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[[caption-width-right:300:You'd think Franchise/IndianaJones would have seen that trap coming.]]

->"He... ''slimed'' me!"\\
--'''Peter Venkman''', ''Film/{{Ghostbusters}}''

People getting covered in gunge (also known as slime). A variant involves [[CarryingACake a large cake]] and [[RuleOfFunny comedies]]: it is inevitable in such shows that someone will end up with their face in the cake. If the cake is big enough (as many wedding cakes are), they'll do a full-body dive into it.

Often a result of a FoodFight or BucketBoobyTrap. Edible gunge can lead to ITasteDelicious if the person covered in gunge tries to eat his way out.

A trope of the SaturdayMorningKidsShow genre or anything else aimed at kids. This trope is also popular in a number of programs aimed at adults. The game show use of gunge was particularly ubiquitous during the [[TheEighties late 80s]] and [[TheNineties early 90s]], but it seems to have died down now as health and safety and general dignity take increasing hold.

Britain started all this in the 1960s with ''Not Only But Also'' and the festival of anarchy that was ''Series/{{Tiswas}}''. Slightly later on, America got into it as well thanks to the Canadians with the sketch show ''Series/YouCantDoThatOnTelevision''. In general, American game shows tended to use slime as an obstacle or even reward, while the British, with their typical mastery of villainy, treated it more as a sort of ritual punishment with various elaborate and spectacular gungings being dealt out to celebrities or the general public courtesy of Creator/TheBBC.

Check ThePigPen for someone who is always like this. When it's blood that somebody is covered with, it's BloodSplatteredInnocents; if they did it intentionally and like it, it's BloodIsTheNewBlack. If it's mud they're covered in, it's... well... CoveredInMud. An OlderThanTelevision version is PieInTheFace.

Often an essential ingredient in a good HumiliationConga.

Not to be confused with something being [[CoverVersion Covered in]] {{Grunge}}.

----
!!Examples:

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:Game Shows]]
* Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}'s ''[[Series/DoubleDare1986 Double Dare]]'' set the standard for gungy game shows in the US with their branded green slime "Gak." Raised [[UpToEleven up to 11]] when it became ''Super Sloppy Double Dare'' and the show never looked back. ''Double Dare 2000'' introduced "Goooze".
* Other Nickelodeon game shows from the same era that followed suit:
** ''Series/FindersKeepers'', to an extent - mainly if the Pastry Shop was one of the rooms in the house, or if they hid the clue or object in a bucket of slime; otherwise contestants merely got sprayed with or fell into water at most.
** ''Series/ThinkFast''.
** ''[[Series/WhatWouldYouDoNickelodeon What Would You Do?]]'' - Various challenges given to studio audience members, usually involving giant pies. Also hosted by Marc "OCD" Summers.
** ''Series/WildAndCrazyKids'' - featured random teams of kids competing in various games, many of which involved gunge of some sort, especially toward the end of the series.
* Non-Nick shows from the same time period:
** ''Series/FunHouse'', arguably the most successful, both in the US and the UK. Whole lot of fun, Prizes to be won. While gunge is chucked about liberally.
** The most blatant ''Double Dare'' ripoff, ''Slime Time'', and its sister show ''TreasureMall''.
** The first version of ''Pictionary''. The BonusRound that made it to air involved kids simply getting wet in the "Water Works", although clips of the pilot shown on the commercials showed them playing a game with [[PieInTheFace pies]].
** Hanna-Barbera produced one called ''Series/{{Skedaddle}}'', basically a "hot potato"-style game played in an AbsurdlySpaciousSewer. This was the standard penalty for wrong answers, throwing the object out of bounds, running out of time, etc.
* Current Nickelodeon game shows that continue the tradition:
** ''Series/FigureItOut'': Any panelist who triggered the "Secret Slime Action" got to see why that weird pipe was hanging ominously over his or her head. Turned UpToEleven in the current revival, as the slime from the Secret Slime Action can come from ''anywhere'', and clues are often delivered by spraying massive amounts of some kind of related liquid into the panelists' faces. The ''contestant'' can get slimed as well if a panelist guesses the "Word of Honor", the word in the puzzle most critical to guessing the player's secret.
** ''Series/BrainSurge'': Either lose at any point and get sent down the "Brain Drain", a slide filled with "earwax" foam, or win the game and the BonusRound and be subjected to the standard Nick green slime treatment.
* ''Crackerjack!''. In the later era, hosted by Stu Francis, the original finale game of "Double or Drop" was dropped in favour of a new game called "Take A Chance". Here the two celebrities would compete against Stu for extra points for the child contestant by picking a "Joker" colour. Two slats above two booths would appear stating the points available and what the tank above them contained, "The Points to be won, or the penalties to pay". The celeb would sit in one and Stu in the other. One of the assistants would ask a question and the winner received the points for their child contestant. The loser received the contents of the tank above. The ladies (not always) usually got away with it but the male celebrities were always gunged along with Francis, who copped it every week.
* ''Series/NoelsHouseParty'', a UK Saturday evening entertainment show from the 90s, is probably the biggest example of this for shows aimed at adults (as much as you could describe it as 'grown-up' at all). Gunge was a staple of the programme, and it featured throughout its lifetime:
** ''Gunge Tank'': Simply, a clear booth with a seat and a reservoir of gunge on the top. In its first form, on a precursor to ''House Party'' called ''Noel Edmonds' Saturday Roadshow'', a member of the audience would play a word game, with Noel and the celebrity of the week assisting them. The answers to separate clues would combine loosely to form a larger phrase, and the contestant would have to bet on how many of these phrases they could get in 90 seconds - if they failed to reach their number, the gunge was released.
*** The gunge tank was carried over into ''Noel's House Party'', where it would be used to deal justice to a member of the public who had been nominated by their friends for some grudge between them. Later on in the show's life, its use changed to gunging celebrities, who would be put against each other in a phone vote each week to decide who had to go inside. Two foam pumps were also added at the bottom of the tank, which would fill the booth with colored foam around the victim while they were gunged from above.
*** The third style of tank was more conveyor-like, with the victim being carried on a chair through a set of carwash-style brushes to the center before they were covered by the main tank.
*** Finally, the tank was replaced by the Trip Around the Great House, a ghost-train-like ride around the manor-themed studio. The riders (usually a celebrity and an unfortunate audience member) were covered in foam and various other mess at every turn before finally ending up behind the large fireplace, where the main flood of gunge would be spewed from the ceiling.
** ''Number Cruncher'': This was another gunge booth, disguised as a phone box, that would be left on a random street corner each week. Watchers would be shown a picture of where the box was located and then, if they recognized its location, race the country to be the first one inside. Once they had got in, unknown at first to them (although everyone must have realized after the first couple of weeks) the tank would then lock them inside and [[{{Saw}} the only way to escape was to play the game]]. Four numbers would be shown to the contestant via an LCD screen on the tank's phone, after which they had 45 seconds to put them in order by process of trial and error to find the combination to unlock the door and get out before the gunge tank started up. Each button press on the phone would add to the prize money, leading some people to frantically dial in 9s for as long as they dared before attempting to then escape.
*** Later shows turned this into a versus game, with twin booths and two contenders trying to find the combination and gunge the other first.
** ''Panel Beaters'': As if the final iteration of the gunge tank just wasn't severe enough, this game put a team of three celebrities against a panel of three people with unusual occupations, and if they failed to guess their jobs after interrogating them, the celebrity team's entire desk was dragged backwards into a large alcove in the studio wall where they were covered in a positively ludicrous amount of foam and gunge. (If they succeeded, the panel got it instead.)
* ''Series/{{Tiswas}}'': There's an interesting example vis buckets of water. One time, the band Rainbow were in the cage (along with some other people). One of them- Tarrant still refuses to say who- lit up a joint live on national TV. Tarrant threw a bucket of water over him (and the spliff) pretty much immediately.
** The cage itself is an example of beautiful simplicity: It served no purpose except to house the unfortunates condemned to it, who themselves had no role beyond being drenched at regular intervals.
** The same show gave us ''The Phantom Flan-Flinger!'' (*musical sting*), a 'mysterious' masked and caped figure who would leap out of the shadows at random moments and hurl cream pies at presenters, the audience, the cameramen etc...
* ''Run the Risk'' was created in the UK as a sequel of sorts to ''Double Dare'', with the physical challenges usually involving a large knee-deep moat of the stuff. The final part of the show, as the last part of a race where you'd already be quite slippery from other obstacles, was to attempt to climb an inflatable ramp out of the moat while having even more of the stuff poured down on you from the ceiling - naturally this was [[NintendoHard completely bloody impossible]].
* ''Get Your Own Back'' is a show that had kids compete to dunk an authority figure into the "Gunk Dunk", an enormous vat of gunge. One of the most memorable episodes started off as usual only for one of the contestants to reveal their real target... [[LargeHam the show's host]].
** The finale and main attraction of the show went through a number of different forms with games tied to them. In the first series, the 'winning' team (child with the most points and their nominated adult) were both seated poised above a cauldron-like container of watery slime, and had to race to be the first to answer five questions correctly to dunk the other one in. However, if the child ever went in first, they made sure the adult always got it in the end because of the rule that "all children must be accompanied by a grown-up". Hooray.
** The second form had a Halloween-style setting, with the adult of the team still poised above the vat but the child now standing inside a gunge booth to the side. In this game, the adult's objective was still to answer five questions correctly and light five pumpkin lights next to them, but they would instantly lose if they ever answered with a word that began with a certain letter announced at the beginning of the game. The questions were usually deliberately set to lead them into doing this (if the letter was B, for example, a question might be "What is the opposite of 'forwards'?" - the adult avoided this one by answering "Reverse"). If they made a mistake or ran out of time, they were plunged into the vat - if they managed to get five correct within the time then their nominator was gunged instead. The rule above still applied, though, even if it made rather less sense in context.
** The third series used a much lighter 'fairground' setup, and the child's danger of being gunged was removed entirely (it was replaced very briefly by the Forfeit Furnace, in which the host would 'burn' a forfeit that the child had taken with them if they were on the losing team - thankfully this was dropped very quickly after complaints from viewers, though the host reassured in an interview that no possessions were really destroyed). Instead, the losing adult had to answer three multiple choice questions, where answering wrongly would allow their nominator to pull a lever and cover them in one of three colors of gunge. All this was naturally irrelevant, because in the end they always got to send them into the vat below anyway. Again.
** After this, the next few series seemed to settle on a reasonably standard ritualistic format for the Gunk Dunk, an industrial/futuristic set with a chair mounted on a ramp leading down and towards the vat of gunge. The adult was still asked three questions, but this time answering wrongly would, after a rabid call of "Crank 'em up!" from the audience (shown in the page quote), raise them one notch away from the vat ensuring that they would be thrown into it more violently when they were inevitably dunked. For a while, the danger to the child of the team was also reintroduced, with a choice of two levers before the big moment - one of the identical levers would award them an extra prize, the other would release the tank of gunge above their own head.
** The last series of the show completely changed the style of the end game, with both teams now taking part, each adult seated on a ramp, and the kids answering questions to slide them up a level - the one who reached the fifth notch first was then thrown in. The team that had accumulated the most points during the game being given a slight head start, but it didn't really shake the feeling that it made the rest of the games slightly pointless.
* Live And Kicking had the inevitable SaturdayMorningKidsShow gunge tank built into its set in its last series in about 2000. Members of the studio audience were selected as victims, often apparently as a complete surprise to them. The game played varied throughout the series' unusually long lifetime:
** ''The Kid Gets It'': A kid from the audience, usually nominated in secret by a friend, would be called down to sit inside the booth, and had to pick one of the celebrity guests on the show that week to attempt the challenge. The chosen player would have to speak for one minute about themselves (often with prompting from the hosts) without saying a certain "trigger word" that had been shown to everyone else via the low-tech medium of a bit of paper waved around at the audience beforehand. Naturally they always said the forbidden word in the end and the Kid very much Got It.
** The second variant was also called ''The Kid Gets It'', but completely changed the idea to a courtroom-type setup where one contestant would plead the case for gunging one of their friends to a panel of celebrity judges (common crimes included borrowing stuff and not giving it back, or being obsessed with a band the other one couldn't stand). If successful, the friend would be led into the tank and gunged - if not, the nominator would be gunged instead for "wasting the court's time".
** Next, the game changed into ''The Leakiest Sink'', a fairly poor take-off of ''TheWeakestLink'', where two players would have to take turns sitting inside the booth while a celebrity guest pulled one of six plugs apparently attached to it somehow. One of these plugs would start up the gunge tank, so the danger increased as the game went on and the chance of picking the 'right' (wrong?) one got higher.
** ''Stop the Snot'' was the last variant, where the show added a whopping great model nose to the front of the tank. This was similar to the very first game, except a celebrity was quizzed for a minute with the rule that they could never say "Yes" or "No", with results that should be obvious by now should they ever do so.
* Canadian game show Uh Oh!, which is played with teams of two. There were a few mini-games chosen by a wheel. The titular Uh Oh! space challenged the player who landed on it with a question. If the player got it right, the team got points, but getting it wrong results in slime being dumped... on their partner.
** During the final round, there was a category called "Double Uh Oh!" which [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin (as you can guess)]] resulted in double points, or double sliming.
** And then, there was the premium option of "Uh Oh! Deluxe", which was the same. Except it was worth more points, or your partner got ''metallic'' coloured gunge dropped on them.
** Not even the audience was safe in this show. The Punisher would dunk a kid in a kiddie pool, or spray the audience with a water gun during the opening, some games had the contestants tossing slime-filled water balloons at some kind of target or bucket (held by audience members)
** And the last-place team ''always'' got slimed at the end of the show.
* ''Hangar 17'' was a children's magazine-type show that had a couple of sections of this - the first was a talent/variety show section where three acts were judged by a panel of kids while seated underneath giant prop ice cream cones - only the highest scorer was let off. The second section was called ''Teacher on the Hotseat'', where a teacher nominated by some of the audience had to sit inside a futuristic cockpit-like booth and answer three questions on the subject they taught, only being told if they had got the answers right (and therefore escaped) at the end. Only one teacher ever escaped the gunging, which was fairly vicious even by British standards, with the stuff being sprayed from all sides of the device before they were finished off with a torrent from above - when this happened, they let him out and put the girl who had nominated him in instead.
** There was something similar in the Italian show ''"[[{{Disney}} Disney Club]]"'', where the last segment was the [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin aptly-titled]] '''"Teacher torture"'''. If that episode's teacher wasn't able to answer the question... well, [[IncrediblyLamePun do the math]].
* ''Eyespy'', a UK show from the 80s, featured gunge cubicles as part of its final obstacle course round. After answering a question correctly to be allowed to start, contestants would have to find pieces of a code by picking from a row of ten cubicles, only finding out if they had picked one of the four safe ones once they had shut themselves inside.
* ''Clockwise'' was another children's show where the contestants risked their cleanliness - it often featured games in which one member of a team would have to save the other. Two memorable examples were the "steady hand" game where one team member would have to guide a loop along a twisted wire, with the addition that the buzzer was also wired up to a gunge tank with their team-mate inside, and a similar one where the teams had to shoot six targets with catapult-like contraptions before time expired. The final round was called the Tunnel of Time, where the winning team would ride a roller coaster car-like thing through a tunnel, having to answer questions while being covered by various devices throughout.
* ''Pump It Up'', another UK game show, used gunge as its entire scoring system - winning any of the games before the final would allow a team to turn off one of the "gunge zones" on the giant inflatable obstacle course at the end. If a zone wasn't turned off when a team reached it, a load of gunge would be spewed down on to them from the ceiling, making progress difficult at best, and if it happened to be on an uphill ramp, hilariously impossible.
* The British loved this, didn't they? ''Twister'' was a game show in 2001 that wasn't often messy, but occasionally had games that involved contestants being fastened in place under [[UpToEleven huge industrial hoppers]] and being covered in ''ridiculous'' amounts of gunge throughout. One of them was set up so that their team-mates had to avoid hitting "triggers" on the floor - [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kSdbE5uxINs#t=3m the resultant carnage can be viewed here]].
* Beginning in Season 3, ''[[Series/{{Wipeout2008}} Wipeout]]'' began using more gunge in its obstacles, the most prominent examples in the qualification course being the "paint sprayer" Sucker Punch (which added [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin exactly that]] to its usual content of boxing gloves on sticks), and [[IHaveManyNames one that is usually a kitchen-based setting but has a different theme every time]] in season 4.
* On the Israeli game show ''Crime and Punishment'', participants who made it to the final stage (after beating two others, so it was one finalist per episode) had to sit on a chair above a huge tank of slime while connected to a polygraph. They were told to answer five embarrassing questions truthfully: if they did, they’d get all the money they’d earned (usually around 2,000 NIS); if they failed, they’d fall into the slime and get nothing.
* ''Series/DickAndDomInDaBungalow'' lived for gunge; all the contestants tended to get mushy peas, tomatoes, rice pudding, and other substances including the sinister Dirty Norris thrown over them during the show, and then the loser would have to [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4M_hd85jZ8M&t=0m07s sit under a gunge tank]] for good measure. Possibly the only show to buy custard powder by the tonne.
** ''Series/TheLegendOfDickAndDom'', their follow-up show, has lots of gunge-covered {{Shout Out}}s to Da Bungalow, like the heroes being put in the stocks and having tomatoes flung at them.
* ''Series/ImACelebrityGetMeOutOfHere'' gets celebrities to stick their faces into tanks of slime, get it poured over them or swim in it. Oh, and often there's worms and insects. All this to win food for themselves and their competitors.
* A recent Canadian talent show on YTV, ''Zoink'd!'', is pretty much what ''AmericasGotTalent'' (though, it plays more like ''TheGongShow'') would be like if it were judged by kids, and pressing their button dropped something on the performers, which progressed up to gunge of course.
* [[Series/{{Whammy}} Whammy! The All-New Press Your Luck]] had this in the form of the "Double {{Whammy}}," where, in addition to losing all your current winnings, you also got covered in gunge related to the Whammy Animation shown.
* ''Series/AtMidnight'': After having featured a clip involving [[http://kotaku.com/kimchi-slap-looks-incredibly-painful-and-gross-1608828090 kimchi being thrown at a character]] in the opening round, the winner also got kimchi thrown at them.
[[/folder]]

[[folder: Anime & Manga]]
* A ghoul splatters the students with what seems to be its body fluids in episode 8 of ''Manga/BlueExorcist''...
** Also the running gag with Suguro, Miwa and Shima in TheMovie.
* In the sci-fi {{hentai}} ''Alien from the Darkness'', the crew of a derelict ship are all found dead, with the women stripped naked and covered from head to toe in a thick, green, gooey substance. This is later revealed to be a byproduct of the titular alien's (nearly always fatal) [[MarsNeedsWomen mating technique]].
* A rare [[Funny/GhostInTheShellStandAloneComplex Crowning Moment of Funny]] happens on, of all people, ''The Major'' in episode 14 of ''GhostInTheShellStandAloneComplex''. She gets surprised by an android, who grabs her and punches her clean out of a window. An android herself, she isn't really hurt. However...she ended up in the middle of a heap of wet, smelly trash. ''She'' didn't find it funny at all.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Comic Books]]
* In ''ComicBook/SpiderMen'', Peter's webs are rendered pretty realistically, so that when he web-yanks Mysterio by the face, it's covered in gooey little driblets of web.
* The protagonists of ''Literature/MaxAndMoritz'' (1865) by Creator/WilhelmBusch break into a bakery, fall into a trough of dough and emerge completely covered in dough.
-->''All enveloped now in dough,\\
See them, monuments of woe.''
* Subverted for laughs in ''Comicbook/TheLifeAndTimesOfScroogeMcDuck'' when Sam Steele is thrown into a puddle of extremely thick mud by an annoyed Scrooge. Upon rising to his feet again, [[DirtForcefield all the mud simply slides off him and leaves him spotless]] -- As he explains immediately afterwards, [[TheAce a superintendent of the North-Western Mounted Police]] does not get... 'Muddy'.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Fan Fic]]
* Examples of Fanfic/{{the Calvinverse}}:
** The Teacher Creature does this to people in ''Fanfic/AttackOfTheTeacherCreature''.
--> '''Sherman:''' This reminds of the {{food fight}}s at the university.
** This happens in ''Fanfic/CalvinAndHobbesTheSeries'' when Calvin uses the [[TimeStandsStill Time Pauser]] to dump the gooey school lunches on every kid's head.
* One of the stipulation matches featured in ''A Ring Of Their Own'' is called "Slime Time", where the winner gets to dump a bucket of "slime" (in reality, pancake batter with green food coloring) over the loser's head.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Film]]
* ''Film/{{Carrie}}'': "They're all gonna laugh at you."
* ''Film/{{Ghostbusters}}'':
** "....he ''slimed'' me."
** It happens after Stay Puft explodes... Bill Murray's character actually stays completely dry at that point -- he'd got it earlier and it was felt not fair to do it to him twice. There is the fact that he was the male lead, and would be kissing the girl soon. Not very romantic kissing a man with as much marshmallow as the other Ghostbusters had on them.
** In the sequel, after being hosed with the 'good vibrations' pink spooge, "Vy am I drippings vith goo?"
** Regularly invoked in ''TheRealGhostbusters''.
* In ''TheGreatRace'', due to a ''Prisoner Of Zenda''-like case of assumed identity, all of the main characters end up in a bakery throwing pies at each other. Throughout, the Great Leslie remains completely immaculate until the ActionGirl feminist, blinded by the pie on her face, is spinning around with a pie in her hand and Leslie ducks a little too late.
* In ''Film/BlazingSaddles'', the big fight scene at the end spills out of its set into another soundstage, then spreads into the studio commissary and escalates into a food fight. Hedley tries to evade it by ducking into a restroom, then emerges a second later with a faceful of pie.
* In the film version of ''{{Film/Godspell}}'', Robin (as the Rich Man in "Lazarus and the Rich Man") is sent to Hades and tormented by demons who present her with scrummy looking strawberry-and-cream pies -- which they then drizzle ketchup on. And then pie her with.
* The Lost Boys of ''Film/{{Hook}}'' are fond of this -- Peter, when he first tries to fly, lands in a vat of gunge; some of their weapons are designed to leave pirates covered too; and there's a FoodFight.
* In ''Film/StarshipTroopers 3'', cute BridgeBunny Holly Little gets alien bug-goo splashed across her, prior to a giant penile-claw erupting from the ground between her splayed legs and almost being devoured by a ginormous VaginaDentata with [[AGodAmI delusions of grandeur]].
* ''Film/MenInBlack'': The troopers at the beginning, J after getting puked on by the squidbaby, K after [[spoiler: blasting his way out of [[JustEatHim Edgar's stomach]]]], and finally ''both'' of them after [[spoiler:L pops Edgar like a zit with J's weapon.]] In every occasion the gungee has to spit out some gunge before they can talk about how gross the experience was.
* In ''Film/SinginInTheRain'', grunge-covered stuntman Don Lockwood meets the Friendly Corporate Executive.
* In ''The Incredible Shrinking Woman'', [[IncredibleShrinkingMan the increasingly tiny]] housewife Pat falls into a garbage disposal. It gets worse when the maid, who is oblivious to the situation because she's listening to a radio very loudly, starts scraping off the plates into the disposal,
* In ''WesternAnimation/MonstersUniversity'', the Oozma Kappas are pranked by the other fraternities. They cover them in different pastel colored slime, glitter, flowers, and stuffed animals. The resulting picture looks like they are cutesy trolls from a little girl's cartoon.

[[/folder]]

[[folder:Literature]]
* At the climax of Creator/DanielPinkwater's ''Young Adult Novel'', the Wild Dada Ducks are assaulted in the Himmler High lunchroom by the other students with one thousand portions of extra soggy Grape-Nuts cereal.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Live Action TV]]
* In ''Series/HappyEndings'', the episode "The Marry Prankster" Max dumps slime on Penny twice during his prank revenge-the first was on purpose, the second time she gets slime that was meant for Dave.
* In ''The AdrianMole'' Diaries, the adult Adrian is invited onto what he thinks is a straightforward chat show to talk about his cookery book. As he begins talking about ''Cooking With Offal'', a tank overhead opens and deluges him with unexpected, and humiliating, gunge.
* ''Series/WizardsOfWaverlyPlace'' has Alex get covered in chocolate.
* ''YouCantDoThatOnTelevision'' had the habit of dousing the kids with water whenever they said the word, with green slime whenever they said "I don't know" (check the picture). Other colors of slime were used occasionally, for example a blue sliming once when they "ran out" of green slime. Red slimings for saying "free" on an episode that had been "taken over" by the Russians.
** The show was a big hit when it aired on {{Nickelodeon}}, which adopted the slime part into... well, everything. Especially in TheNineties. To this day, various in-studio shows and events take joy in dumping green stuff on people.
* ''Series/ICarly'': Nevel, with "guacamole" that resembles good ol' {{Nickelodeon}} green slime.
* An episode of ''Series/FawltyTowers'' has Basil taking revenge on a man who he believed to have been a hotel inspector throughout the episode by hitting him with custard pies and pouring cream into his briefcase.
* ''Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers'' did this to [[ThoseTwoGuys Bulk and Skull]] REPEATEDLY. Cakes, usually, but just about anything could land on those two to end an episode...
** Bulk seems to have returned to his role as gunge magnet in ''Series/PowerRangersSamurai''.
* In an episode of ''{{Cheers}}'', the gang get into a FoodFight, and as we're going to actually get to see Norm's wife Vera -- who has remained unseen throughout the show -- she gets hit in the face with a bowl of mashed potatoes!
* The "Nickelodeon Kids Choice Awards" has this done to extreme lengths -- most of the time it happens to celebrity guests, as part of the big stunt near the end, and to a surprise celebrity guest such as Creator/JimCarrey, Creator/JohnnyDepp or Creator/RobinWilliams.
* ''Series/DoctorWho'':
** "The Sontaran Stratagem": Naked evil clone of Martha.
** Happens a lot in general to people fighting the [[Series/DoctorWho Slitheen]] [[spoiler: or [[Series/TheSarahJaneAdventures Slitheen-Blathereen]]]]. One splash of [[WeaksauceWeakness vinegar]] and ''pop''.
** On Amy Pond's first outing with the Doctor, she winds up in this state when [[spoiler: the Star Whale, on the verge of swallowing them, is forced to vomit.]] Or, as the Doctor put it:
-->"Nothing broken, there's no sign of concussion... and yes, you ''are'' covered in sick."
* This became something of a running joke in ''Series/TheSarahJaneAdventures'' with Clyde ''always'' seeming to get Raxacoricofalapatorian gunge all over him. Or any other kind of gunge, actually.
* ''Series/ThirtyRock'' subverted this in one episode where [[TinaFey Liz Lemon]]'s old classmates [[spoiler: planned to "Carrie" her at their school reunion. They were convinced not to by Jack Donaghy]]
* More or less the entire Idea behind the Discovery Kids show ''{{Grossology}}''.
* ''Series/AllThat'', being a {{Nickelodeon}} comedy, embraced this repeatedly, but particularly memorable was a combined {{lampshade}}/ [[SubvertedTrope double subversion]]: A baker has sent the cast a roomful of cream pies, far more than they could possibly eat, in appreciation of the show. Several cast members ask pointedly what to do with the excess pies, when their ButtMonkey stage manager walks in. Someone decides to bring the extra pies to the zoo for the zebras. Stage manager calls them on it, and one explains that the baker had also sent over a large cake explicitly for throwing at him.
* The "Helping Hands" game on ''Series/WhoseLineIsItAnyway'' (player A is the straight player; player B (Ryan) has his arms behind his back and player C (Colin) substitutes his own arms for Player B) would often ends with Ryan covered in whatever foodstuffs were being used as props, usually as a result of Colin's blind attempts to feed him.
** A special mention for whoever decided [[http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=klm7VgQnrFA to give them champagne.]]
** What of the time Colin is holding a cream pie Ryan is dressed as a clown and Drew [[PieInTheFace slams the pie in Ryan's face during the game.]]
* Jim Cramer of ''Mad Money'' throws banana cream pies at company [=CEOs=]. [[Series/TheDailyShow Or so I heard]].
* This tended to happen to people a lot on ''Series/MaidMarianAndHerMerryMen''.
* In ''DirtyJobs'' Mike Rowe, in the course of doing the job, usually gets filthy by the end of it. Sometimes the filth is wet. Are the fangirls pleased by this? Yes they are.
* ''Series/RedDwarf'': "His head burst..." Lister got sick with a mutated form of some illness which made his head giant... and it burst. He was relieved and felt much better, but his poor crew mate saw that happen and got Covered in Gunge.
* In an episode of ''Series/HannahMontana'' after representing Lily in teen court (and proving to everyone's satisfaction that she was to blame for Lily's current predicament), Miley gets "served" some justice, and ends up covered in pasta and sauce.
* ''Film/TheDayOfTheTriffids'' (2009). The bodies of those killed by the {{Man Eating Plant}}s are covered in triffid venom.
* Late Night with Jimmy Fallon has [[{{Exactlywhatitsaysonthetin}} Models and Buckets]]. It's basically a Nickelodeon show with Models and Buckets. Occasionally leads to ITasteDelicious.
* ''Series/DickAndDomInDaBungalow'' lived for gunge; all the contestants tended to get mushy peas, tomatoes, rice pudding, and other substances including the sinister Dirty Norris thrown over them during the show, and then the loser would have to [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4M_hd85jZ8M&t=0m07s sit under a gunge tank]] for good measure. Possibly the only show to buy custard powder by the tonne.
** Plenty of {{ShoutOut}}s to this in ''Series/TheLegendOfDickAndDom'', too: whenever the leads can be made to fall into the mud or fight in a tub of custard, they are.
* ''Series/{{Angel}}'' did this a few times, covering several characters in demon slime. And Angel's car keys in one ep.
-->'''Cordy to Doyle:''' "Do you think that tentacle spew comes out with dry cleaning?"
* ''Series/ThirtyRock'' - Jenna is at a 'Kid's Choice' awards show, where Best Actress winner Helen Mirren (or at least someone playing her) gets slimed at the podium. She chuckles "Ohh, you got me!"
* In a Creator/MontyPython sketch at an Army Recruiting office, an applicant (Eric Idle) protests that he hasn't gotten any funny lines - the recruiting officer (Graham Chapman) offers to start a new sketch to let him be funny - where the officer becomes a fast-talking music hall burlesque comic who gets all the funny lines again. The sketch further degenerates into a circus setting where the officer is a clown, dumping water on Idle, dropping a large fish down his trousers, upending a bucket of whitewash on him, and shoving a pie into his face, all the time telling him "It's your laugh, mate, not mine!"
* ''Series/ImACelebrityGetMeOutOfHere'' is mostly made of opportunities to do this to celebrities.
* In the ''Series/{{Frasier}}'' episode "Are you being served?" Niles is in the restroom when Martin's Hot&Foamy shaving lather heater explodes. He comes out covered from head to toe and says "I'm all right, just a little hot. And foamy."
* In the ''Series/ModernFamily'' episode "Snip", Claire goes to Luke's school to drop off his science project, which he'd left at home. Unbeknownst to her, he'd rigged his locker to shoot yogurt in order to get back at a classmate who'd been breaking into it. She manages both to embarrass Luke and ruin her shirt.
* ''Series/TheXFiles'': In "Squeeze", Tooms is a monster who produces some kind of yellow slime, which Scully thinks is bile. Mulder actually regretted that his favourite investigative method is FingertipDrugAnalysis. Scully gets slimed a bit when Tooms attacks her.
* Happens all the time in ''Series/HorribleHistories,'' as in the [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eV39vKc50hI Stupid Death]] of Richard the Raker. The gunge is usually meant to be poo.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Pinball]]
* The backglass for ''Pinball/{{Comet}}'' shows several of the rollercoaster riders Covered In Gunge, such as an old woman getting a facefull of ice cream and a man being plastered by the flowing hair of the woman ahead of him.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Sports]]
* A recent tradition in Major League Baseball is to give a shaving(or whipped-)cream pie-in-the-face to someone who made a walk-off hit while they are being interviewed after the game.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Theatre]]
* Traditional British {{pantomime}}s often feature a slosh scene at the end of the first act, in which two or more comic relief characters start a completely innocent activity such as baking a cake or putting up wallpaper, and inevitably end up covered in whatever messy stuff they're using.
* ''{{USLES}}'' pantomimes, while done on shoestring budgets, still include slosh scenes, although water, talcum powder and shaving foam tend to be substituted for gunge, being both cheap and easy to clean up. Often leads to characters [[LampshadeHanging lampshading]] the inevitable mess with lines like, "Better put down this handy tarpaulin just to be on the safe side!"
* Creator/MartinMcDonagh is fond of getting messy: he's got raw eggs to the head in ''The Cripple Of Inishmaan'', bone chips/dust in ''A Skull in Connemara'', torture with hot oil in ''The Beauty Queen of Leenane'', and {{Gorn}} that drenches the [[BloodSplatteredInnocents innocent]] and [[BloodIsTheNewBlack not-so-innocent]] alike in ''TheLieutenantOfInishmore''. It's like he does it ''just'' to torment the [[CleanupCrew stage management]] team!
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Video Games]]
* A powerup like this will appear in ''BackyardSports: Sandlot Sluggers''.
* An item called Sticky Juice in ''WaterWarfare'' will fill your water gun up with, well, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin sticky juice,]] which will temporarily cover an enemy in yellow goo that slows them down (and changes your water's splashing animation and sound effects to huge, gloppy splats). The instruction manual calls this StandardStatusEffect "soaked," but ''we'' know better.
* This is your entire ''means of combat'' in the obscure platformer ''SPRay: Spirited Prince Ray.''
* In the PS3 game ''VideoGame/{{Folklore}} there are certain enemies, such as Impets, that can immobilize the player this way.
* Can you say ''VideoGame/{{Portal 2}}''? Three varieties of colored gel involved in numerous puzzles... Unless a player is really careful, they're bound to get covered in the stuff at some point.
** Which is [[ToxicPhlebotinum something of a worry]] given this recorded announcement:
--->'''Cave Johnson:''' Oh, in case you get covered in that repulsion gel, here's some advice the lab boys gave me: ''do not get covered in the repulsion gel.'' We haven't entirely nailed down what element it is yet, but I'll tell you this: it's a ''lively'' one, and it does ''not'' like the human skeleton. [[spoiler:Don't worry. It's actually safe enough. ''And'' it washes off.]]
* ''GhostbustersTheVideoGame'' follows up from the original films...and this time Venkman ''does'' get that second helping. But you and him get even; he coaches you in catching Slimer. From here out, you're discouraged from getting coated, as it's usually a charging ghost, toxic Black Slime, or giant marshmallows being hurled by Stay Puft. All of them hurt.
** On the other hand, the game gives you an Achievement for getting slimed. It's kind of a rite of passage for that job, one assumes.
* In the [[VideoGame/TombRaider2013 2013 reboot]] of Franchise/TombRaider, Lara spends a ''lot'' of time covered in mud, blood (much of it her own) and general filth.
* Redwood Games put out two educational platforming titles, ''Word Rescue'' and ''Math Rescue'' where this trope would be used in lieu of dispatching enemy Gruzzles with violent weaponry. The player character would simply point at the Gruzzle and Benny Bookworm/Butterfly would instantly drop a bucket of pink slime on them. ''Math Rescue'' justified this trope by explaining the slime was stink mud, and the Gruzzles slimed by it would teleport to their spaceships to take baths and not return.
* All the characters in ''VideoGame/{{Splatoon}}'' are armed with ink-based weaponry. Splattering is a core part of the gameplay.
* In ''VideoGame/SuperMarioSunshine'', Mario can get completely covered in the various types/colors of sludge he needs to clean up if you slide around in it long enough. A simple spin jump or diving in some water will remove it immediately.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Webcomics]]
* This is a RunningGag in ''DominicDeegan'', though it hasn't been seen as much as of late. Whenever Dejah, a living Slime, uses his "Slime Geyser" teleport spell, one of the teleported always, ''always'', gets covered in slime. It's always, ''always'' Luna (and she always, ''always'' has an exasperated look on her face when it happens).
** [[http://www.dominic-deegan.com/view.php?date=2012-10-03 Well, almost always...]]
* [[http://sorethumbs.keenspot.com/d/20071005.html Ugghhh...]] [[SoreThumbs Too many chocolates.]]
* Lloyd and Radic from Webcomic/MurphysLaw get covered in GiantSpider innards.
* [[http://ysdtic.com You Shouldn't Do That In Comics]]. Written/"drawn" by a WAM fetishist, and inspired by "You Can't Do That on Television"
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Web Original]]
* ''Literature/IndustrialZone'' at [[http://www.furaffinity.net/user/iron-k FurAffinity]] is a fictional game show series featuring this in vast quantities. Experience the uncomfortable feeling of not knowing whether you're reading porn or not.
* From ''TheOnion'': [[http://www.theonion.com/articles/exnickelodeon-stars-relate-horrors-of-green-slime,1174/ "Ex-Nickelodeon Stars Relate Horrors Of Green Slime Syndrome"]].
* WhateleyUniverse: In "Boston Brawl" Phase (the prissy rich kid) ends up dumped in the Boston sewers. 'Slimed' doesn't begin to describe it. It takes a lot of work to get her cleaned up enough that she can ride home with everyone else.
* There are lots of Internet gameshows using this as a prize or forfeit.
* In ''Literature/{{Worm}}'', [[http://parahumans.wordpress.com/2011/06/11/1-1/ Chapter 1.1]], the three bullies dump juice and soda all over Taylor when they find her hiding in a bathroom stall.
* It seems like half of the polls on Mister Poll consist of this (you can probably chalk it up under "Weird Fetishes").
* In {{WebAnimation/TOME}}, Doubling and Splats' attacks are slime based.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Western Animation]]
* Almost every episode of ''WorldOfQuest'' features the Prince being covered in something. Usually three or more times.
* [[TheSimpsons "Mmmm. Free goo."]]
** In "Brother from the Same Planet", Homer tries to make it up to Bart (for forgetting to pick him up after soccer practice) by offering him a hot-fudge sundae, but he accidentally spills it over his head.
* ''{{Metalocalypse}}'' -- already upset at believing he's not getting the respect his bandmates get, Toki is slimed while getting a kids-choice award, turning him dark and angry, especially toward kids.
* ''RobotChicken'' had this as the end of the first season and opening of the second, in a ShoutOut to YouCantDoThatOnTelevision. (Same set, same trigger words)
* Dexter in ''WesternAnimation/DextersLaboratory'' wound up repeatedly covered in mud, pies, whipped cream, etc. while competing against Dee Dee on a game show. Somehow his NerdGlasses always remained clear so he could [[ExpressiveMask register his displeasure]].
* In an episode of WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries, Harley Quinn bakes a gigantic cream pie for the Joker...and lies in it waiting for him.
* ''FanboyAndChumChum'' characters are prone to this, but especially Fanboy. He has been sneezed on, covered with Frosty Freezy Freeze, gotten a PieInTheFace several times, been assaulted with eggs, had the school cafeteria food all over him and once his costume got so dirty it actually ''came to life''.
** The episode "Slime Day" is all about the eponymous duo trying to get covered in slime by saying the secret phrase before the day is over, but they're too stupid to figure out what the secret phrase is.
* In the ''GeneratorRex'' episode "Breach", when Rex started destroying everything around him to cause Breach to create portals so that he could try to escape, all while Breach is throwing out the junk into different parts of the world, a portal appeared right over some Evo scorpions that Six and Bobo were fighting, dropping some junk and squishing the bugs. What came next was white goop (ice cream) covering both Six and Bobo. Bobo comments, "I'm not complaining."
* ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'':
** In the first episode, Sokka is instantly established as the local ButtMonkey when he gets covered in flying bison snot.
*** Which closely resembles good ol' green slime (it ''is'' a {{Nickelodeon}} program, after all).
** [[TruthInTelevision Tunnel boring machines]] often mix the excavated soil with water to ease removal. No prizes for guessing where two thirds of Ozai's Angels and three fourth of the Gaang end up at the end of the episode "The Drill."
** ...Neither of which compare to what was waiting for [[spoiler:Aang and Zuko in the TempleOfDoom]] in "The Firebending Masters."
* In a ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'' episode where he tried to bring Hank and Dean back from the dead, resident wizard Dr. Orpheus ends up covered in ectoplasm.
* In the ''[[WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic]]'' episode "Baby Cakes", Pinkie Pie gets covered in soppy dough after getting sprayed with bathwater and then dumping a bag of flour on herself to amuse a pair of baby twins.
* [[WesternAnimation/DannyPhantom Tucker]] was a victim when ghost hunters attacked him when he was dressing up as a ghost. We earn this gem:
--> '''Tucker''': *Covered in ectoplasm* I'm not gonna grow a third arm, am I?
** And a few seconds before we get this one:
--> '''Sam''': In retrospect, maybe dressing like a ghost in a parking lot full of ghost hunters wasn't a great idea.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Music]]
* The woman on the [[http://www.amiright.com/album-covers/images/album-Herb-Alpert--The-Tijuana-Brass-Whipped-Cream--Other-Delights-40th-Anniversary-Edition.jpg cover]] of Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass' ''Whipped Cream & Other Delights'' was clad in a whipped cream "dress" and what appeared to be absolutely nothing else.
** For the "Re-whipped" version of the album, the girl on the cover is wearing a whipped cream "bikini".
* Similarly, the model on the cover of the Ohio Players' album ''Honey'' is clad in only honey while suggestively feeding herself the same confection.
* Comedian Pat Cooper is covered with spaghetti sauce and noodles on the cover of his ''Spaghetti Sauce and Other Delights''. It's only one of the myriad lampoons of, and homages to, the ''Whipped Cream'' album.
* This happens to AvrilLavigne in the video for "He Wasn't"
* JessieJ does this to herself in the video for "Who's Laughing Now"
* Bonus points go to raves where the entire point is to have paint sprayed at the audience. Talking to you, ''Life in Color'', or [[ArtifactTitle Dayglow]] as it was once known.
[[/folder]]

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