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A serial work that takes as much time getting to the three-quarter mark as it did getting to the half-way mark. And then as much time again on the next eighth. And so on.

The [[MythArc main storyline]] advances initially, but later all but comes to a halt. The rate at which PlotCoupons are collected drops dramatically, until it reaches a point where, for the A-story, StatusQuoIsGod. This can follow from the writer's understandable desire to avoid resolving the overarching plotline -- the one that is providing the core tension sustaining the work.

There are several ways to make this work. First and foremost are [[StoryArc sub-plots]]. And sub-sub-plots, etc. The advantage is twofold: sub-plots take the weight off the main plot and they provide an opportunity for storytelling in their own right. For maximum effect this trope is combined with multiple PlotThreads, advancing each sub-plot in turn. If too many threads are left unresolved however, the series can descend into a KudzuPlot.

Another way to keep the A-story stable is the repeated discovery of TheManBehindTheMan, often coupled with the SortingAlgorithmOfEvil. As TheHero triumphs over a foe, he repeatedly finds out about an ''even worse'' foe out to get him. If all else fails, the writers can resort to {{filler}}. [[note]]Use of the ResetButton is another technique, but not covered by this trope.[[/note]]

A measure of caution must be taken when employing this trope, however. As the plot slows down, ArcFatigue may begin to make itself felt, and if it's done particularly badly, it may well lead to the audience giving up on the work, especially if years go by without the characters making any kind of meaningful progress in the main plot and it's determined that [[FailureIsTheOnlyOption any attempt by the characters to make progress will meet with failure]].

All series must end eventually, one way or the other. Sadly, some series are CutShort; RealLifeWritesThePlot and it's LeftHanging because of money problems and/or AuthorExistenceFailure. Sometimes a series is not profitable enough to continue, but a short work is made to WrapItUp. Other series end more naturally; the A-plot is taken out of the freezer, lightly microwaved with some lead-up and given a satisfying resolution.

Compare and contrast CosmicDeadline.
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!!Examples:

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[[folder: Anime and Manga ]]

* The ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' anime follows the above formula almost ''exactly''. Originally it was working up to a conclusion, then [[CashCowFranchise it got a popularity explosion]] and the executives [[LongRunners wouldn't let it finish]].
* ''Manga/OnePiece''. Going through East Blue to get to the Grand Line took 62 episodes. They are past 500 episodes and are still in the Grand Line, and the Grand Line is now split up with the New World as a second goal that they must reach before they can actually get to the One Piece.
* ''Manga/{{Bleach}}'': The bad guys introduced at around Volume 20 take up the next 15 volumes by themselves, with a further six split between those enemies and the Big Bad's big invasion.
* ''Manga/RanmaOneHalf'' does this to focus on being an episodic comedy series without worrying about maintaining any sort of continuity or major plot arc.
* ''Manga/{{Inuyasha}}'' Episode 1: Kagome travels back in time. Episode 3: Kagome and Inuyasha start searching for shards of the Shikon jewel. Episode 24: All of the major protagonists have been introduced, except Koga. Episode 36: Koga. Episodes 96 - 101: Individual filler episodes. 102 - 122: Fighting. Episode 167: The show OvertookTheManga so they just [[CutShort don't make any more episodes]]. It wasn't until the manga finally ended when the anime was UnCancelled to adapt the rest.
* ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'': Averted. The two main plots are A. the TitleCharacter's plan to advance up the ninja ladder and ultimately [[ToBeAMaster reach the highest ranking possible]]; and B. The BigBad's master plan to collect 9 [[SealedEvilInACan Sealed Evils in a Can]] and bring about TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt. These two plots- and the genre- obviously and readily lend themselves to this sort of plot progression, but [[spoiler:A. For nearly all of the manga Naruto never gets to advance past even the most basic ranking, getting closer to his goal by other means; and B. The BigBad collects the first on screen, then 6 of the remaining 8 Sealed Evils off-panel and without much fanfare, and his desire to get his hands on the last two pretty much sits there in the background without dictating the plot pace at all until he finds a way to complete his plans, again, by other means]]. Then Naruto sets a main goal for 300+ episodes to bring back Sasuke, which happens to be the plot with the least advancement of any of them and [[spoiler:is effectively resolved by somebody else with almost no input from Naruto at all.]]

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Literature ]]

* When the first book of ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' was written, it was intended as part of a trilogy; GeorgeRRMartin is now hoping to wrap things up in Book 7. Book 4 (in particular) seems to have been the height of the Plot Decay: it's essentially a WhereAreTheyNowEpilogue for the survivors of the first StoryArc, and while two more arcs have been building slowly in the background, they are found only in Book 5.
* ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'': RobertJordan originally planned for the series to be a trilogy. Before too long had passed he realized he would need six books to finish. He [[AuthorExistenceFailure died]] working on a twelfth and final volume. BrandonSanderson, hired to complete it, needed ''three'' to get it all done, though at least the pace has picked up and we're no longer getting books that are [[PutOnABus entirely missing one of the three male leads]]. Book ten is set almost entirely in the week ''preceding'' the end of the ninth book and contains quite literally no plot developments for any of the twenty or thirty storylines it checks in on more or less just to remind you they exist. The one actual thing that actually happened occurred at the end of the previous book, making volume 10 such an epic waste of the reader's time that it crosses over into being essentially a self-referential joke.
* This seems to be where ''Literature/{{Safehold}}'' is headed as of the fourth book. Characters are [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters added]] faster than they're [[ThePlotReaper killed off]], and with all the checking in on minor figures like Gorjah, hundreds of pages can pass before the big players like Nahrman so much as make an appearance. And of course, since many of those big players are spying on everyone else, they spend a lot of pages discussing new developments before they actually decide to take action on any given situation.
** Book 5 finishes what was originally going to be book 1. ''Literature/HonorHarrington'' has just his the second half of the story in book 14.
** Safehold gets better by the end of book five and as of book six it gets more speed, as various CharacterDevelopment story arcs are wrapped up and long-awaited [[spoiler: war on the main continent]] finally starts.
** DavidWeber in the past couple years became an adopted parent, and thus has stated between his own tendency for doorstoppers and a need to pay for college he's deliberately splitting up novels.

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Live Action TV ]]

* ''Series/KamenRiderAgito'' follows this trope exactly. The first one-third to half is pretty interesting, and then the ArcFatigue kicks in and [[ChrisCarterEffect things go unresolved for a long while]], after which they're [[CosmicDeadline tied up in a hurry in the finale]]. Unfortunately, this happens to be a SignatureStyle of the main writer, ToshikiInoue. A similar condition returns in ''[[Series/KamenRiderFaiz Kamen Rider 555]]'', also by Inoue, only with less favorable results.

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Video Games ]]

* Some of the quest series in ''VideoGame/{{Runescape}}''. The main examples are Elves, Menaphos and Morytania quest series. They started at rather fast pace when they were released, but each installment will either grant less progress than the previous installment of the quest series or suffers from ScheduleSlip. Later though a few of the quest series have still been wrapped up.
* The first half of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'' builds up the entire setting, has all the major conflicts, sets up the BigBad, and (except for a couple of stragglers) introduces all the party members and characters. The entire second-half of the game is a fetch-quest to recover your party (And it's ''optional''), and the final dungeon.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII'': The first quarter of the game has you breaking into a palace, escaping, getting arrested, meeting the guy who killed your brother, escaping from there, your girlfriend getting kidnapped, you go to rescue her, get arrested again, and escape again. The second quarter has you going on a longish fetch quest, then one of your party members betrays you and dies.\\
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The third and most of the fourth quarter has you trek half across the world to find out how to use the [[MacGuffin shiny paperweight]] you fetched, then treking across the other half of the world to find out how to destroy it, then trekking across the entire map to destroy the rest, then trekking ''back'' across the map to find out how to make more. It's only in the second-last dungeon that the plot finds itself again and the plot threads that have been left hanging for half the game are resolved.
* KnightsOfTheOldRepublic 2 does this. On one planet, you're trying to deal with the local mob. When you return to your ship, you're asked to meet the local boss of the mob. On your way, you get accosted by a woman who drugs you, takes your place then she gets captures so you have to rescue her, then you get captured so your party has to rescue you, but first they have to gather the items you need to draw the mob boss out of hiding, then storm his ship. At this point you've probably been on the planet for quite a while and have every reason to believe that you're almost done when you finally get that initial summons.

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Webcomics ]]

* ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}''
** It's been well-telegraphed that the story will take place in 7 acts. But Act 5 consists of Act 5 Act 1, which quadruple the main cast size, and Act 5 Act 2, almost as long as the previous four-plus-one acts combined. Then Act 6 doubles the cast size again and consists of six acts, each of which is followed by a comparably long intermission. ''Then'' the end of Act 6 Act 5 turns into the introduction of [[OverlyLongGag Act 6 Act 5 Act 2]]. Which then becomes part of a greater joke when the story ''goes back'' to Act 6 Act 5 Act 1, and then becomes Act 6 Act 5 Act 1 x2 Combo. Then Act 6 Intermission 5 has 6 intermissions. ''Then'' Act 6 Act 6 will also have six sub-sub-acts, with their own sub-sub-intermissions. The ultimate plan for a final resolution is "It will be done when it's done."
* ''Webcomic/GirlGenius'': Agatha has been trying to get into and/or repair Castle Heterodyne for at least two years now. Tarvek was critically ill and about to die for just short of 15 months. The general concept is [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] in [[http://www.girlgeniusonline.com/comic.php?date=20091211 this strip]]. And again [[http://www.girlgeniusonline.com/comic.php?date=20100521 here]], "It only ''seem'' like deyz been in de kestle a long time!"

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Western Animation ]]

* In ''PiratesOfDarkWater'', the crew got their hands on the first two of the thirteen treasures of rule in the five episode mini-series, five more in the next eight episode 1st season, before taking the entirety of the second season to get their hands on one more. Then came cancellation with only 8/13 found [[note]]and enough filler episodes that could have been used instead to finish the story[[/note]].

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