Farce is very broad comedy, generally appearing in acted media. It's characterized by {{double entendre}}s, misunderstandings, deceptions, and in general very contrived and ridiculous situations. ContrivedCoincidence, so far from being problematic, is required in large doses by the RuleOfFunny. Farce is almost never leisurely-paced; "breakneck" is more apt to describe it. Look for a lot of doors opening and shutting and characters stumbling upon other characters when they're in compromising situations/situations that appear compromising.

See the MistakenForIndex for all of the many misunderstandings in the genre. See FawltyTowersPlot for farces specifically based on escalating lies.

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!!Examples:

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[[folder: Theatre ]]

* Farce was popularized by Georges Feydeau, whose ''La Puce a l'oreille'' (A Flea in Her Ear) was one of the earliest examples of the classic form.
* Creator/OscarWilde's ''TheImportanceOfBeingEarnest''
* Then there was Joe Orton, the 'Oscar Wilde of the Welfare State gentility,' who mixed farce and black comedy to hilarious effect.
* ''Boeing Boeing''
* ''Theatre/LaCageAuxFolles''
* ''LendMeATenor''
* ''Theatre/NoisesOff''
* ''Theatre/{{Oscar}}''
* ''Rumors'' (Neil Simon)
* ''Charley's Aunt''
* ''The School for Scandal''
* ''No Sex, Please, We're British''
* ''A Flea in Her Ear''
* ''Theatre/TheManWhoCameToDinner''
* ''AFunnyThingHappenedOnTheWayToTheForum''
* Pierre Corneille's ''Le Cid'' got the author into trouble with Cardinal Richelieu, who wasn't just a fictional BigBad. Apparently mixing tragedy with farce was considered a bad thing in the 1700s, and the argument between the two even got its own cool sounding name, ''La Querelle du Cid''.
* ''CyranoDeBergerac'': A similar example to ''La Querelle du Cid'', ''CyranoDeBergerac'' is a play which mixes {{Tragedy}} with {{Farce}} with great success, and it even presents Cardinal Richelieu... as TheGhost. It's characterized by [[MistakenForIndex misunderstandings]], [[GambitPileup deceptions]], and in general very contrived and ridiculous situations (PlayingCyrano, for instance), or the Gascon Cadets stumbling upon [[HoYay Cyrano and Christian when they're in a situation that appears compromising]] and a FetchQuest... [[{{Tragedy}} in the middle of the death of the protagonist]].
* ''The Bride of Brackenloch''
* Creator/{{Shakespeare}} loved this trope for his comedies, with ''Theatre/TheComedyOfErrors'' probably being the most overblown one of all.
* ''Theatre/AccidentalDeathOfAnAnarchist''

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[[folder: Television ]]

* ''Series/FawltyTowers'' follows this formula quite closely, most episodes a snowballing sequence of things going from bad to worse via a combination of bad luck and [[UnsympatheticComedyProtagonist Basil Fawlty's]] own magnetism for karmic retribution.
* ''Series/ILoveLucy'' (without the innuendo and double entendres)
* Several ''Series/{{Friends}}'' episodes relied on this, particularly ones that advanced the various story arcs.
* Several episodes of ''Series/{{Coupling}}''
* ''Series/{{Frasier}}''. Not an episode goes by without awkwardly hilarious crises opening up as characters frantically rush around and juggle lies as they try to hide their messes from each other at break-neck speeds, often causing waves of misunderstandings. {{Contrived Coincidence}}s also figured prominently into many plots, generally following the format of someone overhearing a conversation or spotting something private, and drawing entirely the wrong conclusion and going hog-wild as a result.
* ''ThreesCompany'' was so archetypal an example of sitcom farce that many later shows [[ShoutOut explicitly refer to it]] when farcical situations are unfolding. It was even the [[Administrivia/RenamedTropes Former Trope Namer]] for ''the entire'' ''MistakenForIndex'', which used to be called simply "ThreeIsCompany".
* ''Series/AlloAllo''.
* The aptly named RoyalCanadianAirFarce had [[LongRunner several decades]] of breakneck political/cultural comedy under there belt before ending in 2012.
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[[folder: Film ]]

* ''BurnAfterReading''.
* ''Film/TheFifthElement'': has various factions in the movie attempting to impersonate "Korben Dallas" in order to get on a cruise ship to get the cosmic trinket. HilarityEnsues. Each faction has absolutely no contingency plan, and they end up interfering with each other to such an extent that Dallas manages to slip away.
* ''Film/ItsAMadMadMadMadWorld''
* ''Noises Off'' and ''The Bird Cage'' were both based on plays.
* The Creator/DannyKaye film ''Film/TheCourtJester'' features double identities, hypnosis, a GambitPileup worthy of ''Manga/DeathNote'', broad comedy, and fast-paced patter.
* ''Franchise/ThePinkPanther films'': Clouseau is completely unaware of his incompetence. ''A Shot In The Dark'' increases the stakes with the growing pile of bodies apparently murdered by Maria Gambrelli and Clouseau's absurdly steadfast belief in her innocence.
** ''AShotInTheDark'' is also based on a French stage play which [[DolledUpInstallment originally had nothing to do with]] ''The Pink Panther'' and which was not a farce but a murder mystery with some comic elements.
** The Oktoberfest scene in ''The Pink Panther Strikes Again'' is especially farcical. Dozens of assassins attempt to kill Clouseau and a mix of their competitiveness and the French detective's bumbling lead to them all wiping each other out without him even noticing.
* ''The Rules of the Game"
--> [[/folder]]

[[folder: Robert de la Cheyniest ]]
: ''Corneille! Put an end to this farce!''
--> [[/folder]]

[[folder: Corneille ]]
: ''Which one, your lordship?''
* ''Film/TrueLies'' is a farce, when it's not being a kick-ass action flick.
* ''Film/InTheLoop''
* ''Film/ThePalmBeachStory''
* ''Oscar''
* ''Film/WeekendAtBernies''

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[[folder: Literature ]]

* ''Literature/{{E}}''
* ''LocklearLetters''
* LoisMcMasterBujold's ''[[Literature/VorkosiganSaga A Civil Campaign]]''
* Just about everything written by TomSharpe especially ''{{Wilt}}''
* Creator/PGWodehouse was the master of the literary farce. Everything flows from one misunderstanding or blunder to another, culminating to a perfect mess and an even more perfect rescue.

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[[folder: Webcomics ]]

* The "Dinner for Six" arc in ''PennyAndAggie'' involves escalating misunderstandings, mistaken identities, compromising situations and contrived, {{Slapstick}} accidents.

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[[folder: Western Animation ]]

* ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'': "Into the Wild Green Yonder" hinges on this, particularly in the third act.
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