->''"And really, what did you expect them to do? Kill off Skippy? Or take time out from earlier episodes to throw in some random friend named Greg, just to give his death some meaning? Come on, it was the 80s. That time was much better spent on original songs by Tina Yothers."''
-->-- '''''Website/TheAgonyBooth''''', on the '''''Series/FamilyTies''''' episode "A, My Name is Alex"

The favorite relative/best friend character who appears in only a few episodes or just one VerySpecialEpisode, was never mentioned before, and is [[OneShotCharacter never heard from again]]. They usually provide AnAesop, like "drunk driving is bad" or [[TooSmartForStrangers "beware of strange adults."]]

The purpose of these characters seems to be delivering the moral without having to inflict the issue on a regular basis, or, in the case of a fatal Aesop, kill off anyone important. You get the 22 minutes of angst, but [[StatusQuoIsGod the writers never have to deal with it again.]] Long Lost Uncle Aesops don't sit well with shows that have loyal and obsessive fandoms, and are incompatible with the EconomyCast.

Please keep in mind that this trope isn't just the sudden appearance and disappearance of characters who would logically be significant, but when they appear, drop their Aesop, then go back into the aether. See also CompressedVice (when the issue is inflicted on a regular for one episode), RememberTheNewGuy, ForgottenFallenFriend, NewNeighboursAsThePlotDemands. {{Gay Aesop}}s tend to be this as well.
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!!Examples:

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:Anime and Manga]]
* ''SailorMoon'' did this a lot, since the characters often doubled as a VictimOfTheWeek. Was especially jarring as it was occasionally suggested the leads have trouble making friends and seemed to have no real social life outside their small group, despite meeting and getting along with people fairly quickly each episode.
** Urawa (Greg in the dub) shows up as a VictimOfTheWeek who learns not to be fatalistic or cheat on tests just because he can see the future with perfect accuracy; he's one of the rare few to get a second appearance, but after that he drops off the face of the earth. Made ''especially'' weird because the senshi are later shown to keep in touch with villains they've healed, and Urawa is lucky enough to keep his magical powers even after his crystal's been removed. Who knows how many problems they might have averted if they kept a ''precognitive'' on the B-squad?
* A rather extreme example: The ''DragonBall'' Jump Anime Tour Special (later broadcast online) introduced Vegeta's outcast brother Tarble, who came to Earth looking for his brother's help. The special aired in 2008, '''twelve years''' after the original anime ended.
* Kim in ''[[FistOfTheNorthStar Fist of the North Star]]'', who was Ryuken's fifth student before being expelled from his dojo, is only shown in a flashback to emphasize Kenshiro's compassion to others, and is never mentioned anywhere else in the series.
* ''Manga/HimitsuNoAkkoChan'', the original 1969 series, introduces into the small crew of friends of the schoolgirl Akko-chan a deaf-mute kid. He'll never be seen after episode 32, and his only role is apparently stir Akko-chan's compassion enough to [[BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor wish on herself]] [[CompressedVice deaf-muteness]] to better understand him, only to start breaking apart when, unable to reverse her own wish, she finds herself unable to handle the condition her new friend was bearing. Upon imparting the main character the much needed Aesop, the kid abruptly vanishes, and he's never seen or talked about. Ever.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Comic Books]]
* Aside from her trademarked obsession with polka-dots, this was ''[[LittleDot Little Dot's]]'' main gimmick: a never-ending assortment of uncles and aunts, most of whom had their ''own'' all-consuming passion e.g. Uncle Smoke and [[MeaningfulName smoking]].
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Literature]]
* A staple of the YA girls' series popular in the 1990s -- not surprising, considering these books were sitcom episodes in print form. A typical example from the ''BabySittersClub'' series: Amelia, suddenly introduced as a close friend of Mary Anne, who had never been mentioned before and was killed by a drunk driver about ten pages in to teach the moral of the story.
** The BSC used this a lot. A new baby-sitting client would be introduced at the beginning of the book, needing the services of the club, and naturally after a few sitting jobs the girls would realize something was up. The most pointed examples are ''Keep Out, Claudia!'', dealing with a mother whose super-Aryanism would be comical if it wasn't so disconcerting, and ''Claudia and the Terrible Truth'', where the girls learn that two boys are being physically abused by their father. The latter is [[NightmareFuel one of the creepiest books in the entire series.]]
* Surprisingly averted with the character of Regina in ''SweetValleyHigh''. She dies as the result of a drug overdose, but up until then she had been a reoccurring character for several books. Also averted as she continued to be mentioned by the main characters in several books following her death.
* TheApprenticeshipOfDuddyKrawitz, so much.

[[/folder]]

[[folder:Live Action TV]]
* ''FamilyTies''
** Alex P. Keaton's alcoholic Uncle Ned (played by Creator/TomHanks) actually makes three appearances, but two of those are a Very Special two-part episode. [[Administrivia/RenamedTropes Originally]] the TropeNamer.
** ''FamilyTies'' also addressed TeenPregnancy, not by inflicting it on Mallory, but by bringing in Mallory's friend we've never seen before.
** Likewise, in another famed two-parter, Alex spends 40 minutes grieving over the sudden death of his close special friend... Whatshisname. Seriously, we'd never heard of him before, or ever would again. To a lesser extent, Season 3 featured brief appearances by "James" with the writers going to great lengths to try and convince the audience that he has been Alex's best friend/rival since childhood.
** Mallory would have a few of these episodes as well. A "beloved" aunt who was like a best friend to Mallory ends up dying. Another episode had Mallory dealing with the mother of a friend who committed suicide. Neither the aunt or friend were mentioned before or after their respective episodes. There was also an episode in which she was unsure of what to do when a character her parents' age whom she knew as "Uncle Arthur" (thankfully not an actual uncle) kissed her. He never showed up again either, although given what he did, it's not hard to imagine that the family cut off all contact with him.
* Matthew Perry's appearances as "Sandy" on ''GrowingPains''.
* ''TwoAndAHalfMen'' has an episode about Charlie's best friend (played by Charlie Sheen's real life brother) dying from having a similar lifestyle to his. What's interesting is that such best friend had never been mentioned before and would never been mentioned since. In fact, Alan didn't even know him in spite of having lived at Charlie's house for quite some time by then.
* On ''Series/{{MASH}}'''s first-season episode "Sometimes You Hear the Bullet", Hawkeye's happy-go-lucky best friend Tommy arrives just in time to get hit with the aforementioned noisy -- and fatal -- missile.
** In another episode, Margaret's "best friend" from the army shows up in order to have a drinking problem so the writers can make AnAesop about alcoholism. Despite the fact that the entire main cast drinks heavily and Hawkeye is probably an alcoholic as well.
** Col. Potter has had more than one "old army buddy" show up, prove themselves incapable of leading their men, and thereby putting Col. Potter in an awkward situation where he is torn between friendship and his responsibility as an army officer.
** There is a slight subversion in the episode "Who Knew?" A nurse we never heard of before, whom we never saw on screen, is killed in order to give Hawkeye some character development and make a point about the way he treats women. Justified in that the entire point was that the whole point was that he never really got to know her, because he keeps himself emotionally distant from everybody.
* In the episode "Lie To Me" from season two of ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', there is Ford, Buffy's "best friend" from her old high school in L.A. Ford is dying of a brain tumor, and bargains with Spike to be turned into a vampire in exchange for Buffy. Justified in that Buffy had moved a year ago, presumably leaving some her friends behind, and she'd spent the summer break back there, offscreen.
** Another Buffy example is in "Killed By Death," when Buffy exhibits a phobic reaction to being in the hospital, and we learn that it's because of her cousin Celia's death when they were kids. They were close, and Buffy was traumatized as a result of watching her die. While some of this trauma is legitimately resolved in the episode, the lack of mention of Celia before or after makes the whole thing seem to come out of nowhere. It is particularly jarring because Buffy spends a great deal of time visiting the hospital in Season Five, and shows no phobia beyond an appropriate reaction to the immediate circumstances. Nor does the First Evil ever manifest in Celia's form, which would seem an obvious way to get under Buffy's skin if the writers still remembered the character. Granted, the actress playing Celia - a long-deceased ''child'' character - could not concievably return, since the First Evil was only prominent ''five years later''. It might've worked in the Season 3 episode "Amends", but then the First was focusing more on Angel than Buffy.
** Buffy subverts this in the episode "The Puppet Show," however. When Emily (the dancer) is killed, Cordelia claims that she has lost "like, my best friend" - although Emily had never been mentioned on the show before. A subversion because Cordelia refers to Emily incorrectly as "Emma" during this speech and Xander calls her on never really having known the girl.
* ''Series/{{Scrubs}}'' takes place in a hospital, with a constant flow of patients, a setting almost tailor-made for introducing guest stars and Aesops. For some lessons, the emotional impact or context appropriateness of a random patient may not work for the Aesop so they'll say RememberTheNewGuy and bring in a unmentioned family member or a hospital colleague who somehow never made it on camera.
** An interesting case is the patient trapped in an MRI machine with her face obscured. Cue the {{Aesop}} about taking chances for about the third time. Then they start dating and she appears in a later episode and they bring her into another plot and another Aesop by having her work as a social worker (or similar) who deals with patients. The two episodes could have easily been written for two different characters. And then she had a pill addiction, making it a threefer.
** Ryan Reynolds played J.D. and Turk's never heard of before college roommate. Justified in that this was only halfway through the second season, but he's never heard of again despite the fact that the rest of the series has dozens of flashbacks to their college days, and despite his character being notable for accidently telling Doctor Cox that Jordan's baby was his, which was a fairly significant plot point. Likewise, Doctor Cox in season 4 is given an old black best friend who Cox discovers has an autistic son, and promises to help out, but he is not seen again either (notably, Cox also passes him on to ''another'' old friend of his, who we don't see at all, who specialises in helping autistic kids).
** It happens with their families too. Carla's brother has the distinction of lasting most of a season, but afterwards is never heard from again, not even to meet his baby niece; her sisters only make cameo appearances in a couple of episodes. Turk's brother gets one episode, and phones Turk in another confirming that he can make Turk's wedding (though as far as the audience can see, he doesn't). Their families do get mentions, but they seem to miss nearly every important occasion. Averted with J.D.'s brother Dan, who is a semi-reccuring character, and Elliot's parents who are mentioned frequently and appear on occasion. Justified with J.D.'s father who was respecfully killed off thanks to ActorExistenceFailure, and Doctor Cox's sister who he simply doesn't like to talk about as she reminds him of their painful, abusive childhood. Also justified with Jordan's sister Dani, who was a recurring supporting character but vanished from the last seasons- this was mostly in-character.
** The Janitor likes to plays with this trope. In one episode he puts on a fake moustache and denim jacket and tries to convince everyone that he is his own twin brother (nobody buys it); in another he pretends a nearby child is his son to make J.D. feel bad about insulting him. In a third he mentions his father died, causing J.D. to call him out by point out that he had met his father in a previous episode; the Janitor merely responds that "you met a man".
* All ''Franchise/StarTrek'' series have featured entire Aesop species who were brought in to visit their one problem and have the [[MightyWhitey humans]] fix it or at least tell them what their problem was. One of the most overt examples was an early TNG with a race of drug addicts supplied by a race of providers. It falls short as an allegory of modern drug addiction as the addicted species were led to believe the drug was a treatment for a disease (Which it technically was, but the providers neglected to tell the addicts that the disease had long since been wiped out and the only thing the drug was still treating was withdrawal symptoms, making the situation an addiction to prescription medicine prescribed by an unethical doctor who deliberately didn't warn his client about the risk of addiction).
* ''{{That 70s Show}}'' episode "Eric's Buddy" featured a new gay character. Even though he and Eric became good friends during the episode, he was never seen or referenced again.
* ''MightyMorphinPowerRangers'' did this sort of thing a lot. One episode featured Kimberly's friend who's deaf (revealing that the Pink Ranger knows Sign Language in the process), appearing just in time to be immune to a music-related MonsterOfTheWeek's powers, while dropping an Aesop on being nice to people with disabilities. One could argue that the girl could be a friend from school, but she still came out of the blue.
* ''FullHouse'' had Uncle Jesse's Greek Grandpa Papouli show up, have fun with everybody, then die about midway through the episode. They mourned, the VerySpecialEpisode taught us how to cope with old people dying, and Papouli was never mentioned again.
** To be fair, this was his second appearance on the show. The Greek relatives visited in an early season episodes.
** Also, the episode about Stephanie's classmate that gets beaten. Jesse makes some calls, the kid's removed from his home, and he's never mentioned again.
* in ''Series/RobinHood'', we learn (for the first time) in the fourth-to-last episode of the ''entire show'' that Robin's never-before-mentioned father and Guy's never-before-mentioned parents were all killed together in a fire. Except that Robin's father Malcolm ''didn't'' die, and he's actually been wandering Sherwood all this time without ever bothering to help or get in contact with his own sons or the two orphaned children of the women he loved. He reappears to tell Robin and Guy that they need to work together in order to rescue their half-brother Archer.
* ''TheGeorgeLopezShow'' did this often with guest stars, especially with Carmen's friends and boyfriends, examples including Carmen's boyfriend of one episode with an {{Aesop}} about being pressured into sex and Carmen's best friend of one episode telling her about the trend of wearing different colored bracelets to symbolize different places you had sex.
* Lucy's friend Sarah in the ''SeventhHeaven'' episode "Nothing Endures but Change" had never been seen or even mentioned before the episode. (However, she did get a mention three seasons later, by Lucy herself while she acted as grief counselor to her friend Mike and his shell-shocked mother.)
* In the ''{{Glee}}'' episode "Laryngitus", when Rachel loses her voice, Finn takes her to meet a quadriplegic friend of his who became paralyzed after an accident playing football. His Aesop was that he lost his ability to do what he loves most, but is working around that in order to live a fulfilling life. What makes this example particularly bad is that ''Glee'' is known for keeping track of its recurring characters, no matter how minor.
* Nathan Kress played one of these -- a wheelchair bound accident victim -- on ''TheSuiteLifeOfZackAndCody''.
* ''TheSecretLifeOfTheAmericanTeenager'' had Ricky's never-mentioned former foster brother Ethan show up so the show could have a very special episode about sexting.
* In one VerySpecialEpisode of ''BoyMeetsWorld'', Shawn and Cory help protect a classmate who is being physically abused by her dad, and at the end of the episode she is sent to live with her aunt in another state. This girl was never seen before this episode and is never mentioned again.
* A first season episode of ''Series/DawsonsCreek'' featured a character named Mary-Beth who was supposedly a friend of Dawson's with a crush on him.
* In one episode of ''SavedByTheBell'', Zack learned a valuable lesson about his Native American heritage (which is never discussed on any other episodes) from a man named Chief Henry, who promptly died at the end of act 2, allowing Zack to learn yet another valuable lesson about losing loved ones.
* The She's Positive episode of ''TheParkers'' had T meet the girl of his dreams, but finds out that she is HIV positive. At the end, they decide to continue their relationship but to take it one day at a time. The girl is never seen or mentioned again.
* In the ''Series/CriminalMinds'' episode "The Fallen", we meet David Rossi's old Vietnam sergeant who had a profound effect on Rossi's life (despite the fact Rossi never mentioned him before this episode, and he'd been on the team at this point for five years), and whose sole existence in the episode is to provide the underlying message of "[[StrawCivilian support our troops at all costs]]". It's justified in the fact that the sergeant fell off the grid after becoming homeless.
* ''Series/WizardsOfWaverlyPlace'': Who? When? How? Not telling!
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Western Animation]]
* Apart from Static and Gear, most of the good Bang Babies on ''StaticShock'' simply stuck around long enough for us to learn their Special Problem, then disappeared into the ether.
** The show also had a rather {{anvilicious}} episode about school shootings, where Virgil and Richie befriend a boy who's badly bullied by a popular JerkJock. However, we have never seen these two before this episode and never see them again afterward, despite the latter's alleged popularity and the lengths Virgil and Richie go to befriend the former. Considering that the series is about an accident that results in gang bangers (and a few bystanders) getting superpowers, this was to be expected.
* ''FamilyGuy''
** In "Peter, Peter, Caviar Eater," Lois's Aunt Margaritte comes to visit right at the beginning of the episode, but drops dead even before completing her first line, right there at the front door. On the commentary track, Seth [=MacFarlane=] explains that this scene was a direct parody of characters like this.
** Aunt Margaritte does show up in the time-travel episode, too, though.
** ''FamilyGuy'' has also played this trope straight on a few occasions. Lois' brother appeared in one episode as a maniac (also doubling as a MonsterOfTheWeek) before never being seen again. Lois' sister showed up in one episode to have a baby before never being seen again, though she at least gets occasional references in dialogue.
** She appeared as a main character in a recent episode... where an aesop was delivered and she disappeared again.
** Lois' brother also reappeared in a SilenceOfTheLambs parody where he was brought out of jail to help hunt a killer who was murdering kids at a Fat Camp.
* The TonightSomeoneDies episode of ''CloneHigh'' introduced - and killed - Ponce de Leon (portrayed as The Fonz and voiced by Luke Perry) as JFK's inseparable best friend, despite the fact that JFK was a main character who had already appeared extensively. Considering this is ''CloneHigh'', however, this was the joke to begin with.
* ''{{Jem}}'' did this a few times for [[VerySpecialEpisode Very Special Episodes]]. For example, Laura Holloway, who only existed in the episode "Alone Again" to get addicted to drugs and teach AnAesop.
* Cousin ''{{Joss|Whedon}}'' in KimPossible. The BrokenAesop learned is that Kim isn't really a hero because she can beat super villains in her sleep, but Ron is the real hero because he's a ThisLoserIsYou who sucks and would follow Kim anywhere despite his fear.
* Lampshaded in the ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' episode "Red Man's Greed." An unfamiliar boy named Alex Glick appears in the crowd throughout the episode expressing his concern for the fate of the town. After he delivers the {{Aesop}} at the end Stan finally asks who he is, and it's revealed that he's some guy who got to do a guest voice.
* In a ''{{Captain Planet and the Planeteers}}'' episode, Linka visits her cousin who gets her hooked on drugs, and turns into an addicted zombie. Said cousin dies of an overdose by the end of the episode, driving home the anti-drug Aesop.
** On the villains' side, we have Robin Plunder and Hoggish Greedly, Jr, who each appear for one episode.
** There's also Bambi Blight in the episode where the Planeteers learned not to judge a person based on their family.
** One episode features Wheeler's old friend, Trish, for a lesson about the wrongness of gang activity.
* C.L.I.D.E., a [[RobotRollCall robot character]] introduced in the ''WesternAnimation/TinyToonAdventures'' episode "Elephant Issues" (specificially, the [[ThreeShorts short]] "C.L.I.D.E. and Prejudice") whose main purpose is to make the episode address racism (the antagonist, by the way, is Montana Max).
* Fievel's Aunt Sophie from Russia in ''WesternAnimation/AnAmericanTail's'' AnimatedSeries ''Fievel's American Tails'' appears for only one episode, her Aesop is mainly just convincing Papa not to be so strict on his son.
* Cruella's mother Malevola appeared in one episode of ''Disney/OneHundredAndOneDalmatians'' and announced during a family reunion she'd leave her fortune to the De Vil who gets Dearly Farm for her. Cruella won but, once she hear her mother announcing her intention to move there, undid it all because, no matter how much she loves money, it's not to the point of enduring her for it. Once Cruella got bold enough to tell it to her mother, Malevola got proud of her for finally proving to be a De Vil and made Cruella her heiress anyway.
[[/folder]]
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