Most of a given country's creative output is produced for the consumption of people living in that country. This is especially true when there's a language barrier involved; translation is [[BlindIdiotTranslation hard work]]. For comedy, doubly so. Even if two countries share a language, there are [[SeparatedByACommonLanguage other complications involved with importing a creative work]]. For movies and TV shows, RegionCoding may necessitate a new DVD release. For VideoGames, two countries may have different versions of the same console. MoralGuardians and viewers in your country [[ValuesDissonance may get upset]] about aspects of the work that are taken for granted or even welcomed in the country of origin. Some parts may need changing [[CulturalTranslation just to make sense]]. There's always the risk that the viewing public [[ViewersAreMorons still won't get it]]. And this isn't even getting into dealing with [[ScrewedByTheLawyers international copyright law]], finding a distributor, and innumerable other headaches with moving a work from one country to another.

Production companies aren't going to want to deal with all this for things that aren't likely to sell well. This is the essence of the ImportFilter -- imported works come with even more pre-screening than domestic works that see general release. In some sense, this is "skimming the cream" -- picking out the 10% of everything that SturgeonsLaw tells us is ''not'' crud. It's more complicated than that, though. Some types of work may be aimed at a particular {{subculture}} in the importing country, and therefore the ones that end up getting imported will be the ones fit that subculture's expectations. It's not uncommon that the bulk of this work will come from a specified [[ShowGenres genre]]. Whether this is good or bad depends on whether you belong to that subculture, or at least whether you like the same things.

This can lead some people to declare that foreign media are better, because while they're exposed to the full spectrum of things from their own country, they only encounter imports that are both among the best works in a genre, and pre-selected to fit their tastes besides. Others who lack similar tastes may decide not to bother, or they may be turned off on imported works [[HypeAversion simply because fans like them so much]].

Compare NostalgiaFilter, a similar effect applied across temporal rather than physical/cultural distance. Can easily lead to a case of GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff.

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!!Examples of the ImportFilter at work:
->'''Note: most of these are written from a US-centric point of view... examples from other countries appreciated!'''

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder: Anime and Manga ]]

* In the United States, only a small portion of {{anime}} and {{manga}} will ever see wide release, much of which will target the {{shonen}} demographic. {{Fan sub}}s don't count -- only the [[{{Otaku}} hardcore fans]] are likely to seek them out. This also makes people think that anime is actually a ''genre'', when it is merely a term for animation produced in Japan; as most fans and this wiki can tell you (although it is also sometimes used to refer to the visual style, e.g. ''WesternAnimation/TheBoondocks'').
** {{Fan sub}}bing is a sort of unofficial filter for anime because of this; there are many series that are thought to have been official imported because the popularity they gathered through fan subbing.
** Applies even to {{Fan sub}}s. Not everything will get a fan sub, and it's more likely that the crap nobody watched ''because'' it was crap will fail to generate the interest a decent anime might.
*** See: ItsPopularNowItSucks. It overlaps with this trope a lot; if you ask any person what the worst anime is, they're likely to name something that was popular inside and outside of Japan (Especially if it was dubbed.) If you ask a hardcore {{Otaku}} or someone who lives in Japan what the worst anime is, they'll likely name something you've never even heard of as the worst anime ever. The reason you've never heard of it was because it was so bad, ''nobody wanted to sub it''. Even stuff considered "Crap" has dedicated fans who wish to share it with the world by translating and subtitling it.
** The breakdown of this trope is at least part of the reason why the JapaneseInvasion began to grind to a halt in UsefulNotes/TheNewTens. The internet fandom communities that popped up in the prior two decades were now big enough to bring many more Japanese series to the US... and they began to realize just ''why'' certain shows weren't imported. People not only began to realize that Japanese animation ''wasn't'' inherently superior to American animation, they also began to see that anime had its own assorted tropes and cliches, which were made more apparent once the novelty wore off and they could witness a broader, more representative cross-section of it.
* In Finland, while many manga series are translated, anime is EXTREMELY filtered, resulting in only extremely popular series being released. And quite late, too; for example, ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'' was only broadcast ''looong'' after the manga was translated.
** Spain suffers from the same, plenty of manga but few anime (And even less so on TV).
** The BENELUX also suffers from this trope. Due to the fact that anime begins to get distributed in the Netherlands whilst manga is directly imported from France. The Dutch are in general a very anti-violence community and will abolish any plan to release a violent anime (read: any non-cartooony violent or even with hypersexualised characters) , leading to very filtered releases (only 39 anime were ever released in the BENELUX). In France, anime and manga are very popular and due to there being no Dutch distributor of manga, French people decided to directly import them to the BENELUX market.
[[/folder]]

[[folder: Comic Books ]]

* There is only so much circulation between the major comic markets (European, US and Japan) because of this.
** This also gives the impression that the European comic book world is a lot smaller than it actually is, as very little of it gets across the Atlantic (to the US at least--the Canadians get a bit more), and what the US does get is super arty stuff, not the broad satire/humor, children's comics, and genre stuff that makes up most of the French/Belgian comics industry. About the only exceptions are Asterix and Tintin, both of which are significantly less well known in the US than in France.

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Film ]]

* Canadian film is a curious example. While the Quebecois enjoy their domestic, French-language movies, most English Canadian films rarely get much acclaim or even interest at home. It's more usual for them to go on to international film festivals and gain accolades there. It's something of a vicious cycle: since Canadian movies have a reputation for being arty and weird, the talent interested in big-budget Hollywood type stuff heads to the States, leaving Canada only with the people interested in producing... arty, weird movies.
* Another good example is European film. American film critics and film guide writers will only have encountered and reviewed the cream of the crop, which gives the impression that European movies are consistently better than American films. (Although European movies do tend to be more brooding and introspective...)
** A microcosm for this phenomenon is Creator/LucBesson. American critics view him as "the thinking man's action director" thanks to films like ''Film/TheProfessional'', ''[[Film/{{Nikita}} La Femme Nikita]]'' and ''Film/TheFifthElement''; even his less critically-acclaimed fare, like the ''Film/{{Taken}}'' films (which he produced and co-wrote), tend to be looked upon favorably compared to their American counterparts. European critics, on the other hand, dismiss him as a Hollywood sellout and "the French Creator/MichaelBay", maker of LowestCommonDenominator action movies like the ''Film/{{Taxi}}'' series that never see release in America.

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Live Action TV ]]

* This also applies to Canadian television. While shows like ''Series/CornerGas'', ''NorthOf60'', ''TheRedGreenShow'', ''TrailerParkBoys'', ''Series/{{Beachcombers}}'' and ''TheRaccoons'' all attain fanbases ranging from cult followings to genuine (if modest) popularity in English Canada, they occasionally hit it really big in the United States, with ''Series/DegrassiTheNextGeneration'' being a major example. Incidentally, ''Red Green'' has become a major source for Creator/{{PBS}} [[{{Telethon}} pledge drives]] in the U.S., with the actual cast of the show appearing to drum up support. Meanwhile, as with film, French Canadians actively consume their own domestic work, most notably in Quebec.
* British TV is often well-regarded, but only a few shows are widely viewed in the US -- ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'' and ''Series/DoctorWho'' are prominent examples.
** The Finnish national broadcasting company YLE more or less assumes that "British + comedy = the next Monty Python," and thus buy them left and right. British shows in general also seem to be [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff highly popular in Finland]], for some odd reason. Also the Spanish SitCom ''Los Serrano''.
*** YLE has recently starting importing popular {{HBO}} dramas like ''TheWire'' and ''{{Girls}}'', which are commercial-free (and cheap) and thus uniquely suitable.
** Also true for Germany. Most German series are regarded as ripoffs of American series and get canceled sooner or later. It's really frustrating when they market a series as "THE new US hit series" when it's really a show that got canceled after the first season...

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Music ]]

* American music is very popular in the UK and Europe. Of course, for every [[NoDoubt Gwen Stefani]], Music/{{Kesha}}, Music/FooFighters or [[FiftyCent 50 Cent]] that makes it across ThePond, there's a dozen that sink along the way under the weight of their own awfulness.
** To a lesser extent, this also happens the other way round. Americans may hear {{Radiohead}}, Music/{{Muse}} and Music/{{Blur}} and sing the praises of British rock, but how many of them have honestly listened to EnterShikari or The Twang?
** And then there was Bush, a London band who were [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff popular in the States but never made it in their home country]]. While {{Oasis}} were trying to crack America and being promoted as "the new Bush", Bush were trying to crack Britain and being promoted as "the next Oasis"...
** WebVideo/ToddInTheShadows [[http://thatguywiththeglasses.com/videolinks/teamt/tis/tpsr/36593-pop-song-reviews-want-u-back-by-cher-lloyd feels]] that this is the reason why Americans have such a high opinion of British pop music. He admits that, when it's good (like Music/TheBeatles, Music/EllieGoulding, or Music/{{Adele}}), it rivals anything America has to offer. However, he also feels that, as bad as Americans think they have it with their own awful pop music, at least they never had to suffer through the Cheeky Girls, Crazy Frog, Jedward, or the slew of ''[[Series/TheXFactor X-Factor]]'' runners-up (at least, those not named Music/OneDirection or Music/CherLloyd).
* An interesting twist on this in TheSixties was that British artists like Music/TheRollingStones and Music/EricClapton were [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff far more into traditional American blues and R&B]] than Americans were. For many Americans, their first introduction into authentic blues were hearing the Stones and Clapton doing covers of classic tracks. This led to a significant revival of interest in the US, but the oft-titled "[[TheBritishInvasion British Invasion]]" was really, in many ways, just American music being played by British guys.
* Due to Canadian Content regulations and heavy government investment in the arts, the Canadian music scene is ''huge'', punching well above its weight for a nation of only 35 million people. There are some pretty big labels pumping out artists in music hub cities such as Montreal, Vancouver, Toronto, and (surprisingly to many easterners) Calgary. However, ask anyone outside of Canada to name a Canadian artist, and their answer is inevitably "[[Music/JustinBieber Bieber]], Music/{{Avril|Lavigne}}, Music/{{Shania|Twain}}, Music/{{Nickelback}}, Music/{{Drake}}, and... uh... [[Music/CelineDion that Titanic song chick]]".
** In American indie circles, however, Canada gets quite a lot of respect, with some of the genre's biggest artists, such as Music/{{Feist}}, Music/BrokenSocialScene, and Music/ArcadeFire, being Canadian (along with other, less mainstream indie artists).
** Music/AlanisMorissette serves as a prime example. Most Americans were introduced to her through her alt-rock infused ''Jagged Little Pill'' and are unfamiliar with her earlier teen pop career. In Canada, on the other hand, there were protests when her hometown of Ottawa gave her the key to the city in 1996 (one year after ''Pill'' was released), as many at the time still viewed her as the Canadian Music/DebbieGibson.

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Video Games ]]

* Due to their often light plots (except [=RPG=]s) and vast amounts of GratuitousEnglish, many Japanese games are imported in their original form by enthusiasts. Titles that move heavy numbers in this fashion usually end up getting proper translations by domestic publishers (except [=RPG=]s, sob.)
* The import filter (in combination with the NostalgiaFilter) is why many US JRPG lovers who had an SNES tend to think of the 16-bit era as some sort of JRPG Golden Age. In truth, the Super Famicom had as many middling-to-bad [=JRPG=]s as any other system; the U.S. was just lucky, in a sense, that most of the crap never got to the SNES during the system's lifespan.
** This mis-perception is NOT helped by all the good [=JRPG=]s which got fan-translated, such as ''VideoGame/FrontMission, VideoGame/BahamutLagoon, VideoGame/FinalFantasyV, StarOcean, VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3, VideoGame/DragonQuestV, LiveALive,'' and ''VideoGame/TalesOfPhantasia''. ''{{Terranigma}}'' also received a fan-translation; but it ''was'' released in Europe.
** Note that the US thinks that domestical [=RPGs=] entered a sort of dark age on the SNES, with awful games like ''VideoGame/EyeOfTheBeholder'' and ''Obitus''.
* Despite the games not being sold, this is why a lot of ''VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld'' [[GameMod hackers]] tend to think of Japanese hacks as being interesting or better than those from elsewhere, because only the best hacks get shown on Youtube or English speaking sites. People see stuff like BrutalMario, the VIP series and various others being played by raocow and such like and think Japanese hacks are better as a whole, without realising how many mediocre ones are just left to rot on fairly unknown websites. Doesn't help that there's no Japanese SMW Central equivalent to keep them all in one place.

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Visual Novel ]]

* Due to the sheer work involved in translating a VisualNovel[[note]]At the very least, you need someone willing to translate hundreds, usually thousands of kilobytes of pure text (Think Notepad file, not Microsoft Word file) and someone willing to hack the engine. Ideally, you should also have an image editor for those pesky menu icons and still images, and an editor to both check for mistakes and help make the text flow naturally in English. They all have to be motivated to spend their free time for the sake of one VisualNovel for months if not years.[[/note]] and the obscurity of the medium as a whole, especially in the FanTranslation scene, ImportFilter applies. Oddly enough, it is stronger for fan translators than official visual novel localization companies because the many of the more famous VisualNovel creators such as Creator/AliceSoft or KeyVisualArts are unwilling to sell licenses officially and because PornWithoutPlot {{H-Game}}s [[SexSells sell easily]] without requiring a lot of work in translation.

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Real Life ]]

* A variation of this occurs with manufactured goods, and is practiced especially broadly by Japanese car manufacturers; When a new model is introduced, it's offered only in the home market while the old one continues to be made for export markets. Only after a year or so, once all the teething troubles are worked out (and in extreme cases the first-year home market buyers have been, in effect, paying beta testers) is the new type released for export.
** It's common for electronics. Sony et al can sell bleeding-edge stuff in Akibara while they work out the bugs and learn how to make it cheaper. For cars it is mostly only true of experimental designs (hybrids etc..) Occasionally a JDM (Japanese Domestic Market) vehicle will be re-designed for foreign sales (like the Honda Fit and the CR-V and Toyota RAV-4 back in the 90s), but a lot of JDM cars never see the states and vice versa.
* The Soviet Union. A positive side effect of the strict censoring of foreign influences was that only the greatest works were actually translated and published in the Soviet states.
* Canada's CRTC places [=CanCon=] restrictions on Canadian television and radio, forcing every channel or station to show at least a certain percentage of media created with the involvement of Canadians. As a result, an American show that has low ratings will likely be dropped quickly, but a Canadian-made show that has low ratings might stay on for a while in really late/early time slots. While this is supposed to encourage Canadian identity, it's led to some people to believe that American shows are better, and in some cases, believe that Canadian stations believe that American shows are better, deliberately making their Canadian-made shows of a poor quality, just to satisfy [=CanCon=] requirements in order to be able to show the American shows they really want to be showing.
* Comic Creator/BillHicks saw very little success in the States while he was alive, but enjoyed great popularity in the UK. He had to die before the States really appreciated him.
* University degrees. The US and UK give a great deal of respect to European degrees; that the reverse is true in Europe.
** Depends where the degree is from. It's probably safe to say that a degree from Oxbridge or the Ivies will carry a great deal of respect anywhere.
** Likewise the elite colleges in Japan are state-run, hence all the cram students in manga and anime trying to get into Tokyo university. Private colleges are only a last resort. Many exchange students are surprised that almost the inverse is true in the US with private universities being the most prestigious while state-run colleges are mainly there to offer affordable education.
* Sadly, this is the case with a great deal of degrees and certificates, [[WorthlessForeignDegree which many immigrants are shocked to find are worthless once they move to a new country]]. Plenty of the immigrants you see doing unskilled work have degrees and certificates in their country of origin that were simply not recognized in their new country for bureaucratic reasons.
* Usually inverted with alcohol: Cheap, easy-to-produce products are shipped overseas as the "definitive" version of the drink from that country while better versions are only readily available domestically. Just ask what Australians think of Foster's, Americans of Budweiser, or the French of the Beaujolais nouveau craze. Or ask an Irishman about the draught Guinness served in Ireland versus the export Guinness sold elsewhere.
* In contrast to the above, Brazil plays the trope straight with one of its best known exports, coffee. The Brazilian coffee seen overseas is generally of way better quality that the usually cheaper domestic brands.
** Similarly, most of the Belgian Chocolate you can buy in Belgium is cheaply made and aimed at tourists. Belgian Chocolate you can get elsewhere indicates a premium product.
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