A wise Asian mentor to a usually white character.

The Magical Asian, like the MagicalNegro or MagicalNativeAmerican, exists to dispense lessons to white characters using the wisdom of his people. He will usually be a [[AllAsiansKnowMartialArts martial arts master]], a practitioner of traditional Asian medicine, or a sage of some Eastern religion. If he is not explicitly supernatural, he will often (but not always) be so highly skilled in his art that it will [[CharlesAtlasSuperpower appear superhuman]]. Martial artists will be impossibly good fighters, the medicine-men will be able to easily diagnose and cure any illness (bonus points if he mentions chi), and the sage will be enlightened with some kind of supernatural intuition. Expect at least one scene of them meditating. They will often quote {{Ice Cream Koan}}s attributed to Buddha, Confucius, or some other famous Asian sage.

Unlike the MagicalNegro, the Magical Asian is not always nice to his white protégé. It is common for the Magical Asian to put his student through a number of demeaning and seemingly pointless tasks. However, it always turns out that there is a purpose to these tasks that helps get his lesson across. [[TheKarateKid Mr. Miyagi's]] famous "WaxOnWaxOff" routine is one of the best known examples. This tendency is possibly related to AsianRudeness.

He will speak in proverbs and {{Koan}}s. He will often be referred to as sensei, sifu, or master. Your training will be complete WhenYouSnatchThePebble from his hand.

Often overlaps with OldMaster.

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!!Examples:

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[[folder: Live Action TV ]]

* Master Po and Master Kan in ''KungFu''. Their protege Caine is half Chinese and half White.
** Also from ''KungFu'', Caine himself to the people he meets when he's WalkingTheEarth of TheWildWest.
** In ''KungFu: The Legend Continues'' the IdenticalGrandson of Kwai Chang Caine, also called Kwai Chang Caine, took this role towards his [[LongLostRelative long lost son]] Peter and others, and The Ancient One was this to Kwai Chang.
* BruceLee's character on ''Longstreet''.
* An acupuncturists' teacher in ''{{Series/The Invisible Man}}''. He is able to intuit that the acupuncture needles he is using were stolen by his apprentice from a museum when they are ineffective.
* Lampshaded in an episode of ''ZekeAndLuther'', then played straight with the Asian mailman who appears in that episode and tries teaching one of the boys some sort of kung-fu technique.
* The Dragon, a Chinese magical healer from ''Series/OnceUponATime''. Though he's implied to be an actual dragon, he mostly appears as an Asian human.

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[[folder: Film ]]

* Mr. Miyagi from ''TheKarateKid'', though he's more well-developed than most other characters on this list.
** Mr. Han, played by JackieChan, in the 2010 remake.
* JackieChan and JetLi's characters in ''Film/TheForbiddenKingdom''.
* Pai-Mei from ''KillBill''. His treatment of students is less WaxOnWaxOff and more TrainingFromHell.
* Mr. Lee, played by {{Mako}}, in the ''Karate Kid'' ripoff ''Film/{{Sidekicks}}''. His own version of WaxOnWaxOff is throwing raw dumpling dough at his student and giving him a demeaning nickname. He is also somehow able to teleport a lit cigarette into the pocket of a racist who insulted him.
* The Indian characters in ''Film/EatPrayLove'', who teach spiritual lessons to Julia Roberts' character.
* The nameless monk in ''Film/BulletProofMonk''.
* Pretty much every Chinese character in ''Film/BigTroubleInLittleChina''. For some reason, a restaurant owner, a maitre'd, and a Chinatown tour guide are all experts in Chinese [[AllAsiansKnowMartialArts martial arts]] and sorcery.

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[[folder: Literature ]]

* ''TheDestroyer'' series. Chiun is a Korean who is the Master of Sinanju, which is the sun source (original) martial art and the basis for all other martial arts. He teaches his knowledge to the protagonist, Remo Williams. The reason stated in the series for not simply employing Chiun to do the killing (instead of training Remo to do the killing) is to avoid invoking the related "Phantom Oriental" trope in passers-by.
* Parodied in the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' series by Lu-Tze, the sweeper at the Temple of Oi-Dong, who is also a master of the martial art Deja-Fu (in which the hands move through both time and space):
-->'''Rule One:''' "Do not act incautiously when confronting little bald wrinkly smiling men".
** Also played straight, in that as a result of the NarrativeCausality of the Disc, Lu-Tze ''does'' have power over the course of history.

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[[folder: Web Original ]]

* Website/{{Cracked}} discusses this trope [[http://www.cracked.com/article_15989_hollywoods-6-favorite-offensive-stereotypes.html here]], which it calls "The Wise, Old, Asian Asshole".

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[[folder: Western Animation ]]

* In ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'', younger characters tend to have American accents while older, wiser mentor figures tend to have Asian accents regardless of what nation they are from. Iroh is the most prominent example. He was originally also played by {{Mako}}.
* Uncle from ''JackieChanAdventures'', voiced by Sab Shimono. A highly-skilled practitioner of ''qi'' magic, he could send spells through the phone, but didn't know how a fax machine worked.

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[[folder: Other ]]

* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Hydrick James Hydrick]] claimed to have learned telekinesis from a Chinese master.
* {{Invoked}} by [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ching_Ling_Foo Ching Ling Foo]], a Chinese magician popular in the USA during the late 1800s and early 1900s, as well as [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chung_Ling_Soo William Ellsworth Robinson]], a Caucasian magician who [[{{Yellowface}} pretended to be Asian]].

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