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[[quoteright:350:[[Franchise/{{Batman}} http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/batman_earlyinstallmentweirdness_8700.jpg]]]]
[-[[caption-width-right:350:Is this Batman? [[ThouShaltNotKill Executing someone?]] [[DoesNotLikeGuns WITH A GUN?]][[note]]OK, [[WhatMeasureIsANonHuman so it's a vampire]], but still...[[/note]]]]-]

->''"Oh please, Mandy. That didn't even look like us."''
-->--'''The Grim Reaper''', ''TheGrimAdventuresOfBillyAndMandy'', after a flashback to the pilot short

Long running series often have to experiment a little before they find their niche: sometimes there are concepts abandoned early on that were fascinating, because they were ''potentially'' good ideas back then, or just clash so much with the [[ToneShift later tone of the series]]. In short, the first installment is a 'prototype', like a pilot of a first episode.

If the series is improved for ''abandoning'' these elements, it often leads to a GrowingTheBeard moment. For something similar applied to individual characters, see CharacterizationMarchesOn. A specific sub-trope of this dealing with early installments resembling the real world is EarthDrift. When early characters disappear entirely with no explanations, that's ChuckCunninghamSyndrome (or even DroppedAfterThePilot, if it happens in the very first episode). Might be the result of {{Plot Tumor}}s, ArtEvolution and ContinuityDrift.

There will always be some fans who view the ''current'' incarnation of a series as TheyChangedItNowItSucks.

When this happens to ''themes'' that become popular after the fact because of a work, and are only actually codified elsewhere, it is a subtrope of UnbuiltTrope.

Compare NewFirstComics, LostInImitation, and AdaptationDisplacement. Contrast FirstInstallmentWins. When a character displays this, it's CharacterizationMarchesOn (or {{Flanderization}}, when it essentially happens in reverse). May be the OddballInTheSeries. See also MeetYourEarlyInstallmentWeirdness.

----
!!Examples:

[[index]]
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness/AnimeAndManga
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness/ComicBooks
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness/{{Film}}
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness/LetsPlay
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness/{{Literature}}
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness/LiveActionTV
** EarlyInstallmentWeirdness/GameShows
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness/{{Machinima}}
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness/{{Magazines}}
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness/{{Music}}
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness/NewspaperComics
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness/{{Radio}}
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness/{{Roleplay}}
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness/TabletopGames
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness/{{Toys}}
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness/VideoGames
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness/WebAnimation
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness/WebComics
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness/{{Websites}}
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness/WebVideos
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness/WesternAnimation
[[/index]]

!!Other examples
[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:Advertising]]
* [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K0dyH8ZqYVU The first Chia Pet commercial]] lacks the famous "Ch-ch-ch-chia!"
* Creator/BillyMays had a comparatively more normal voice in his early commercials, as opposed to his trademark [[NoIndoorVoice exuberant delivery]].
* The first Advertising/HeadOn commercial didn't have "[=HeadOn=], apply directly to the forehead." three times. It was actually people discussing the product, ending with "Should I know about [=HeadOn=]?"
* Founder George Zimmer didn't even appear in the earliest Men's Wearhouse commercials, and even then his delivery was much more enthusiastic compared to the deep, gravelly voice he's better known by. [[CatchPhrase I guarantee it.]]
* The original Geico gecko commercials with the Gecko were all about the Gecko (voiced by Kelsey Grammer with an upper-crust accent) complaining about mistaken identity, with hundreds of people calling him when they were looking for an insurance company. Now, the Gecko is a Geico employee and speaks with a more working-class accent.
* You know Capital One's long-running ad campaign with the pillaging Vikings? When that campaign first started they were the ''bad'' guys - instead of Capital One, they represented the "other" guys with their unreasonable rates.
* [[Advertising/{{Vat19}} Vat19's]] earlier ads were more formal and less comedic in tone.
* In what is likely the first "[=McGruff=] the Crime Dog" PSA[[note]]The one that reminds viewers to lock their doors.[[/note]], he sounds more like Jack Keil's[[note]]He provides [=McGruff=]'s voice[[/note]] normal voice, though at some points he sounds more like would in later [=PSAs=]. Additionally, he didn't introduce himself at first, which is justified since he originally didn't have a name until about two years later (according to TheOtherWiki).
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Fan Fic]]
* Dr. Brainstorm's first few appearances in ''Fanfic/CalvinAndHobbesTheSeries'' had him with [[FishEyes unfocused]] gold eyes. He later gets GreenEyes (making him a SignificantGreeneyedRedhead).
** Speaking of ''The Series'', it starts out with rather mundane plots, and Calvin acted a lot more like he was in [[ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes the original strip]] - a hyperactive little kid. Eventually, he became a much calmer GadgeteerGenius (and even later on, TheChessmaster). He ''does'' get a brief CharacterCheck in "Invasion" thanks to LaserGuidedAmnesia, though.
** In Fanfic/TheCalvinverse as a whole, the earlier stories tend to be rather poorly written. It eventually starts improving by the point of ''Fanfic/RetroChill''. Creator/{{Swing123}} considers his [[Fanfic/CalvinAndHobbesTheMovie first]] [[Fanfic/CalvinAndHobbesIILostAtSea two]] stories in the verse to be {{Old Shame}}s, and has rewritten both of them (though he's more or less fine with [[Fanfic/CalvinAndHobbesIIIDoubleTrouble the third installment]]).
* A major example in [[http://kleinerkiller.deviantart.com/gallery/41037509 Yognapped]]: the original installment switched through plot conceits with no concern for the holes it caused, featured laughably one-dimensional villains, and had chapters less than half a page long. The major focus of the series -- [[spoiler: the conflict between the three gods and Lewis's slow descent into moral questionability]] -- didn't come up until halfway through the second installment. Cue [[{{Retcon}} retroactive rewriting]].
* ''[[FanFic/FriendshipIsMagicTheAdventuresOfSpike Friendship Is Magic: The Adventures of Spike]]'': The PreviouslyOn segments at the beginning of each chapter, and the stylized scene breaks, were both dropped at reader command after the first few chapters.
* ''Fanfic/SakiAfterStory'' has this in its first chapter, even though there are only two as of this writing. In the first chapter, mahjong is seemingly treated as a two-player game (Saki and Teru face each other[[note]]This is disregarding how, in canon, as Teru is her team's vanguard while Saki is her team's captain, they would never face each other in the team tournament[[/note]], with Saki winning 112,000 points to Teru's 110,000), and Saki and Nodoka are on a LastNameBasis, as opposed to the FirstNameBasis they adopted in the training camp between the prefecturals and the nationals, at the end of the first anime series.
* Fanfics in general fall into this - as is the case with professional authors. Many fanfic writers' earlier fanfics might not resemble their later fanfics in terms of plot or format. This is understandable as fanfic writers often get tips from reviewers on how to improve, and will often use them.
* Fairly noticeable in FanFic/TheVinylAndOctaviaSeries. The first story in the series is more or less a straight adventure story. Although there is comedy, the story itself is not one, unlike the rest of the series. There's no sexual tension between Vinyl and Octavia, and aside from a few mentionings of shipping, there is no hint that the two have feelings for one another. Finally, this story is around forty-thousand words long and spread out over multiple chapters, unlike the rest of the series, which are all one-shots (with the exception of ''Vinyl and Octavia Have Multiple Dates'', but that's still only two chapters and is in fact shorter than some of the other stories).
* ''FanFic/TheInfiniteLoops'' were codified by Saphroneth but made by Innortal. Thus, Innortal's loops will occasionally do things deemed impossible in later loops, which is usually HandWaved by the fact that they ''were'' the first loops and the restrictions didn't exist yet.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Pinball]]
* ''Pinball/{{Corvette}}'' was Creator/GeorgeGomez's first pinball machine he designed and also the only one to have an upper flipper. Subsequently, he made sure all of his designs had only the two flippers on the bottom and no more.
* The earliest machines from Creator/{{Stern}} had more pronounced PinballScoring, with experienced players scoring into the hundreds of millions of points or even billions, a holdover from Creator/{{SEGA}}'s way of doing things (as Stern began with SEGA Pinball's staff). Over time, scoring on Stern's tables scaled down; with most games in the tens of millions of points for Stern's most recent games. In addition, Stern's earliest machines had loose rules, with modes running all at once and no obvious objective other than to keep playing. It wasn't until ''Pinball/TheSimpsonsPinballParty'' that Stern's games had clearly defined modes and goals.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Stand-up Comedy]]
* Comedian Creator/JeffFoxworthy had several albums' worth of material from the 1980s, none of which were released until after his breakthrough in 1994 with ''You Might Be a Redneck If…'' The 1980s albums show him to be far more vulgar, and somewhat less reliant on his now-trademark Southern humor. Very early on, he didn't even have his famous "If you ''X'', you might be a redneck" one-liners; instead, his original trademark joke was a story that worked in every letter of the alphabet ("A there, dudes! I'm gonna tell you a story you might not B-lieve. 'Cause you C, it's about this friend of mine, he's from D-troit…").
* Creator/LarryTheCableGuy's affected Southern drawl (he's actually from Nebraska) [[VocalEvolution sounded radically different]] on his first major-label album, ''Lord, I Apologize'': it was higher and less raspy than it is now. It was also his only major-label album to feature a "Toddler Mail" segment (a carryover from his independent days), and the only one besides his Christmas album to feature a musical track (the title track, which features Larry singing while Mark Tremonti backs him on guitar).
* Billy Connolly's now-famous swearing rarely extends past the word "jobby" in his early albums. One usage of the F-Word even gets bleeped out! [[/folder]]

[[folder:Real Life — Businesses]]
* Early J. C. Penney stores were far smaller than they are now. They sold only clothes, and were about the size that a dollar store would be today. No salons, bedding, or jewelry, not even the now-defunct auto parts and service, appliances, or sporting goods.
** Going the other way, Sears and many other department store chains used to have all of the aforementioned lines, along with many other now-defunct features such as candy counters and even full restaurants. Nowadays, most department stores focus only on "softlines" such as clothing, bedding, jewelry, and footwear. Outside the "discount" department stores (e.g., UsefulNotes/{{Walmart}}), Sears is the only department store left that still sells "hardlines" like electronics, appliances, and tools (though depending on region and store, some can still sell "small-hardline" goods like countertop kitchen appliances).
* Originally, f.y.e. stores were much larger, like Tower Records or Media Play (both now defunct). Some of them even sold books. Also, they had a [[http://paris1972.files.wordpress.com/2011/01/f1010007.jpg bright yellow logo]]. In 2001, the parent company began phasing out the superstores in favor of rebranding all of its smaller, often mall-based stores (including Record Town, Camelot Music, Strawberries, The Wall, Disc Jockey, and Coconuts) under the f.y.e. banner, at which point the logo was changed to a blue "blob" with "f.y.e." in white letters.
* The first McDonalds stores didn't have seating or drive-thru windows. The most familiar design with the red Mansard roofs didn't come along until the early 1970s, generally staying that way until it was replaced in the late 2000s by the [[FanNickname Giant Eyebrow of]] [[DoomyDoomsOfDoom Doom]]. Very early on, they served hot dogs instead of hamburgers (and, even after the burgers came along, roast-beef sandwiches and fried chicken for a while, too).
* Abercrombie & Fitch was originally a mail-order sporting goods and sportswear store dating back to the late 19th century. After languishing in the 1970s and 1980s under the ownership of sporting goods retailer Oshman's, it was reinvented in the 1990s as a teen clothing store by The Limited, who later spun it off.
* The Gap family of brands went through this entirely. Gap originally sold jeans, brand-name clothing, and albums before becoming a more upscale private-label brand in 1986. Banana Republic originally sold safari clothing before Gap bought it and {{Re Tool}}ed it into a luxury clothing retailer. Sister chain Old Navy was originally far larger and called Gap Warehouse.
* [=Walmart=]:
** Early stores were about one-fourth the size they are now, with no auto repair, pharmacy, jewelry, restaurant, or groceries in sight. For many years, their logo used an old West-style font. There was no Sam's Club, either. And going a step further, early supercenters were called "hypermarts" that were practically entire shopping malls compressed into one store — they even had entire food courts. Only a few hypermarkets were built before the FlawedPrototype was tweaked into the "supercenter" format of today.
** For many years, those that had restaurants almost exclusively had [=McDonald's=] or Radio Grill; they didn't start partnering with Subway until 2007. You might still find the odd one with a [=McDonald's=] still in it, or a one-off with some other fast food chain instead.
** In the 90s Walmart traded on American Patriotism by proudly proclaiming that everything they sold was Made in the USA. When the fact that this was patently untrue became plain and led to lawsuits, they dropped that angle and focused even more on cheaply made overseas products, deciding to focus on how much cheaper their products cost than other stores.
* Originally, most UsefulNotes/{{Kmart}} stores were paired with Kmart Foods supermarkets. This was phased out in the 1970s.
* Early Cracker Barrel stores had gas station/convenience stores, thus making them more akin to Stuckey's. They ditched the gas pumps during the 1970s oil crisis and focused on the restaurant/gift shop hybrid.
* Originally, Kentucky Fried Chicken was not sold at its own restaurants; instead, other restaurants could pay for the franchise rights to sell chicken made with Colonel Sanders's recipe. The first de-facto KFC opened in Utah in the sixties.
* Denny's was originally a doughnut shop called Danny's.
* Many early shopping malls were open-air concourses. They often featured a high number of service tenants (shoe repair, barber shop, etc.), a dime store, a supermarket (sometimes two), a drugstore, and maybe ''one'' department store. Overall, it probably would've had only 30 or 40 stores. One of the first malls to resemble what they look like now was Southdale in Minnesota, although even ''it'' had the aforementioned lineup. Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, the "dumbbell" mall (a huge concourse with a major department store at either end) became the default layout, and particularly in colder northern climates, more malls became enclosed. As malls grew larger, supermarkets and drugstores became less practical tenants (why would you buy groceries at a place with 100 other stores?), while dime stores lost footing to discount stores such as UsefulNotes/{{Kmart}} (which rarely anchored malls except in smaller towns).
* Samsung, best known for electronics like cell phones and televisions, got started selling noodles. It would not move to electronics until 30 years later.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Real Life — Sport]]
* In their earliest form, the modern OlympicGames were a fairly low-key affair. They weren't heavily promoted (since most people couldn't follow them, with even ''radio'' barely existing in 1896) and competitions were open to any amateur athletes who wanted to try their luck at the games--professional athletes were actually discouraged from competing, since they would have had an unfair advantage over the common citizenry (or, more cynically, to restrict the games to "amateurs" rich enough to pay for their own training without endorsements).
** The 1900 and 1904 Olympics, in Paris and St. Louis respectively, were held as appendages to World's Fairs being held in those cities at the same time. They both took place over a series of months and were very low-key affairs. The St. Louis Games attracted very few international athletes, allowing Americans to win most of the medals.
** The Ancient Olympics. They had no female competitors, staff, or audience, they were explicitly pagan in nature, only a few Greek city-states participated in them, and they were performed in the nude. Instead of medals, people got wreaths.
* The first {{FIFA World Cup}} in 1930 was entered by just 13 teams. The first winners, Uruguay, subsequently skipped the next two Tournaments and didn't play again until 1950 (when they won again!)
** As recently as the 1950 tournament, it was common for teams to drop out more or less at the last minute with no possibility of FIFA being able to find a replacement.
** In 1954, the 16 teams were split into four groups of four, as would be the case for the first round at the finals until 1982. But instead of playing all the teams in their group once, there were two seeded teams who played against two unseeded teams.
** In qualifying for the 1950 and 1954 tournaments, the 'Home Nations' of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland (all of Ireland until 1950) were given two finals places between them, whereas Africa and Asia, two entire ''continents'' got just one between them.
* The {{European Championship}} was first held in 1960. Until 1980 when it began to expand, the tournament finals were a relatively brief affair, featuring just four teams and four matches and lasting no more than 5 or 6 days. The small scale nature of this also meant that rather than choosing the hosts years in advance and granting them automatic qualification to the finals, the qualification process was held first, and the host country was picked from the four that had qualified.
** The competition was not called the European Championship until 1968. In 1960 and 1964 it was called the European Nations Cup
** The competition nickname of "Euro (Year)" was not used until 1996.
* Until 1946, the England football[[note]]What the U.S. calls "soccer"[[/note]] team had no manager. The team was instead picked by a 'Selection Committee' chosen by the FA, who would also often send a prestigious English club manager (usually different every time) with the team to offer tactical advice. In 1946, this was made into a permanent position and Walter Winterbottom was appointed the first England manager. However, he still couldn't pick the team; that was left to the committee. In 1962 Winterbottom resigned and the FA offered Ipswich Town manager Alf Ramsey the job. He accepted on the condition that he could pick the team. The FA agreed, originally seeing this as an experiment that could be deemed a failure if Ramsey didn't get results. Ramsey went on to win the World Cup with England in 1966, and the practice stuck.
** Ironically, to this day Ramsey is the only England manager with a better win:game ratio than the Selection Commitee.
* The first playoff defeat for MichaelJordan wasn't to Larry Bird's Celtics or the "Bad Boys" Pistons, but to... the Milwaukee Bucks led by Sidney "Sid the Squid" Moncrief, whom subsequently Jordan [[http://www.nba.com/history/players/moncrief_bio.html praised heavily]].
* Even after the Ultimate Fighting Championship began, becoming the codifier for MixedMartialArts, the sport developed a great deal during the early years. The very first UFC event was a one-man, single elimination tournament, without any gloves or rounds, and almost no rules. As the years went by, many new rules were adopted until the Unified Rules of Mixed Martial Arts were adopted, which became the industry standard.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Real Life — Other]]
* Your life is this, you can now dress, feed, and care for yourself, but back then you depended on your parents for everything. You also think way differently now then you did when you were a child, or even a few years ago.
* Due to the strange path evolution often ends up taking, the evolutionary history of a number of groups can appear like this.
** Vertebrates, which include most of the larger creatures to have existed on the planet, started as small creatures with no jaws. (Jawless fish exist today, but only a few species out of the tens of thousands of modern day vertebrates.)
** The earliest dinosaurs weren't particularly large, starting as medium sized or small two legged creatures.
** Earlier cephalopods had shells, although the transition to modern non-shelled types took place over some time.
** The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cambrian_explosion Cambrian Explosion]] had a number of unusual creatures and forms that aren't found much today.
** After several mass extinctions, the first few creatures to diversify didn't resemble later types of animals that would later become more common.
* As far as ''humanity'' is concerned, the initial peoples did not build their own houses, instead residing in natural caves. They often painted in them. These paintings feature animals no longer around today. Law did not exist either.
* When Mexico declared independence from Spain in 1821, it was intended to be a monarchy with an Emperor. This arrangement lasted less than a year.
* The United States government under the Articles of Confederation, the first national government structure following independence from Great Britain. The US originally had no president or Supreme Court, and national decisions were made by a single-housed Congress. The former colonies, now States, often behaved more like autonomous states, and no national currency existed. The national capital moved around ''a lot''(sometimes multiple times in the course of a year), but was usually in New Jersey, Philadelphia, or New York City, because Washington D.C. was not yet built. It wasn't until the ratification of the Constitution that the US government would be remotely recognizable to a modern American.
* It's common to put up faces and guard bits of yourself when meeting new people, causing any early memories of spending time with your friends or acquaintances before you understand them to be this.
* The 1787 American cents, the first official coins of the United States of America, are a numismatic example of this trope. They lack any of the familiar American icons or mottoes and could easily be mistaken for foreign coins (at least if the faintly-embossed "United States" on the reverse was too worn to make out). They feature a sun and sundial on the obverse and a chain of thirteen rings on the reverse. Laurels and Lady Liberty weren't seen on nationally-circulated coins until 1793. Eagles, stars, and "E pluribus unum" first appeared two years after that.
* Originally, the Statue of Liberty was brown-gold, likely with green splotches. Now it's all green, due to the copper accumulating a thick layer of verdigris.
* This trope also applies to the original World Trade Center (Twin Towers; 04/04/1973 - 09/11/2001) which once stood in Lower Manhattan of New York City. Upon being completed in 1973, the North Tower was equipped with an [[http://www.wired.com/images/article/full/world_trade_center_1970_630px.jpg off-center temporary antenna]] for around 5 years before the [[http://img1.photographersdirect.com/img/26318/wm/pd2357281.jpg more familiar looking 360 ft. antenna]] was erected in 1978.
* Every December (specifically the Monday following the second Wednesday in December) after a U.S. Presidential election, the members of the Electoral College assemble in their respective state capitals to decide who won the election. Or, rather, they met to ''decide'' it once or twice. When the constitution was written, people didn't actually vote for a President; they voted for an Elector, who was expected to exercise his own judgement in actually choosing who to place his vote for. Ever since, however, Electors have all been sworn to support a single candidate each, making the Electoral College a simple layer of abstraction in voting for the President mostly-directly. (Only in a few US states do the ballots even show the name of the elector along with the name of the candidate they're pledged for.) The EC vote is such a formality that many US voters don't even realize it exists, and it's generally forgotten entirely except when a) a candidate gets more popular votes but loses because he didn't get enough electoral votes (most recently in 2000), or b) "faithless electors" vote for someone other than who his/her state's voters picked.
* Similarly, U.S. political party conventions were initially serious affairs where elected delegates chose a candidate according to their own judgement. Now the candidate is determined before the convention with a series of statewide primaries, and the convention is simply a pompous "coronation" ceremony for the winner.
* Picasso's early paintings, [[https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/9c/Gar%C3%A7on_%C3%A0_la_pipe.jpg while quite weird]] [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Old_guitarist_chicago.jpg in their own right]], look little like the cubist work he is remembered for.
* The first three Creator/CirqueDuSoleil shows, including their breakthrough hit ''Theatre/LeCirqueReinvente'', had traditional one-ring circus staging, going through one self-contained segment at a time with little thought to thematic bridges beyond a loose "whimsical-circus-star-for-a-day" conceit expressed mostly in the opening and closing sequences. Starting with their fourth show ''Theatre/NouvelleExperience'', the ring and curtain at the back were eliminated from the staging and the thematic throughlines of each show became much more detailed. Performers were encouraged to create distinctive characters for themselves, and the resultant interactions between the characters helped informed how one act flowed into another, resulting in a far more theatrical approach to the circus format that came to define the company. Aestethically, the early shows also have simpler, less surreal costuming and music than later shows do (musically the Cirque shows evolve significantly with #5, ''Saltimbanco'').
* The SovietUnion's [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Economic_Policy New Economic Policy]], in which small-scale private enterprise was allowed for 7 years in the 1920s.
** Russia had a non-communist, democratic government for eight months in 1917, between the February Revolution (which overthrew the Czar) and the October Revolution (when Lenin and the communists took over). The two revolutions are usually conflated together in the popular imagination.
* The universe directly after the big bang was a super-hot, super-dense miasma of particles, compared to the almost entirely empty cold vacuum it is now. Even the four fundamental forces were all just one "superforce".
* During the first two Space Shuttle missions the external fuel tank was painted white, to match the color scheme of the shuttle and booster rockets. From the third mission on, NASA realized that nobody cared that the fuel tank was a different color, and wanting to save money on fuel (paint is surprisingly ''heavy'', and in spaceflight every kilogram counts) and paint, left the reddish-brown color everyone recognizes.
* The earliest versions of MicrosoftWindows were simply built as a GUI alternative to MS-DOS, with little intention on being as popular as it would turn out. Versions before 95 lacked the iconic taskbar and start menu that would define it many years later. Instead it included the MS-DOS executive (later retooled into the Program Manager), which was a window that included the main programs, and when it was closed the computer would shut down. Finally, the minimize-maximize-close buttons in the top right are entirely missing, replaced with a minus button on the top left that triggers a drop down menu with these types of controls (this button has managed to survive into modern versions, but the menu is now triggered when you click the top right of the menu with no button, probably to prevent DamnYouMuscleMemory).
* The Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade has adopted a great many televised formats since the era of television began. During the 1980s and early '90s, for example, it was known as "The All-American Thanksgiving Day Parade" and was actually ''four'' parades shown more or less simultaneously: the traditional New York City parade; a Hawaiian-themed parade in Honolulu; a Disneyland parade in Anaheim, California; and a parade in Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Starting in the early 1990s, the parade broadcast took on the format it has today: a New York-only affair, and more of a media extravaganza than a parade, with Broadway musical numbers performed in the street in front of the department store and many guest appearances by celebrities (some of which are completely gratuitous). The festivities also once included an ice show performed at the Wollman Rink in Central Park, but that seems to have ended long ago.
* The [[http://www.biblebee.org/ National Bible Bee]], a Scripture memory and knowledge competition, has a big case of this. The way it is now, its defining traits include the Sword Study (an extremely in-depth study on a single, very short book of the Bible), the "Bible Bee box" of materials (including cards with all the passages on them), and a Nationals competition with lots of family-friendly fun. The very first year, 2009, you had to study no less than ''six'' books of the Bible, all of them quite long, on a very non-in-depth level. There was no "Bible Bee box" - it was up to you to print out the cards yourself. And the Nationals competition took place in a hotel better suited for guys on business trips than vacationing families, featuring such wonders as weighted tables with snacks in jars on them that charges you the cost of the product if you pick up anything (and the prices aren't exactly competitive - i.e. eight dollars for gummy bears). There's a lot more than that, though, such as all sorts of format changes and the number of verses (it's been changed around over the years, but the first year the highest age division had to memorize ''1,500'' verses).
* In its first year, the IgNobelPrizes gave out three of its awards to fictitious people they made up JustForPun. Since then, that concept has been dropped; all awards are given out for real events.
[[/folder]]

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