Some games offer you the option to buy a house. This may act as a free [[TraumaInn Inn]], give you a place to store stuff, or just be a BraggingRightsReward. It rarely has a major impact on the gameplay (but may be a big pull for certain types of players, depending on the level of AnInteriorDesignerIsYou).

Compare HubLevel.
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!!Examples:

* In ''[[VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl Pokémon Platinum]]'', a random person gives you a Villa in the Resort Area for free. Other powerful trainers will visit you there, but it's really just something to spend your cash on.
* Most of the ''VideoGame/{{Aveyond}}'' games feature the TraumaInn–type house. They also allow you to speak to your teammates.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'' has one which serves as a free inn, but as there's already one of those aboard the Highwind, [[BraggingRightsReward it's really just for the bragging rights.]]
* ''{{Terranigma}}'' allows you to buy an apartment if you max out a certain city's development. You can even buy furnishings, a bed for resting and a save point to put in it!
* In the ''VideoGame/{{Fable}}'' series, the primary means of earning money is [[AnEntrepreneurIsYou house-flipping or renting out properties]]. [[AnInteriorDecoratorIsYou Buying better furniture]] for your properties increases the homes' values and the occupants' standard of living, subsequently increasing the amount they pay you in rent.
* ''VideoGame/TheSims'', of course, but you're pretty much required to have a house.
* You're required to buy a house in ''AnimalCrossing''... and you spend most of the game expanding it and paying off your debt.
* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' games let you buy various houses (''technically'' not in unmodded ''Morrowind'', but building a stronghold involves financial transactions). Their usefulness varies - in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' you get free stuff when you build a stronghold, but [[AnInteriorDesignerIsYou you have to buy the furnishings]] for your houses in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]''
** The whole point of the ''Hearthfire'' DLC from Skyrim is to allow you to build and furnish a special home for your Dragonborn.
* You can purchase a [=NeoHome=] in ''{{Neopets}}'', and [[AnInteriorDesignerIsYou decorate it to your heart's content]].
* ''BaldursGate II'' had "stronghold quests" for each PC class, with rewards ranging from a castle for Fighters and the Planar Sphere for Mages to a bunk in TheOrder of the Radiant Heart HQ for [[ThePaladin paladins]].
* ''Franchise/DragonAge'':
** In ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins'', if you cleaned the {{DLC}}-only location Soldier's Peak of Darkspawn infestation, it would serve as your nominal home. You couldn't actually live there, but it had two local merchants and, more importantly, the only container usable for storing your own items in the entire game.
** In ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOriginsAwakening'' expansion, you get Vigil's Keep as your home: it lets you [[ArbitraryHeadcountLimit swap party members in and out]] like the Party Camp did in ''Origins'' and has a storage container like Soldier's Peak.
** In ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'', you get two houses: In Act I, you and your family are living with your uncle in his small home in Lowtown. There is a storage chest there, and you can always find your mother, uncle, brother/ sister, and possibly dog there to converse with them, and can read letters sent to you, mostly to start sidequests. By Act II, you've moved up in the world, and purchased the old family manor in Hightown. It has all the same features as Gamlen's shack, except its bigger, Gamlen doesn't live there, you can potentially ask your Love Interest to move in with you, and [[spoiler: your sibling can no longer be found there.]]
* In ''VideoGame/{{Earthbound}}'' you can eventually afford to buy a small house just west of your hometown. The [[ShadyRealEstateAgent guy you buy it from]] neglects to mention that it's ''[[spoiler:missing a wall]]'', but it contains a [[OneHundredPercentCompletion photo location]] and a [[CrackFic silly magazine excerpt]] so it's totally worth it.
* You start out in a modest cave in ''{{Elona}}'' and eventually have the option of buying bigger and better real estate.
* In ''PhantasyStarII'', your home is where new party members come to call and where you can [[ArbitraryHeadcountLimit swap them out]].
** In ''PhantasyStarIV'', you can stay at your home in Aiedo for free instead of staying at an inn-- it becomes a bit of a TearJerker when you return to it after Alys is killed, and all her things are still there. You can also display the ridiculous souvenir crap you can buy at a tourist trap in the first half of the game.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' the Lone Wanderer can get one of two homes depending on the outcome of the "Power of the Atom" quest. The player can buy several preset decoration schemes for either dwelling and store other useful, valuable, or decorative items there. Both contain [[TraumaInn beds]] and can be stocked with additional useful furniture.
** ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' has several house options for the PC, but the most developed of these is the Presidential Suite from the Lucky 38 casino, which you get for merely advancing the main quest. This is where you companions hang out when they're not with you (if you don't send them back to where you met them), and you can pay caps to get some useful furniture items, like a crafting bench. Other examples of nominal player housing are the suites you can get at each of the Casinos for making enough money there, the safehouses you can get for aiding major factions, and the Hotel room in Novac you can buy.
* In ''UltimaOnline'', one of the first commercially successful {{MMORPG}}s, a player with enough gold could buy a deed to a house and then place it almost anywhere in the game world. This led to the online equivalent of a housing bubble as available land was quickly claimed, and newer players could only buy an existing house or hope for a negligent player to allow their home to fall into collapse (thus freeing up some of the limited landscape). In the late Nineties UO properties could be found on eBay for hundreds of US dollars. The advantages of housing in UO included item storage, easy access to item crafting (forges, looms, etc.), a safe place to practice skills (given the early PVP everywhere environment), and prestige. Given this was one of the first online examples of home ownership and the developers did not fully anticipate [[HumansAreBastards human nature]], the disadvantages included burglary, home invasion, stalking, etc. But those were the good old days.
* ''Good god, {{Minecraft}}''. You punch trees, make sticks, make picks, mine stone, ''and build the greatest house you've ever built.''
* ''VideoGame/{{Terraria}}'', too. It may be 2D, but it's pretty similar to ''{{Minecraft}}''. You have '''so many items''' to pick from when [[AnInteriorDesignerIsYou customizing your home]], and, like ''{{Minecraft}}'', you build it from scratch, so it truly is ''your'' home.
* ''WurmOnline'' as well, which is superficially similar to ''Minecraft'' but a few orders of magnitude more complicated. The end results, be it a 2x2 hut with a vegetable patch or a magnificent villa, is still immensely satisfying once you've nailed the last plank into place.
* The later ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'' games would have these as save points. Notably, in ''GTA: San Andreas'', these also can be used to access your wardrobe. Changing just one part of your outfit erases your wanted level. Think about it.
** Also, buy a piece of clothing once and you can access it from ''every'' safehouse in the state.
* ''TestDrive Unlimited'', in both the first and second games, they allow you to buy houses that, the more luxurious they are, the more cars you can hold in it's garage. This goes from a crappy caravan with a two car garage shack to a house on the side of a hill with waterfalls and an eight car garage. Then there are the yachts that go for five to seven million on Ibiza or Hawaii, respectively.
* ''VideoGame/RuneScape'' has a Construction skill that allows you to build and customise a house, starting from a little one-room shack and potentially becoming a huge castle with a dungeon other players can explore.
* ''VideoGame/DragonQuestX'' lets you build a house [[AnInteriorDesignerIsYou which can then be customized]].
* ''[[VideoGame/MassEffect1 Mass Effect]]'' contains one as a reward for HundredPercentCompletion of the "Pinnacle Station" DLC. It contains a limitless stock of grenades and medi-gel, as well as a computer terminal to procure rare equipment for fairly low prices. It is never mentioned again though.
* In ''{{Spellforce}} 2'' you're awarded (by plot) with control over a ''fiefdom'' for your heroic efforts in warning the human kingdom of the impending Shadow Pact invasion. It turns out to be one of the most embattled, troubled provinces in the kingdom that has killed multiple ruling families, and it's up to you to clean it up or die trying. Except you eventually do so well, along with other plot developments, that the king gets suspicious and sends a "pacifying" force in under the pretext of crushing a rebellion you never even considered. It also ends up becoming something of a secondary HubLevel complete with merchants and quest-givers since you're dealing with a whole RTS-style map, after all.
* Much like ''GrandTheftAuto'''s safehouses the ''SaintsRow'' series provides the player with "cribs" where they can access their weapon stash, money vault, and wardrobe as well as customize their gang, rewatch cutscenes or buy furniture upgrades.
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