The inverse of HereditaryRepublic, this is when a monarch does not automatically inherit the throne, but is instead chosen by a group of people, usually a select few. This has been done in RealLife, most notably by the UsefulNotes/HolyRomanEmpire and with ThePope.

OfferedTheCrown as the standard practice.
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!!Examples:

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder: Anime and Manga]]
* ''MobileSuitGundamSEED'' and the rest of the Cosmic Era timeline includes the tiny but powerful pacific nation called the "Orb Union" ruled by a elected legislature ā la most constitutional monarchies but also by, not one, but '''five''' noble families, the most prominent is current ruling family, the Athhas while most of the rest are featured in the side stories like Astray, all five must agree on decisions that affect the rest of the country and voting for a "Chief Representative", the official head of state amongst their Lords (though Cagalli Yula Athha, Princess of Orb directly inherited her Father's, Lord Uzumi's position).
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[[folder: Film]]
* ''Franchise/StarWars'': Naboo's democratic monarchy, in which the ruler is elected and even has term limits. It seems more like a republic, just one that grants their presidents the trappings of royalty. [[EpilepticTrees One might speculate]] that perhaps it was once a regular monarchy which the government slowly watered down into a non-hereditary, limited-time position.
** According to DarthPlagueis, thats exactly what happened.
* ''Franchise/PiratesOfTheCaribbean'': The Pirate King is elected by the nine pirate lords; there have been very few kings because the lords tend to just vote for themselves.[[spoiler: Jack surprises everyone by voting for Elizabeth.]]
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[[folder: Jokes]]
* "In a democracy, it's your vote that counts. In feudalism, it's your count that votes" (probably lends itself to the arrangement specified in this trope).
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[[folder: Literature]]
* In the ''Literature/{{Belgariad}}'' series, Sendaria is this, and ''everyone'' can vote. Not even the monarch takes the monarchy seriously. Also, the Empire of Tolnedra elects a new Emperor if the old one dies without an heir.
* In ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'', royalty is normally hereditary, but a hundred years before the series takes place, the Blackfyre Rebellion occurred because the king legitimized his bastard sons on his deathbed and in so doing created a ''massive'' SuccessionCrisis (there were rumours that the trueborn brother, who was also the eldest, was actually the king's brother's son, and the eldest bastard, Daemon Blackfyre, believing them, rose up against him). Several years and a few thousand bodies later, the only Targaryen heirs left were either children or mentally unstable. A Great Council was formed from many of the ruling lords to choose the next king. They passed through many candidates in the Targaryen family tree before settling on Aegon V, a fourth son of a fourth son, hereafter known as Aegon "The Unlikely". After choosing the next king, the Great Council dissolved and the crown passed on through the family, though in the prelude to the War of the Five Kings, the possibility of another Great Council being formed is brought up due to the disputed heritage and validity of nearly all the contenders' claims to the throne.
** The Ironborn ostensibly follow the same agnatic-cognatic primogeniture as five of the other six kingdoms, but in practice, there is enough resistance when a woman is next in line to inherit that they revive their centuries-dead tradition of a kingsmoot instead. [[spoiler: The crown winds up going to the man who ''would'' have been heir in an agnatic (male-only) primogeniture system. No word yet on if they'll codify this or stick with an elective monarchy.]]
** The Wildlings occasionally elect a "king beyond the wall", which is simply a title given to whichever one of them manages to unite sufficiently many wildlings to follow his leadership. Mance Rayder is king beyond the wall during the events of the book, and holds it entirely on merit.
* An interesting case in MikhailAkhmanov's ''[[ArrivalsFromTheDark Envoy from the Heavens]]'' with TheEmpire on planet Osier, which has been stuck in MedievalStasis for at least a thousand years, which is the reason why the protagonist is sent there in the first place -- to figure out why all their efforts to secretly advance the culture have failed. The sovereign of the Empire dies, his son does not necessarily ascend to the throne. Any (male) member of the royal family may become the next ruler, provided they are popular and influential enough within the family. In essence, the emperor is chosen by vote, but only from members of the royal house.
** This shows that despite the name, the Empire is far from being evil. In fact, it ruled the inhabited continent for so long (with only a few small kingdoms bordering it), that the emperors see no need to be cruel to enforce their will.
* In the Literature/TalesOfKolmar the [[OurDragonsAreDifferent Kantri]] are ruled by a king or queen chosen by all of them, and in that position for life or until the others decide to give the rank to someone else. It's more a position of public service than privilege. The rank is interchangeably king/queen or "lord".
* In Fiona Patton's TalesOfTheBranionRealm, Gwyneth, an [[FantasyCounterpartCulture expy]] of Wales, is independent for part of the series, and the Princes of Gwyneth are elected. This ends when a grandson of the current Prince becomes monarch of nearby Branion-other books make it clear that Gwyneth was subsumed and its Prince is now the heir to the Branion throne. Since the series was written in chronological reverse, this [[DoomedByCanon foredooms]] one character's intent to keep Gwyneth independent.
* The Weald in ''The Hallowed Hunt'', the third book in the Literature/{{Chalion}} series by Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold. A FantasyCounterpartCulture of the Holy Roman Empire (see Real Life section below) the new Hallow King is officially elected by the heads of five great houses and three influential church members (who have replaced three houses whose lines have died out or fallen out of power). The last few generations have seen the current ruling house have their eldest sons confirmed as heirs while the old kings are still alive, eventually turning it into a normal hereditary monarchy.
* In Literature/BelisariusSeries all Axumite Emperors are ceremonially approved by the soldiers. While birth does factor it is not final.
* The dwarf clan chiefs in the Literature/InheritanceCycle vote for their new king or queen upon the creation of a vacancy in the position. In ''Brisingr'', after the death of LaResistance-friendly King Hrothgar, a few isolationist clans [[spoiler:unsuccessfully]] oppose the royal candidacy of Orik, his nephew and heir.
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[[folder: Tabletop Games]]
* In the Empire ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'' elects their emperors in essentially the same way as the Holy Roman Empire, with the provincial nobles and the high priests selecting one of their number. A system put in place after the first emperor [[AscendedToAHigherPlaneOfExistence died and was deified]] without designating an heir.
** The High Elves have a similar system for the position of Phoenix King, although their Everqueen is a hereditary monarch. Caledor II, son of Caledor the Conqueror, left the elves with such a distaste for nepotistic Phoenix Kings that they have ''never'' appointed the son of the previous king since then.
* In {{Traveller}} one of the two main ''official'' powers the Imperial Moot (all the nobles in the Imperium who have the time to show up) has is to veto or confirm the Emperor's choice of succession and to dissolve the Imperium. The second power was given as a "mutual assured destruction" should one noble house become to overbearing. But the first makes the Third Imperium a sort of hereditary/elective monarchy. In practice the moot has a lot of other powers because they have the interests of eleven thousand planets to juggle and TheEmperor's exalted status does not give him more then twenty four hours a day to go through all that paperwork.
** In practice the power of veto over succession is seldom exercised and The Imperium is closer to a hereditary monarchy. All this convoluted political tangle is realistic and shows just how complicated such things can be. One of the few instances in which the Moot does not simply confirm the chosen heir is when the [[KlingonPromotion Right of Assassination]] is invoked, in which case the Moot has to decide whether the assassin's claim is legit. Of course the first time someone claimed the throne that way the Moot had planned it after realizing how [[TheCaligula insane]] Cleon III was.
* In ''TabletopGame/BattleTech'' the Rasalhague Principality/Free Republic/Dominion had their ruling Princes elected by parliament for up to two ten-year terms, from among members of the royal family and usually the previous Prince's son. When the Free Republic was conquered by the Clans the Elected Prince's son Ragnar Magnusson was taken as a bondsman by first Clan Wolf and then Clan Ghost Bear, where he earned freedom and rose to the rank of Star Colonel. Surprisingly the remnants of the Republic elected him Prince, enabling him to negotiate the merger of Clan Ghost Bear and the Free Rasalhague Republic into the Rasalhague Dominion.
** The Clans themselves also use elections to determine who will be their Khan. The Clan Council (made up of several hundred bloodnamed warriors) chooses a Khan from amongst themselves. If a runner up or rival faction does not like the result a [[TrialByCombat Trial Of Refusal]] usually settles things. A Khan can also be removed at any time with a simple majority vote, again likely to be contested by trial.
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[[folder: Theatre]]
* In the world of Shakespeare's ''{{Hamlet}}'', the Danish monarchy is elective, as it also was in reality until the late 1600s (though in practice, the eldest son was pretty much always elected). This is the reason why Claudius is king instead of Hamlet himself. Hamlet describes his uncle as having "popp'd in between the election and my hopes", and later says that he foresees that "the election lights on Fortinbras" as he himself is dying and Fortinbras has invaded with a large army.
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[[folder: Video Games]]
* ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess Twilight Princess]]'' has the Twili, but it's never elaborated any further.
* Ferelden in ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins''. The king is elected by the Landsmeet, a congress of the land's most powerful nobles.
** That's only in extreme cases, when the line of succession isn't clear. The Theirin dynasty has a long history of rule, broken only temporarily during the Orlesian occupation, and restored when Maric Theirin, the grandson of the Theirin king who was too weak to hold off the Orlesians, manages (with some help) to drive off the occupying forces and regains the crown.
** Actually, it was a regular occurrence and the SuccessionCrisis actually emerged because Loghain did not immediately seek legitimacy from the nobility. One of the biggest gripes the Fereldans had against Orlais was that the Landsmeet was not convened, ''ever'', and the Orlesian king was an appointed toady of the Emperor. The King is expected to convene the Landsmeet regularly, SuccessionCrisis or not. While the nobles probably can't actually remove the king with any method short of war, not consulting with them would likely mean they would choose another successor from another family once he had died. The Theirins had a long history of rule because the founder of their line was the FounderOfTheKingdom and, with a few exceptions, they were generally good rulers.
** It goes further down than that. The Banns (the lowest form of titled nobility, sort of like Barons) are elected from the local gentry by the Freeholds (free men and women) to protect them in exchange of allegiance.
** According to Zevran, Antivan kings are also elected -- with the added complication of getting to the election without being assassinated by the Crows. If no-one has the nerve, the Crows go after the people they think should run. "Never let it be said that the Crows are not patriots."
** The Dwarven Kingdom of Orzammar. The King appoints a heir and the Assembly usually approves it, but they can reject the former King's first choice in the past and select their own.
* ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'': Skyrim has a High King who is elected by the nine Jarls in the province. Before the game begins, Ulfric Stormcloak killed King Torygg and started a rebellion against the Empire with the intent of having himself proclaimed High King. The Empire prefers the acting ruler, Torygg's widow Elisif. The [[PlayerCharacter Dovahkiin's]] choice of side in the Civil War storyline decides the issue.
* The Kingdom of Rhodoks in VideoGame/MountAndBlade games. As one of your followers notes, even though Rhodok citizens [[CulturalPosturing consider themselves superior to the other lands of Calradia]] due to having a more civilised means of government, in practise they still have a ruling elite of lords and a downtrodden peasant class, same as all the other kingdoms.
* On the Capricorn server of ''ImperiumNova'' the empire became a constitutional monarchy with the emperor elected by the imperial houses every five (in-game) years. Though a military coup by House Canaigh briefly removed the elective element from the monarchy.
* In ''JaggedAlliance 2'', according to the background information, the country of Arulco ran on a version of this, with new rulers elected every ten years. Most of the country's history involved only two families being considered worthy of ruling: the Chivaldoris and the Cordonas, the former of which ruled the country for most of its history and the latter of which ruled during World War II. It all eventually crashed down when the current king, Enrico Chivaldori, was elected, and his wife, Deidrianna, launched a coup that turned into a brutal, nine-year-long dictatorship.
* This is one of the succession options available to feudal rulers of kingdoms and empires in ''VideoGame/CrusaderKings 2''. Under elective succession, all of the dukes of the realm, plus the sovereign, get to vote on the heir to the crown. Used properly, it's extremely powerful, as it allows the player to select the most suitable heir, rather than the doddering idiot who just happened to be born first. Used improperly, it can result in your hard-earned imperial crown being wrested from your dynasty entirely. Appropriately, it's the default succession style of the HolyRomanEmpire-- see below.
** A later patch added the 'Tanistry' succession law to the game which can be chosen by Irish-culture [=AIs=] or the player's realm. On the plus side candidacy is restricted to members of the ruling dynasty, so no losing titles to popular underlings. On the negative side ''every'' landed noble in the realm gets a vote not just the dukes, so getting the winner you actually want becomes near-impossible.
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[[folder: Webcomic]]
* King David Johann of Callan in ''DominicDeegan'', though the first elected king due to being the first human archmage ([[spoiler: and the hereditary king and queen having been assassinated by him]]).
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[[folder: Real Life]]
* As a general rule, most monarchies were a combination of Elective and Hereditary whenever nobles had any usable degree of power; in a legally elective monarchy, the family of the previous King was often influential, and stood to gain prestige and favors (and thus votes). In a legally hereditary monarchy, rightful successors were known to be passed over for a more effective or popular family member, as an inability to control their vassals would result in the dynasty losing control of the monarchy. The end result of this was that certain nobles would make their wishes for the succession known directly to the king, who often had to balance the legal succession laws with the reality of the situation for the sake of a stable realm. While not legally elective monarchies, they had similar effects and political dynamics.
* The Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, especially after the last of the Jagiellons died without issue in 1573. It was even known as the Polish-Lithuanian ''Commonwealth''. With a king. One may claim it was a republic with lifelong presidential term (compare with Venice below).
* The UsefulNotes/HolyRomanEmpire (of the German Nation): Since the Golden Bull of 1356 the Emperor was elected by a group of four secular prince-electors (namely the King of Bohemia, the Margrave of Brandenburg, the Count Palatine of the Rhine, and the Duke of Saxony) and three prince-archbishops (of Mainz, Trier, and Cologne; the archbishops were secular rulers as well as clergy). Before that there had also been elections of German kings and anti-kings,[[note]]Until the 16th century it was only popes who could make Holy Roman Emperors.[[/note]] but which of the secular and clerical greats of the Empire were entitled to vote was not clear.
** Usually, anyway-the claim to the electorate of the Wittelsbach dynasty was split in between the Count Palatine and the Duke of Bavaria, and sometimes Bavaria stepped in for the Palatinate or Bohemia (when the rival Wittelsbachs conspired with each other to exclude him on the grounds that he wasn't German). After the Reformation, the Palatinate Wittelsbachs were Protestants and the Bavarian ones Catholics, so early in the UsefulNotes/ThirtyYearsWar the electoral title was given to the Bavarians, but in the Peace of Westphalia it was decided that both would get to be electors bringing the total to eight.
*** At the end of the 17th century a ninth electorate was added for the Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg-who became known as the Elector of Hanover-as a Catholic junior branch of the Palatinate Wittelsbachs inherited the territory, and it was felt necessary to restore the religious balance. Later, in the 1770s, the Bavarian Wittelsbachs died out, which in the end led to the Catholic Counts Palatine ruling Bavaria, as well; however, it was agreed that he would only have one vote (not [[TheFrenchRevolution that it]] [[NapoleonicWars ended up]] [[AllTheLittleGermanies mattering]]). The Electors of Hanover, incidentally, became TheHouseOfHanover in Great Britain, meaning that the British monarch had a nominal hand in choosing the Emperor for about 100 years.
** Note that in practice, the Imperial title became hereditary within the House of Habsburg towards the end of the 15th century, and that the Electors generally did not keep the "obvious" heir from the throne until the WarOfTheAustrianSuccession. But before that there was a period when the Electors voted for the candidates of the Houses of Wittelsbach, Luxemburg and Habsburg in alternation.
* The United Arab Emirates, in theory at any rate: although the President is supposedly elected by the rulers of the seven emirates of the UAE, it's always the Emir of Abu Dhabi who holds the position of President, and the President always appoints the Emir of Dubai Prime Minister (unless the Emir of Dubai doesn't want/can't take the job, in which case his heir apparent takes it).
* In Denmark, the kings were selected from at least the Viking age until 1660. With a single exception all kings (and one woman, Queen Margrethe I, titled "Principal Lady and Husband of the North") came from the same family though, even if some spring around in the family tree were needed now and then. But it kept on, so today ruling queen Margrethe II can look back on a millennium-old family tree of Danish kings.
* In the same vein, Sweden elected its kings until the end of the 15th century, and all free men could vote. Of course, vote for the wrong candidate and you get your teeth kicked in, but hey, it's the thought that counts.
* The medieval kings of Norway were likewise elected. The kings had to be recognized by the ruling body of nobles (Riksrådet) before being crowned. Before that, the commons, most often the farmers, had to recognize the kings at an open assembly. Historians are at odds on how this exactly worked when Denmark and Norway became a union, as Norwegians claim that ''they'' elected their kings, while Denmark was hereditary. The status for the union kings until 1660 was therefore: Crowned in Denmark and "elected" in Norway. Absolutism made an end to that mess.
** To make things even more interesting: The founder of the modern royal family in Norway, Haakon VII/Prince Carl of Denmark, actually insisted on a referendum before taking position as king. Thus, he was actually originally elected by the Norwegian politicians. The referendum stated the support for monarchy.
* [[UsefulNotes/ThePope The Roman Catholic Pope]] is indeed considered a monarch; as the King of UsefulNotes/VaticanCity and head of the Church simultaneously, he is the last absolute monarch in Europe and one of the last in the world. He is elected by a group of cardinals from among their number[[note]]Technically they can choose any Catholic man as Pope (though a layman would have to be elevated to priest, then deacon, then bishop, before enthronement). In practice, only cardinals have been elected for over a thousand years.[[/note]] hereditary monarchy being a rather difficult proposition for celibate Catholic clergy. And in 2013, the Pope Emeritus Ratzinger proved that the office isn't necessarily for life.
* France was at times, but each time one king sidestepped it by having his son crowned while he was still alive, and by the time the son died the monarchy was hereditary again.
* The Most Serene Republic of Venice was one for all intents and purposes, given that the head of state ([=dux/doge/duke=]) was elected for life.
* The King of Cambodia is elected by a council, even if there is a successor available.
* The Grand Master of the Order of Malta is elected for life.
* The King of Saudi Arabia is also technically elected. Technically, because of two caveats:
## When the electors (the most senior princes of the House of Saud) vote, the King is generally still alive, and they thus usually elect a ''Crown Prince'', to succeed the current King when he dies. Theoretically, if the King and Crown Prince die within a very short span of time, the princes might have to elect a King, but this has never happened.
## The electors have always elected the most-senior male member of the House of Saud deemed qualified for the job (some princes are ill, uninterested, or otherwise under suspicion, and thus aren't candidates in the first place). Since ''1953'', this has meant, basically, the oldest surviving son of UsefulNotes/AbdulAzizIbnSaud. That's right--it's been over sixty years since the man died, and his grandsons still aren't anywhere near the throne (the Crown Prince and ''de facto'' next in line are both sons of Abdul Aziz, and since Muqrin, the youngest son of Abdul Aziz, was born in 1945, it is unlikely that a grandson would become king before 2020). To give you an idea, Abdul Aziz was born in 1876. [[TheHouseOfWindsor George V]] was born in 1865. There's a very good chance that George V's great-grandson (Charles--who incidentally has been first in line since his mother became Queen in 1952) will get to the throne before Abdul Aziz's eldest eligible grandson.
* The Mongols traditionally elected a Great Khan by and from among the Khans, who were more-or-less lords without landed estates because of the whole "nomad" thing. This is in fact what "Genghis" means-that "Great Khan"'s real name was Temujin.
* UsefulNotes/AngloSaxons were this, sort of. The Witenagemot: "council of wise men" (chief [=VIPs=] of the kingdom basically) chose who the king would be among the royal family. This has been exaggerated by patriotic Englishmen who wanted to emphasize Saxon's democratic virtues; all sorts of criteria could interfere, including the will of the previous monarch and sometimes simply AsskickingEqualsAuthority. Nonetheless it was something of an elective monarchy.
* A variation among various Celtic clans was called "Tanistry" in which the elders elected the ''heir'' to the chiefdom rather then the chief. Among other things, this would make it less likely that an election needed to be held during a SuccessionCrisis: if the old chief was suddenly killed in battle before his clan had time to discuss an impending succession the successor was ready. This custom carried on for a long time and was brought to America by Scots-Irish. It is notable though perhaps coincidental that the election for President of the United States always finishes several months before the previous one leaves office. The last vestige of this tradition may be found in the title of Ireland's deputy prime minister... ''tanaiste''.
** The period when Scotland was switching from this system to the more common primogeniture approach is the scene of [[TheScottishTrope one of Shakespeare's more famous plays]]-the title character of which is visibly shocked when the king names one of his sons as "Prince of Cumberland" (i.e., heir apparent). Following Duncan's murder, he's elected king, due to being a popular war hero who just saved them from a Norwegian invasion.
* The Crown of Aragon. Even though the elected king was almost invariably his predecessor's heir, the electors had little trouble reminding the candidate that they, in theory, could choose anyone, as this quotation from a 14th-century knight shows:
-->[E]ach of us is as much as thou, but [we] all put together are much more than thou.
* The Visigothic Kingdom took this to its logical extreme with a ridiculously powerful noble council that not only had the power to elect kings (with at least one king, Wamba, being elected ''against his will''), but also to depose them almost as they pleased. This made civil wars common, since rival factions often just denounced previous elections as invalid and chose their own king as the real one. Of 37 kings that reigned between the sack of Rome (410) and the death of the last one (721),[[note]]This doesn't count rebels who failed to take control of the capital and are thus not counted in official lists, yet styled themselves as kings.[[/note]] 11 were murdered for sure, three more were deposed but not killed, and quite a handful more died in circumstances that are deemed suspicious.
* The Roman Empire effectively practiced this, the emperors being elected by the will of the Senate, the Army, and the people. Its inability to formalize the matter helped contribute to its fall. The Byzantine/ Eastern Roman Empire managed to make it mostly dynastic, which stabilized it from the situation where anyone could be emperor.
** The Romans did it even when they were ruled by kings, in a rather complicated way: once the reigning king was dead, the Senate would nominate an ''interrex'' (king ad interim) for five days (after which he had to name a successor with the Senate's approval), who would choose a candidate for kingship and present it to the Senate for approval; if the Senate approved, the nominee would be brought before the Curiate Assembly (the assembly of ''all'' Roman citizens, even if only patricians could actually vote), presided by the ''interrex'' for the occasion, for approval; if the Curiate Assembly approved, the nominee became king, but, the king also being the high priest, an augur (a priest tasked with interpreting the will of the gods by observing the flight of birds) would have to give his own approval; ''if'' the augur announced that the gods approved, the king was finally king, but to actually have the power he would have to summon the Curiate Assembly and propose a law in which he was given the ''imperium'' (absolute power), and if the bill passed he would ''finally'' be the king.
*** According to legend, they ''still'' managed to screw this up (first the sixth legendary king Servius Tullius skipped part of the process and, in spite of being a good king, was murdered in the Senate by his son-in-law for this, and then said son-in-law, Tarquinius Superbus, seized the throne but managed to piss off the people and barely escaped Rome with his life), so at one point they took away all power but ''part'' of the religious one, with the annual ceremony ''Regifugum'' (Flight of the King) having the king (now called ''rex sacrorum'', king of sacrifices) interpreting Tarquinius Superbus' part as he was deposed and forced to run for his life to make sure he won't have funny ideas.
* Andorra is an odd example. It is ruled by two co-princes (technically making it a diarchy rather than a monarchy). One of them used to be the King of France but after the French Revolution the position has been held by the President of France, an elected official, though elected by citizens of France rather than Andorra. The other, the Bishop of Urgell (in Spain) is (being a Catholic bishop) ultimately appointed by the Pope (in a complicated process also involving the local archbishop, the Roman Curia, and the Apostolic Nuncio--i.e. Vatican Ambassador--to the country).
* The King of the Belgians nominates his heir, but Parliament must confirm, and may choose another member of the royal family.
* In Kuwait, the Emir appoints with the advice and consent of the National Assembly, a "Crown Prince and Deputy Emir", who is a member of the Al Sabah Clan, but not someone in his immediate family. The last Emir hadn't bothered to appoint anyone else after his successor fell ill--too ill to become Emir--so when he died the Assembly passed him over for another relative.
* The Kingdom of Hawai'i had the king's choice of heir confirmed by a council of nobles and later parliament. When the House of Kamahameha failed, the noble chosen by parliament called for a referendum to confirm it.
* Malaysia:
** Nine out of the thirteen states have hereditary rulers. Every five years, they choose among themselves a Yang di-Pertuan Agong (King), the head of state of the country. In practice, the position rotates among the nine rulers.
** One of the states, Negeri Sembilan [[note]]Coincidentally, the name means "Nine States", as it is traditionally divided into nine chiefdoms[[/note]] is an elective monarchy itself. The ruler is chosen from the princes of the royal family by a council of chiefs.
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