TheAmazingMrsPritchard, where Ros Pritchard forms the Purple Democratic Alliance out of dissatisfaction with both Labour and the Conservatives after they start a fistfight outside her supermarket (purple = Labour red + Conservative blue, of course), pinching members from both parties in the process. TakeThat, Lib Dems! (She persuades a Lib Dem to defect, too.)
* All three Presidents in ''MyFellowAmericans'' are identified as either Democrat or Republican in the opening scenes.
* Despite being a legal and not a political drama, ''Series/RumpoleOfTheBailey'' manages to avert this: Guthrie Featherstone is a Labour (implied) MP who later (explicitly) joins the SDP, Rumpole's third client in the series is a Labour backbencher, Charles Hearthstoke self-identifies as a Tory, and Liz Probert...well...let's just say that her father's name is "Red" Ron Probert, shall we? Rumpole himself doesn't clearly have a party affiliation, but, iconoclast and sympathizer with the poor that he is, it would appear that he's somewhere on the left (likely voting Labour at the beginning of the series in 1967 and voting Liberal Democrat by the end in 1992).
* ''Series/TheGoodWife'' makes no secret of that the central characters are all Democrats. Then again, the show does take place in UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}}...
* ''Series/PoliticalAnimals'' averts this: the central non-journalist characters are all Democrats. This makes a certain amount of sense, as Elaine is a proud NoCelebritiesWereHarmed version of UsefulNotes/HillaryRodhamClinton, Bud Hammond is UsefulNotes/BillClinton with a bit of UsefulNotes/LyndonJohnson for flavor, the Hammonds collectively are [[UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy Camelot]], and President Garcetti is UsefulNotes/BarackObama [[RaceLift as an Italian]].
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Webcomics]]
* In ''Webcomic/{{Shortpacked}}'', Robin's political party is never stated outright, but since she's a bi woman who got into office on the combined toy geek/necrophiliac vote (and her rival is UsefulNotes/SarahPalin), she's probably a Democrat, but considering the gag-like nature of the whole thing, it's best not to read too much into it. On the other hand, in the slightly more serious ''Webcomic/DumbingOfAge'', her party isn't named, but the fact that she's campaigning on a "family values" platform, the strongly feminist lesbian Leslie Bean voted against her, and her EthicalSlut sister hates everything she stands for, she's almost certainly Republican. WordOfGod states that in the former comic, she didn't have a party (or maybe he just meant it was irrelevant), while in the latter she does.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Western Animation]]
* President Richard Nixon's Head in ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' is not one bit less Republican than the real Richard Nixon.
* Mayor Quimby from ''TheSimpsons'' is a member of the Democratic Party. He is also a parody of JohnFKennedy.
** The straw-evil Republican Party, on the other hand, counts Montgomery Burns (obviously), Sideshow Bob (for comic effect) and surprisingly Doctor Hibbert.
[[/folder]]
----