[[quoteright:259:[[WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/JudgeJoker_7209.png]]]]
[[caption-width-right:259:"[[CourtroomAntic Record? Is someone supposed to be writing this down?]]"]]

->''"There is no such thing as a plea of innocence in my court. A plea of innocence is guilty of wasting my time. Guilty!"''
-->-- '''Inquisitor Lord [[ShoutOut Fyodor Karamazov]]''', ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}''

A Hanging Judge is a ruthless judge who rules his courtroom with an iron fist as his own personal fiefdom. He will hand out brutal sentences [[AllCrimesAreEqual for the most minor infractions]]. He may be corrupt and using the law for his own ends, a CorruptHick using his power to dominate the local community, a KnightTemplar who believes his punishments are justified, or a bully who gets off on abusing his power. Any hero who ends up in front of him can expect no mercy and precious little justice. You better have an AmoralAttorney at your side when you confront the Hanging Judge in the courtroom, or it's guaranteed that you won't walk out as a free bird after the trial.

A subtrope of TheJudge. This character typically presides over a KangarooCourt and can give {{Longer Than Life Sentence}}s. See also the equally-bad JokerJury.
----
!!Examples

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:Anime and Manga]]
* ''{{Gankutsuou}}'': Villefort will send even a pickpocket to the guillotine for [[AllCrimesAreEqual undermining the fabric of society]].
* ''Franchise/OnePiece'': The judge of Enies Lobby's KangarooCourt is Baskerville, who [[ExactWords appears]] to be a three-headed man. The right head favors convictions, while the left head suggests declaring the defendant innocent. The center head prefers the 'compromise' of death sentences.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Comic Books]]
* [[MeaningfulName Judge Gallows]] from ''ComicBook/TheSandman'' spin-off ''TheDreaming'' (and the earlier horror anthology ''{{Unexpected}}'').
* ''ComicBook/JudgeDredd'' is a protagonist example. He's ''not'' corrupt, the laws are just ''that'' ruthless. Anyone who willingly gives up, though, receives a (relatively light) prison sentence.
** The Dark Judges, however, are this. Judge Death's CatchPhrase is "The crime is life, the sentence is death!" after all.
** Even before becoming a Judge, Sydney (Judge Death's original name) was this. As a trainee Judge, he executed every single person brought before him, even a couple who only wanted a divorce. They reconciled just before the trial in an attempt to avert being judged by Sidney, but to no avail. He executes them for "wasting the court's time" instead.
** This trope is lampshaded when Dredd meets an actual Hanging Judge (or feed-to-flying-rats-judge) in [[{{Mordor}} Cursed Earth]].
* RealLife Wild West lawman Roy Bean is portrayed like this in DonRosa's ''Comicbook/TheLifeAndTimesOfScroogeMcDuck: The Prisoner of White Agony Creek''. He apparently regards kidnapping, assault, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking making a man waste good liquor]], and [[AllCrimesAreEqual all crimes]] as hanging offenses. Fortunately for Scrooge and Goldie, he considers... whatever they were doing that wasn't shown at the end of the comic, perfectly legal.
* Roy Bean also shows up in the ComicBook/LuckyLuke album ''The Judge''. He charges Lucky Luke with theft in order to confiscate the cattle herd Luke was in charge of, assigns a deaf-mute as the defense attorney, and packs the jury with cronies (including the town's undertaker and his own pet black bear). In the end he is revealed to be more of a CorruptHick JerkWithAHeartOfGold who's mostly concerned with lining his own pockets and giving the townspeople a good show: No-one gets worse than fines and confiscation of property because there would be no point in killing his own customers.
* Weird Pete when he is presiding over 'Gamer's Court' in ''ComicStrip/KnightsOfTheDinnerTable''. Quite frankly, any kind of power seems to go to Pete's head.
* ComicBook/JonahHex confronts one in the story "The Hangman" in ''Weird Western Tales'' #35. Marshal Sam Lehman is a CorruptHick who is both the town marshal and judge. He makes almost every offence a hanging offence (such as hanging a saloon girl for filching ten dollars from a drunken cowhand) as the frequent public hangings attract business to the town.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Films -- Animated]]
* Doc Hudson's first appearance in ''{{WesternAnimation/Cars}}'' implies he is one of these.
-->'''Doc Hudson''': All right, I wanna know who's responsible for wrecking my town, Sheriff. I want his hood on a platter! I'm gonna put him in jail till he rots. No, check that... I'm gonna put him in jail till the ''jail'' rots on top of him, then I'm gonna move him to a new jail and let ''that'' jail rot. I'm--
** And that's ''before'' he recognizes Lightning as being [[BerserkButton a race car]].
--->'''Doc Hudson''': Get him ''outta'' here, sheriff! I want him outta my courtroom and I want him outta my town! Case dismissed!
* Judge Claude Frollo in the [[DisneyAnimatedCanon Disney version]] of ''Disney/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame''. (He was an archdeacon in the original novel.)
** While Frollo is obviously the bad guy, the good guys get in on the fun too - Clopin seems to be this in the Court of Miracles.
--> We find you totally innocent... which is the worst crime of all... SO YOU'RE GOING TO HANG!
* In ''TransformersTheMovie'', the Quintesson judge always finds the defendant innocent...unfortunately, [[BizarroWorld being innocent of any crime happens to be a capital offense.]]
-->'''Quintesson Prosecutor''': Before the magistrate renders a verdict, would you like to beg for your lives? It sometimes helps...but not often.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]
* In ''Used Cars'', Judge H. H. Harrison is portrayed as a hanging judge, complete with model guillotine and hangman's noose on his bench. The film's villains take a chance on using Harrison, an honest judge, simply because he's guaranteed to give the harshest sentence should he find the heroes guilty.
** FridgeLogic turns this into an IdiotPlot: surely a cleverer idea would have been to use a ''dis''honest judge and then bribe him into both finding the heroes guilty and imposing the harshest possible sentence?
* Judge Alvin 'J.P' Valkenheiser in the movie ''NothingButTrouble''.
* Judge Doom in ''Film/WhoFramedRogerRabbit''. What makes him even more sinister than the other judges is the fact that Toontown is undisputedly under his power, and he certainly has enough influence around LA to say that [[JudgeJuryAndExecutioner he IS the law-enforcement of the city]]. The good police forces are nothing more than pawns [[JustFollowingOrders just doing their work]].
** The worst part is that he can [[KilledOffForReal kill toons]], who are practically [[CartoonPhysics invincible]] otherwise.
* Judge Hangin' Harry Shoat in ''Film/PrimalFear'' actively embraces this trope, even noting that if hanging were legal, he'd be the first one to pull the lever.
* The first Judge from John Grisham's ''TheRainmaker''.
* The Judge in ''Film/{{Ghostbusters}} 2'', who would've had the Ghostbusters burned at the stake if he could... [[spoiler:until the ghosts of the Scoleri brothers, whom he had sent to the chair in the past, vengefully attacked the courtroom, proving the Ghostbusters weren't a fraud]].
* Eden Fletcher of ''TheProposition'', although he's more of a Whipping You To Death Judge.
* The corrupt sheriff in the 1943 movie ''Border Patrol'' also doubles as the town's hanging judge.
* Judge E. Clarence 'Necktie' Jones from the 1932 JohnWayne movie ''Ride Him, Cowboy''.
* Played for laughs in ''{{Caddyshack}}'':
-->'''Judge Smails''': I've sentenced boys younger than you to the gas chamber. Didn't want to do it. I felt I owed it to them.
* Judge Chamberlain Haller, of ''MyCousinVinny'', is a notable aversion of this trope. He does allow his dislike for Vinny to color his judgment ''once'' and make a bad decision, but on the whole, he's a stickler for proper courtroom procedure and brooks absolutely no nonsense from Vinny or anybody else but is also very fair and ends up praising Vinny's skills as a litigator after he wins the case.
* Judge Turpin from ''Film/SweeneyToddTheDemonBarberOfFleetStreet''. In probably his only courtroom scene, he sentences a 8-year old boy to death.
* As the judge of a KangarooCourt established for the trials and sentencing of Gotham's elite and corrupt after Bane's takeover of Gotham City, [[spoiler: The Scarecrow]] is this in ''Film/TheDarkKnightRises''.
-->'''Gordon:''' [[spoiler:Crane]], if you think we're going to walk out on that ice willingly, you got another thing coming!
-->'''[[spoiler:Scarecrow]]:''' So it's death, then?
-->'''Gordon:''' Looks that way.
-->'''[[spoiler:Scarecrow]]:''' Very well. Death! (''smashes gavel'') [[MortonsFork By exile]].
* Judge Nedra Henderson in ''Film/MovingViolations''. She sentences offenders to a traffic school where she has fixed things with the instructor so that they will fail and she can sell their impounded vehicles.
* ''Film/TheStarChamber'': All of the secret court judges. The only crime they deal with is murder and the punishment for each one is death.
* Judge Fenton is one of these in ''Film/HangEmHigh'', though he believes [[UtopiaJustifiesTheMeans he is entirely justified]].
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Literature]]
* Charles Harness novel ''The Venetian Court''. Judge Spyder abuses his authority in order to execute criminals. He's assisted by the fact that trademark infringement has been made a death penalty offence.
* The Queen of Hearts in ''Literature/AliceInWonderland''. It's supposed to be her husband who is acting as a judge but she does it instead. However, in the book, no one is actually beheaded. The Queen is just an overreactive battleaxe and the King is mostly going through with the trial to humor her.
* The book ''NuklearAge'', by the author of the 8-Bit Theater webcomic, features a courtroom segment presided over by the Honorable Judge Hangemall Letgodsortitout.
* Judge Lawrence Wargrave from ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone''. His nickname was "Hanging Judge" because he gave so many death sentences. [[spoiler: He ''liked'' killing, but had enough of a conscience and sense of justice to become a judge instead of a serial killer -- he preferred to kill only people who deserved it. [[ThanatosGambit The plot of the book is a plan that that would let him die]] only after punishing other "criminals" who had formerly gotten off [[KarmaHoudini scot-free for their crimes]]. ]]
* Lord Hate-good from ''Literature/ThePilgrimsProgress''.
* Justice Hathorne from ''TheDevilAndDanielWebster''. This may also count as TruthInTelevision as Hathorne was the judge who presided over the Salem Witch Trials.
* Creator/BramStoker wrote a short story called ''The Judge's House'' (a ShoutOut to Le Fanu's "An Account of Some Strange Disturbances," below) where the house was haunted by the ghost of a hanging judge.
* In Creator/DanAbnett's Literature/GauntsGhosts novel ''His Last Command'', Commissiar Kanow hands out the death sentences with abandon and explicitly tries to blungeon "Fast appraisal, fast dispatch" into Junior Commissiar Ludd's head. [[spoiler:When he tries summary execution on Gaunt and his team (warrants to be made out next morning), he's [[HostageSituation taken hostage]], and Gaunt tries to [[IfIWantedYouDead reason with him]], fails, and deals with Ludd.]]
* J. S. Le Fanu's short story ''An Account of Some Strange Disturbances in Aungier Street'' features the ghost of a hanging judge. [[spoiler: Unfortunately for anyone who rents his house, the judge ''still'' likes to hang people. The revised version, ''Mr. Justice Harbottle,'' functions as a StartOfDarkness.]]
** Le Fanu's ''Mr. Justice Harbottle'' features a particularly corrupt hanging judge who is punished supernaturally.
* Jaroslav Hašek's anti-war novel, ''The Good Soldier Švejk'' (set during WorldWarI) features a general Fink von Finkenstein, who works as a judge under martial law. His favorite pastime is sentencing people to death; he makes the procedure so quick that he doesn't even say the required "In the name of His Majesty, I sentence you to death by hanging", just "I sentence you to death".
* ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles'' - According to Harry, The Merlin tends to act as one over trials of lawbreakers of magic (with a strong implication that a good chunk of the offenders could be rehabilitated with a proper mentor). But again, Harry isn't exactly the most unbiased source when it comes to The Merlin's actions...
** In The Merlin's eyes, nobody ''can'' be rehabilitated. Considering most people on the Council view Harry as a walking Time Bomb, the Merlin's not the only one who thinks that, so there are very few people willing to take on a warlock and rehabilitate them. In Council trials, the accused is not allowed to speak, and the final verdict is usually based on a soul-gaze given by the Merlin himself. We know of three people to escape the death penalty after being found guilty of using black magic: [[spoiler: Harry's mother]], Harry, and [[spoiler: Molly]]. The first two were taken in and trained by Ebenezer, and Harry claimed responsibility for [[spoiler: Molly]]. Harry's the only one to date for whom rehabilitation has worked. Only time will tell [[spoiler: for Molly, but she did relapse a bit in ''Turn Coat''.]]
* From ''Literature/HarryPotter'', Barty Crouch Senior was the head of magical law enforcement during the time when Voldemort fell from power, and gave those under him the power to kill, rather then capture, fleeing Death Eaters. Typically, they were sent to prison without trial, but those that were lucky enough to receive them would find Crouch the definition of a Hanging Judge, holding no sympathy whatsoever for those accused or any belief that they might be innocent. Fortunately, the jury involved in these trials were typically more level-headed. This all came back to bite Crouch when his son was captured with a group of Death Eaters, and put on trial with them. Crouch was just as unsympathetic and condemning to Junior as he was to everyone else who came before him, and his cold demeanor toward his own son lost him his standing with the Wizarding public, which cost him his potential bid for Minister of Magic.
* In ''Literature/CatchTwentyTwo'', Clevinger faces one of these when he's brought before a KangarooCourt on trumped up charges. When Clevinger tries to protest that punishing him would be a violation of justice, the judge goes into a full blown rant.
-->"That's not what justice is (...) [[DirtyCommies That's what Karl Marx is.]] I'll tell you what justice is. Justice is a knee in the gut from the floor on the chin at night sneaky with a knife brought up down on the magazine of a battleship sandbagged underhanded in the dark without a word of warning. Garroting. That's what justice is when we've all got to be tough enough and rough enough to fight Billy Petrolle. From the hip. Get it?"
* ''MaximumBob'' by ElmoreLeonard was about such a judge -- the title was his nickname, referring to the harsh sentences he handed down. It was adapted into a short TV series starring Beau Bridges.
* JudgeKnott was inspired to go into politics and displace a hangin' judge whose racism led him to destroy a man's livelihood for a minor infraction.
* Archie's father Adam Weir in Creator/RobertLouisStevenson's [[AuthorExistenceFailure unfinished novel]] ''Weir of Hermiston''. Believed to be based on the real life Robert [=McQueen=] (see below).
* The ''KnightAndRogueSeries'' proudly presents Loves-the-Rope Thrope.
* In the ''Literature/JoesWorld'' novels there was a Hanging Judge so extreme that he sentenced other judges to hang for ''not handing out enough death sentences''.
* The ''attitude'' of any judge encountered in a Creator/PGWodehouse story.. as they dish out five-pound fines or in extreme cases condemn the defendant to a month in jail.
* In Neal Stephenson's ''The Diamond Age,'' the judge in neo-Confucianist Shanghai has a hint of this, despite his very casual manner. The plaintiffs say, about the defendant, "That is the guilty party." The judge says to the defendant, "You're guilty." (Which he is--of deliberately crippling the plaintiff--but still.) The defendant says something like, "Don't I get to defend myself?" "Don't be an asshole," says the judge. He then tells the defendant to go to the pier and wait for instructions. While the defendant is waiting, lots of nanomachines kill him in a few minutes. (However, the judge isn't sadistic, but following the legal system and values of his society. And sometimes, when judging people, he takes mitigating factors--like the defendant acting responsibly towards his family--into account and gives a lighter sentence.)
* Justice Ireton in Creator/JohnDicksonCarr's ''Seat of the Scornful'' / ''Death Turns the Tables'' is a Hanging Judge who becomes the prime suspect.
* The Literature/SimonArk short story "The Judges of Hades" takes its title from the nickname of a trio of small town judges (two of whom end up dead). The DA describes their judgements as being devoid of human mercy.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Live-Action TV]]
* Gleefully embodied by Q in his first ([[spoiler:and last]]) appearance on ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration.'' His 'courtroom' is ironically modeled on the {{Kangaroo Court}}s of the early 21st century, when atomic war had reduced Earth to a ''Mad Max'' dystopia.
-->'''Q''': Soldiers, you will press those triggers if this criminal answers with any word other than 'guilty'.
* ''Series/RumpoleOfTheBailey'':
** Judge Roger 'The Mad Bull' Bullingham would undoubtedly hang people if the death penalty still existed in the UK. As it is he despises defence barristers, assumes being on trial automatically indicates you are guilty, and issues biased instructions to the jury.
** A (relatively) poor replacement for Bullingham after the death of the actor who played him (Bill Fraiser) was Mr Justice Graves, often referred to as Mr Injustice Gravestone. He is less agressive than Bullingham but none the less tries to unfairly influence the jury, only with more subtle methods.
** There is also a real 'hanging judge', Mr Justice Vosper, a relic from the days of the noose who summed up dead against one of Rumpoles' old clients, leading to his execution. He was later proved innocent.
** In a subversion from the books, Rumpole once felt it was very unfair when he faced an entirely unbiased judge. The defendant was Indian and Rumpole had been hoping that the somewhat racist judge would show some prejudice during the trial that would allow him to appeal.
* Judge Judy from...''JudgeJudy''. Though to be fair, she is always, ALWAYS right. Just ask her.
* The episode "Judge Dread" of ''Series/LawAndOrder'' featured a judge that was so harsh that her image was used on packets of cocaine to represent ''its'' potency; after she strikes down a white-collar criminal's plea agreement for being too lenient, he is convinced by another con to hire a hitman to kill her.
* An episode of ''LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit'' featured a judge who imposed harsh penalties on juvenile defendants, citing a claim she was sending a message (most of the kids were sent to a facility for sex offenders for minor misdemeanors such as public urination. The case that brought it to their attention. A 16 year old sent a racy photo by text message to her boyfriend, and was tried for distributing child pornography.) The detectives and a defense lawyer soon discovered the prison she was sending the kids to was run by her brother, who gave her a large kickback for every inmate she sent. She was caught accepting bribes in the end. Like many L&O plots, that was based on a true story-- and then copied with significantly less elegance in every other Lawyer Show.
* On ''Series/SquareOneTV'' the judge George Frankly faced in the ''Mathnet'' episode "The Trial of George Frankly" was supposedly a hanging judge.
* Judge Clark Brown from ''Series/BostonLegal''. He's handed out cruel and unusual punishments for some [[FelonyMisdemeanor very minor crimes.]]
* Judge Jefferson Dixon from the ''CowboyGMen'' episode "Hang the Jury".
* Judge Alvarez in the ''Series/ColdCase'' episode "Jurisprudence".
* Mr Justice Kent, the mark in the ''{{Hustle}}'' episode "Lest Ye Be Judged".
* Parodied in the ''Series/JeevesAndWooster'' episode "In Court After the Boat Race (or, Jeeves' Arrival)" which featured a magistrate who treated stealing a policeman's helmet as if it were mass murder and who handed down a five shilling fine as if he were pronouncing the death sentence.
* The judge who passes sentence over the eponymous trio in the sixth episode of ''FilthyRichAndCatflap''.
* General Sir Anthony Cecil Hogmanay Melchett becomes one in ''BlackadderGoesForth'' in a military court. He's completely ready to have Blackadder shot for shooting '''his''' prize pigeon, though Blackadder is supposed on trial for disobeying orders Melchett barely mentions them. He fines the Defence Ł50 for turning up and refers to Blackadder as 'the Flanders Pigeon Murderer'.
** Occurs previously in first series' "Witchsmeller Pursuivant" with a parodied Inquisitor who acts as judge, prosecutor, and executioner. Notably, he puts Blackadder's horse on the witness stand for cross-examination, and helpfully translates everything the horse says, [[InsaneTrollLogic accusing the horse of lying in the process.]]
* ''Series/WantedDeadOrAlive'': In "Miracle at Pot Hole", Randall brings a suspected murderer to Pot Hole, but fears the man won't receive a fair trial when he finds the townspeople in the grip of a power-mad bully who serves as the hanging judge over a KangarooCourt.
* ''Series/{{Justified}}'' has Judge Reardon, (played by Creator/StephenRoot). The show somewhat both [[{{Reconstruction}} reconstructs]] and [[{{Deconstruction}} deconstructs]] the trope with him. He privately explains to Raylan that the reason he sends down such harsh sentences is because of a case early in his career where he gave a dangerous man a light sentence out of sympathy for the man's obvious abuse as a child. Said man proceeded to kill a six-year-old, an act that has haunted Reardon ever since. At the end of the episode it's revealed that the would-be assassin trying to kill him [[spoiler: is aiming to either kill Reardon or try to get killed ''by'' Reardon so his family can get the insurance money. Reardon's harsh sentence, ostensibly to 'straighten out' the man, only ruined his family's lives.]]
* In ''Series/{{Suits}}'', one episode has a judge who sets out to ruin Harvey for supposedly having an affair with his wife. He hands out $1000 fines for minor court infractions before casually dismissing their case, then attempts to blackmail Harvey into admitting to the non-existent affair before he will even consider overturning the ruling.
* In ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'', the judge trying another judge says that he'll follow other judges by emigrating to South Africa, where he can "get some decent sentencing done," unlike in England, where the hardest punishment allowed is life imprisonment:
-->"It's hardly worth coming in in the morning. Now, South Africa? You've got your cat of nine tails, you've got four death sentences a week, you've got cheap drinks, slave labour and a booming stock market. I'm off, I tell you. Yes, I'm up to here with probation and bleeding psychiatric reports. That's it, I'm off. That's it. Right. But I'm going to have one final fling before I leave, so I sentence you to be burnt at the stake."
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Music]]
* ''Go Down Ye Murderers'' by Ewan [=MacColl=] features the lyric "... and the hanging judge, he smiled". Also [[TruthInTelevision Truth in Music]], as according to the Other Wiki, Timothy Evans was hanged in a miscarriage of justice.
* Country artist Vicki Lawrence's ''The Night The Lights Went Out In Georgia'' is about a man executed by a hanging judge after being wrongly accused of killing his cheating wife and her lover. [[spoiler:His sister, the narrator, was the one who killed them both]]. It includes the lyric "...the judge in the town's got bloodstains on his hands."
* Two of Music/BobDylan's songs - 'Seven Curses' and 'Lily, Rosemary and the Jack of Hearts' feature a hanging judge. They are probably not the only ones.
* The judge in the music video for Sammy Hagar's "I Can't Drive 55" is implied to be one of these. He has a model gallows and guillotine on his bench, and his name placard actually reads "Julius Hangman."
* In TheAgonist's song ''Thank You Pain'', the narrator personifies their conscience as one of these.
* [[{{Vocaloid}} Kaito]] as [[{{Greed}} Gallerian]] [[EveryManHasHisPrice Marlon]] is one of these in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d2SXc0dH4K8 "Judgement of Corruption."]] It [[BribeBackfire doesn't]] [[KarmicDeath end well]].
** If ''Capriccio Farce'' is anything to go by, Marlon's successor, the Clockwork Doll might be one of these, too. She sure seemed eager to quickly end the case of Gammon Octo with a death punishment...
* ''Old Judge Jones'' by LesDudek is all about one of these who holds a town in a grip of terror. He forces the citizens to continually re-elect him at gunpoint.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Newspaper Comics]]
* Judge Horatio Curmudgeon Frump from the ''{{Tumbleweeds}}'' comic strip, who hangs a noose from his bonsai tree.
* Playboy cartoonist Brian Savage did quite a few with a judge who would look at a clock showing it's 4:30 and sentence someone to "Oh, four and a half years. In another the judge is shown firing a full clip of bullets into the defendant while a baliff comments "He's never had a ruling overturned."
[[/folder]]
[[folder:Professional Wrestling]]
* Dutch Mantel when he was judge of wrestler's court would ''always'' rule against the prosecuted. One of his favorite targets was one Mean Mark Callous[[Wrestling/TheUndertaker ...oops]].
[[/folder]]
[[folder:Roleplay]]
* Elite Agent French Fries in ''Roleplay/DinoAttackRPG'' is a man who should be kept as far away from any courtroom as possible, considering he is a man who ''will'' have the defendants executed based on incredibly weak evidence and InsaneTrollLogic.
** Incidentally, French Fries's court case was inspired by the aforementioned ''Blackadder'' example. The difference, however is that while General Melchett had a valid reason to be mad at Blackadder (he ''did'' shoot his prized pigeon after all, though it [[{{Understatement}} can't be denied that he was overreacting]]), French Fries has no real grudge on the defendants; he genuinely believes them to be deserving of death by firing squad.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Tabletop Games]]
* As the page quote indicates, more than a few Inquisitors in ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' are like this, though they're more ''[[BurnTheWitch Burning]]'' Judge than Hanging...
** Konrad Curze, the Primarch of the Night Lords, was a VigilanteMan who acted as judge, jury, and executioner on his homeworld of Nostramo. Though he was more of ''[[FlayingAlive Flaying]]'' Judge than Hanging...
** They even recycled the "Judgement of God" TrialByCombat by making the defendant fight an unarmored GreyKnight (God ([[GodEmperor -Emperor]]) is busy keeping the galaxy running). If the defendant is killed, he was obviously a heretic. If the defendant wins, he was obviously aided by Chaos, and is executed as befits an obvious heretic.
* ''TabletopGame/{{Deadlands}}'' has a number:
** A number of [=NPCs=], such as Roy Bean, Isaac Parker and, in ''Hell on Earth'', Richard Tolliver.
** A handful of monsters called the Hanging Judges, which repeat all the sins you've ever committed as they hunt you down. The worst sin? Being Texan - Texans killed them in life due to their being crooked judges who got together as Hanging Judges, killing people over trumped up charges so they could steal all their wealth and land. In fact, the second bestiary actually gives statistics for the original five Hangin' Judges, much tougher than the version in the core rules, delegating the original set of stats as belonging to a "lesser Hangin' Judge" that could be created by them.
** The spin-off CollectibleCardGame ''Doomtown'' included "Hangin' Judge Gabriel", who could [[OneHitKill instantly 'Ace']] any character marked as Wanted. As a bonus, his flavor text was a [[ShoutOut direct reference]] to [[JudgeDredd Judge Death]] (see above). A later set introduced the Hangin' Judge monster from the RPG into the setting of the card game.
* The background for MagicTheGathering's ''Ravnica'' setting has an ''even worse'' possibility: the courtroom is ''someone else'''s personal fiefdom (generally the [[CorruptChurch Orzhov]], or the Dimir, the guild that doesn't exist).
-->"In Otiev's mind, he ruled in favor of the accused. But in his courtroom he was only a spectator, watching his hand deliver the sign of death."
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Theater]]
* Danforth in ''Theatre/TheCrucible''.
* Lord Angelo in [[Creator/WilliamShakespeare Shakespeare's]] ''Theatre/MeasureForMeasure'' starts executing 'fornicators' at first offense: not very nice, even before he [[StrawHypocrite tries to blackmail their sisters]] [[ScarpiaUltimatum into having sex with him]].
* In ''Theatre/TheRiseAndFallOfTheCityOfMahagonny'', Trinity Moses seems a little too keen on the idea of condemning people to death.
* Both versions of Judge Turpin in ''Theatre/SweeneyToddTheDemonBarberOfFleetStreet'', although the fact that the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloody_Code Bloody Code]] was still in force at the time may explain some of it. He's still far from sympathetic.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Videogames]]
* ''VisualNovel/AceAttorney'' has hanging prosecutors, who rule the courtroom with an iron fist (or [[WhipItGood whip]] or [[MustHaveCaffeine coffee cup]]). The judge technically passes the final verdict but is largely ineffectual and the prosecutors can do whatever they want. Thankfully, pushing the judge too far causes him to push back, so justice has a fighting chance.
** One trial has the Judge's brother sort of acting as one mainly thanks to [[BitchInSheepsClothing Dahlia Hawthorne]] having the entire courtroom wrapped around her finger.
* In ''VideoGame/ProfessorLaytonVsAceAttorney'', you are thrown into a KangarooCourt where everybody but you -that is, Judge, prosecutor (or rather, [[TheSpanishInquisition Inquisitor]]) and audience- wants your client to be [[BurnTheWitch thrown into]] [[FamilyUnfriendlyDeath a pit of fire]]. Unlike in the main series, the prosecutor won't make the witnesses tell lies to incriminate the defendant- they'll gladly do it on their own will if that means getting your client to feed the flames.
* The Sheriff of Nottingham in ''VideoGame/TheAdventuresOfRobinHood''.
* ''VisualNovel/DanganRonpa'': In Despair Academy's courtroom, Judge Monokuma already ''[[BigBrotherIsWatching knows]]'' [[BigBrotherIsWatching who's guilty]], and has the [[CruelAndUnusualDeath perfect punishment]] in mind! But if the jury gets it ''wrong'', well, they '''all''' pay the price... and the murderer [[DeadlyGraduation gets to graduate]]!
** And by Chapter 4 [[spoiler: he starts planting false evidence to make the trial more interesting, and by Chapter 5 he's actively interfering with the trial when everyone gets too close to the truth (that there ''was'' no victim; the body was long dead before anyone found it.)]]
* In ''LiberalCrimeSquad'', judges with a Conservative bent are called Hangin' Judges. Aside from not wanting your liberals put on trial by these guys, they're pretty dangerous in direct combat as they can [[TalkingTheMonsterToDeath talk your members into submission.]]
* The Right Honorable Judge Wallace P. Grindstump from ''TalesOfMonkeyIsland'' once he catches the pox. Still, apart from his uncontrollable shouting, he's fairly reasonable for being a bloodthirsty voodoo-pox-stricken pirate judge presiding over a court filled with an equally bloodthirsty, pox-stricken audience of pirates.
** Even with the pox, he's quite a different character outside the courtroom, not the least bit concerned when you escape from jail during recess.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Webcomics]]
* In the ''[[Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick Order of the Stick]],'' the judge for the [[IDontLikeTheSoundOfThatPlace Empire of Blood]].
-->'''Mr. Jones:''' Listen, here there are two types of accused. Those who plead guilty, and those who piss the judge off with a time-consuming trial before being ''found'' guilty.
* Naturally, [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast His Honorable Tyranny]] from ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'', and Terezi acting as a Dredd-esque arbitrator. These are [[ProudWarriorRace trolls]]; there is no defense. "In a courtblock, the word 'defense' itself is offensive."
** The Legislacerators are a sort of combined prosecutor and hanging judge. It's not entirely clear what role the Honorable Tyranny actually plays in a trial; it doesn't ''seem'' to be a troll, and may just be some kind of animal serving as a figurehead.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Western Animation]]
* Judge Constance Harm from ''TheSimpsons''.
* Judge Whitey from ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'', who treads the line between embracing and parodying an AcceptableTarget, filled up every mental asylum in New York when he declared being poor a mental illness.
--> '''Judge Whitey''': [[InsaneTrollLogic Being as I have a ham sandwich with mayonnaise waiting for me at my mansion]], I declare the defendants guilty as charged.
** TruthInTelevision: Poverty really was once considered a mental illness and in a study it is shown that a judge will more likely give a harsher ruling just before his/her lunch break.
* ''HarveyBirdmanAttorneyAtLaw'', especially in regards to Judge Mentok, who often doesn't even pay attention to his own cases - instead whiling away the moments swapping the minds of all the jury members or goofing around with the bailiff. And he's known to just declare guilty verdicts solely based on one piece of evidence.
** He once declared a mistrial because exactly two weeks to the second happened to coincide with Peter Potamus asking the prosecution if he got that thing he sent them (that thing being important to the case, in this instance) and the prosecution had, up until now, failed to acknowledge that yes, they had gotten it. Since Harvey was the one on trial, that's okay then.
** He also goes on the entire series without noticing that the jury is ''exactly the same in every trial'', declaring a mistrial on Harvey's entire legal career. Harvey has to re-plead every single case. At once. In thirty seconds. [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome And he gets every single one of them acquitted again.]]
** Subverted in one episode where he uses his powers to predict the verdict ahead of time, then when the jury votes to acquit, declares "Nope! I'm never wrong! Guilty!". [[spoiler:The subversion is that it was planned; he sends Harvey to his death, but really was in on the entire trial being a set up for a surprise birthday party]].
* The judge in the Invaded episode of ''FostersHomeForImaginaryFriends'' had most of the cast thrown in jail.
* The judge in the ''HomeMovies'' episode where Brendon's bike was destroyed in an accident. Brendon had been riding his bike on the wrong side of the road, and he was struck by a car, head-on. The judge showed ''no'' sympathy toward Brendon who was on trial over said accident, when ''Brendon was nearly killed''. Brendon is 8 years old.
* [[PunnyName Judge Mental]] from [[SpinOff the animated version of]] ''WesternAnimation/{{Beetlejuice}}'' certainly qualifies here since he thinks EVERY punishment equals "sending them to Sandworm Land". Considering that it's usually Beetlejuice himself the judge has to deal with, it's [[JustifiedTrope somewhat justified]].
* In "Trial" on ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'', SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker eagerly takes to this sort of role. When he's introduced as the judge in Batman's [[KangarooCourt trial]], he immediately slams the gavel and pronounces "GUILTY!" (He's persuaded to continue the trial anyway.) After the trial is over with a not-guilty verdict, Joker decides to execute Batman anyway. He even ''calls'' himself "Ol' Hanging Judge Joker" at one point.
* A feline version of the Devil serves as this to a courtroom of demonic cats in Hell in ''PlutosJudgementDay''.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Real Life]]
* Roland Freisler, President of the People's Court during [[UsefulNotes/NaziGermany Nazi era Germany]]. He was known for (as his additional role as being court reporter) manipulating the transcripts to make the defendants guilty, and also for screaming the sentences to defendants - so much that in one politically-charged trial, the news media found it hard to comprehend what he was saying. He also was responsible in his three years on the bench for the majority of the death sentences the court ever issued - including some, like Helmuth Hubener (only 17), [[EvenEvilHasStandards despite the recommendations of the Gestapo against executing him]]. [[LaserGuidedKarma Freisler was killed by a collapsed beam when a bomb fell on his courthouse]].
* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Jeffreys,_1st_Baron_Jeffreys Judge Jeffreys (or to be exact, George Jeffreys, Baron Jeffreys of Wem)]] was called both "the Hanging Judge" and "the Bloody Judge" as a result of his habitual excesses, particularly during the so-called "Bloody Assizes" that marked the putting down of the Monmouth Rebellion of 1685. Jeffreys was notorious for his manipulation of juries and his violent language toward prisoners and witnesses even in that unscrupulous age. He has been a popular figure in historical fiction set in the seventeenth century, and has become for Britons the archetypical Hanging Judge.
** Judge Jeffreys starred in Creator/NealStephenson's ''Literature/TheBaroqueCycle'' as one of the protagonists' nemeses.
** He was also a villain in Creator/PeterSBeagle's ''Tamsin''.
** He appears in Creator/RafaelSabatini's ''Literature/CaptainBloodHisOdyssey'' and in the [[Film/CaptainBlood film]] based thereon; Sabatini incorporates historical dialogue reportedly used by Jeffreys from the bench.
** Jeffreys also appears in the background of M. R. James's [[{{Horror}} ghost story]], "A Neighbour's Landmark," and in person in his "Martin's Close."
** ChristopherLee played Judge Jeffreys in ''The Bloody Judge'' (released in the US under the title ''[[GoryDeadlyOverkillTitleOfFatalDeath Night of the Blood Monster]]'').
* Judge Matthew Begbie of British Columbia, waaaaay back when BC was still a British colony. Interestingly, Judge Begbie earned the nickname well after his death, [[FairForItsDay despite being known during his own time for being fair and merciful]]. He successfully argued for clemency in several cases that would have demanded the death penalty, and was one of only a few colonial judges without racial bias. He was, though, a heck of a DeadpanSnarker.
* John "Maximum John" Sirica, who presided over the Watergate scandal, might qualify. Lawyers who appeared before him gave him the nickname because he always applied the maximum penalty under the relevant sentencing guidelines.
* Judge Roy Bean, "The Law West of the Pecos," gained a reputation as a hanging judge, though he seems to have passed that sentence on only two men -- one of whom escaped.
** It's worth noting too that he played fast and loose with the law, often exceeding his authority or making unauthorized "changes". Though in some cases he was actually ''less'' harsh-for instance, horse theft was a capital offense, but Judge Bean let people go so long as they returned the horses.
* [[OlderThanFeudalism Athenian]] lawgiver Draco is the UrExample, giving us the word "draconian" to describe excessively harsh punishment. It is said that when asked why minor offences get the same death sentence as the serious ones, he said that in his view these lesser crimes deserved them, and he couldn't think of any punishment harsher than death for more serious ones (good thing they [[FateWorseThanDeath didn't have]] TVTropes back then). Incidentally, the Greeks of his time regarded him as a genius and a courageous and enlightened lawgiver.
** [[FairForItsDay Mostly because he also brought several innovations, perhaps the most important being a explicitly written code of law where all literate citizens could read, instead of oral traditions arbitrarily interpreted by a special caste.]]
* Time/Life treats Issac Parker, a Hanging Judge, in a favorable light, claiming that he brought peace to a lawless territory, and, among other things, treated Indians as fairly as whites. According to Time/Life the only reason he hanged so many people was that there was an excess of {{Outlaw}}s in his territory who "needed killin'."
** Parker's reputation for harshness is often overstated; of 13,490 cases tried before his bench, 344 were for capital offenses. Of those, 160 defendants were convicted and sentenced to hang, and only 79 were actually hanged.
* Robert [=McQueen=], Lord Justice Clerk of Scotland from 1788-1799 and sometimes referred to as 'the Scottish Jeffries'. A survey of Scottish historians named as one of the twelve vilest villains in Scottish history.
* Pontius Pilate, the man who sentenced JesusChrist to crucifixion, was not any nicer to the rest of the people in his jurisdiction. In that time, hanging would have been getting off lightly. Pilate was so renowned for brutality, he got recalled to Rome as they felt his harshness was provoking rebellion.
** [[UpToEleven Even worse]] was Gaius Verres, who had been praetor of Sicily. First of all, he extorted so much loot, slaves and capital from Sicily that some have estimated that he actually caused a recession ''on his own''. His handling of corn and grain harvesting was so poor parts of Italy starved and he nearly ended up with a slave revolt. Anyone who confronted him he put on trial for treason or espionage where he was the judge and jury, and sentenced them to death. He was discredited in a case by Marcus Tullius Cicero, where it was revealed that he had sentenced Roman knights to death without trial, in one instance in order to disguise his own corrupt dealings with a gang of pirates (and sexual slavers). The Romans considered this to be a MoralEventHorizon. You will be pleased to hear that he was eventually murdered on the orders of Mark Antony, who [[KarmicDeath wanted some of the art treasures he had thieved from Sicily.]]
* Judge Mark Ciavarella became infamous for his harsh treatment of juvenile offenders, sending children as young as five to detention centers for relatively minor crimes, such as trespassing or even insulting a teacher on Myspace. It was later revealed that he was making obscene amounts of cash from his convictions as the owner of the center paid him for each new prisoner he sent there. He was later ''[[LaserGuidedKarma convicted and sentenced to twenty-eight years in prison]]''. The good folks at ''{{Website/Cracked}}'' probably summed up many people's feelings about him by saying that they'd be "happy with a law that allows each American to kick him in the balls once". Watch here to see [[MamaBear the mother]] of one of his victims [[DrivenToSuicide who killed himself]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H8JRMGP2hg8 cut him a new one]].
* In the {{Philippines}}, the [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Guillotine Club]] was entered only by judges having passed at least a death sentence and some members were [[AndYourRewardIsClothes handing out T-shirts]] emblazoned with the club's name to offenders [[http://www.google.fr/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CC8QFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.gluckman.com%2FDeath%27Penalty2.htm&ei=NZoSUvOlIqSc0wXQpYCACg&usg=AFQjCNHyKS7x9fSOBdg6X8XtUpnHoQOXWw&bvm=bv.50768961,d.d2k they had sentenced to die]] .
* Current Speaker of the [[UsefulNotes/AustralianPolitics Australian House of Representatives]] Bronwyn Bishop (Liberal member for Mackellar) ''relishes'' this role in Question Time. Before she was a RulesLawyer who would have not just one book on standing orders but the whole set that was used for MyRuleFuIsStrongerThanYours with everyone up to and including the Leader of the House and the Prime Minister. Now she lives and breathes by MyRulesAreNotYourRules and despite the Speaker supposedly being unbiased not only does she ignore every challenge by Labor [[{{Hypocrite}} the same ones she made]] she not only ignore Liberal breaches of conduct but joins in. It clearly goes beyond a job and to contempt and hatred more extreme than every fictional HangingJudge put together.
[[/folder]]

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