[[quoteright:250:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/rsz_number_of_the_beast_9351.jpg]]

->''"He's a mad scientist and I'm his beautiful daughter."''
-->--'''Deety Burroughs'''

''The Number of the Beast'' is a 1980 ScienceFiction novel written by Creator/RobertAHeinlein. It is best known for being a MassivelyMultiplayerCrossover that unites every single fictional timeline he had ever written and those of multiple other authors, introducing the concept of TheWorldAsMyth that would be featured in all his subsequent works until his death. When plotted against his "Future History" series, this book is a sequel to ''Literature/TimeEnoughForLove'', and is followed by ''Literature/TheCatWhoWalksThroughWalls''.

The plot centers around four geniuses, Zebediah ("Zeb") John Carter, Dejah Thoris ("Deety") Burroughs, her father Jacob, and their friend Hilda Mae, who find themselves embarking on a zany romp through TheMultiverse thanks to Jacob's newly invented time machine. Along the way, they discover that every single fictional universe ever invented by anyone is real and can be accessed by shifting one's dimensional coordinates appropriately, which ends up taking them into the Literature/{{Lensman}} series, JohnCarterOfMars, the [[Literature/LandOfOz Oz stories]], and many other fictional worlds before they end up in the world of Heinlein's own archprotagonist Lazarus Long. Throughout this process, they are pursued by marauding interdimensional adversaries with the power to rewrite history, who end up possibly being controlled by a rival Author. The book ends with the Burroughs (as Zeb and Hilda have married Deety and Jacob, respectively) joining Lazarus Long's extended family and staging a convention for all the fictional heroes of the multiverse.

Not to be confused with NumberOfTheBeast, the fictional use of the dread "666", although it is referenced by the characters.

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!!This novel provides examples of:

* AbsentMindedProfessor: Jacob can do multidimensional calculus in his head but requires a calculator to get 2+2=4 and often needs Deety or Hilda to [[ForgetsToEat remind him to eat]] or sleep.
* TheAce: Deconstructed with Lazarus, who has grown accustomed to having his every whim obeyed (and usually always being right to boot), and is rather flustered when his patronizing behaviour causes the Burroughs to leave in a snit. Hilda then proceeds to read him the riot act, at which she is applauded by Lazarus' own family, who've apparently been waiting for someone to finally put him in his place. Lazarus then tries to brush it off by claiming he doesn't respect anyone who won't stand up for themselves (true) and it was a SecretTestOfCharacter (false).
* AIIsACrapshoot: [[DiscussedTrope Discussed]] after Lazarus gets into hot water because Dora refuses to obey his command to lie; he observes that it's for the best, as trusting your life to a computer capable of lying would be really foolish.
* AllMythsAreTrue: An obvious corollary to the "World as Myth" is that, if someone ever wrote it, it exists in TheMultiverse. However, any given person's ability to travel there is based on their own subjective experience; in other words, you can only get to "fictional" worlds you're personally familiar with unless someone else has gone there first and recorded the coordinates. Zeb remarks that this can be a very good thing indeed when he finds out that he's the only one of the four who's ever read [[Creator/HPLovecraft The Necronomicon]].
* AlternateHistory: Each universe is delineated by when it got space travel, and is usually named for the first person to walk on Earth's moon in that universe. Some universes diverged at earlier dates (such as 1500), but space travel seems to be the main point of delineation. Some HilarityEnsues when the particulars of these histories get compared.
* AuthorAppeal: As with many of Heinlein's later novels, features heavy helpings of nudism, {{polyamory}}, incest, and sentient female computers. As just one example, the Burroughs don't wear clothes except when they are meeting with other people, and Lazarus' family only wears them for formal occasions. Not to mention the entire "World as Myth" concept which lets Heinlein get all his characters together into one massive continuity crossover.
* BiTheWay: Pretty much all the major characters. Deety and Hilda kiss several times and clearly enjoy it, Jake has a quick flashback to a gay encounter from his youth. Only Zeb expresses any significant discomfort with homosexuality. The Longs, of course, have long since discarded any inhibitions in this regard.
* BiggerOnTheInside: Glinda's magic renders Gay Deceiver into this by adding a few extradimensional rooms to her rear compartment.
* BotheringByTheBook: When Jacob takes his turn as commanding officer, the others (instigated by Hilda) subject him to a "white mutiny" as payback for his antics during Zeb's and Hilda's turns.
* CasualInterstellarTravel: The obvious consequence of a device that allows one to travel anywhere, anywhen, in any universe, in zero time, with zero power consumption. The corollary, of course, is that it makes interstellar/interuniversal war practical for the first time in human history, which [[SequelHook segues directly into the sequel]].
* CommunicationsOfficer: When Hilda is captain of the ''Gay Deceiver'', Zeb acts as her comm officer, especially when talking with the British colonists on Mars.
* CosmicRetcon: Explicitly enabled by the Burroughs device; a variant of this helps the team rescue Lazarus' mother, Maureen, from 20th century Earth. Several minor story elements from ''Literature/MethuselahsChildren'' and ''Literature/TimeEnoughForLove'' get worked over in this manner in this and subsequent novels.
* CrapsackOnlyByComparison: Our protagonists run into several such worlds. One of these, merely described, indicates abrupt Earth Drift.
* DiamondsInTheBuff: Deety does this in direct {{Homage}} to ''JohnCarterOfMars''.
* ForgetsToEat: Jacob, frequently.
* FreeLoveFuture: The Burroughs start out fairly conventional, but end up being decidedly casual about who sleeps with whom, and Lazarus takes this UpToEleven in his extended family, with just about everyone sleeping with everyone else by the end.
* GainaxEnding: Does the subplot with the Black Hats ever get resolved? Not really, the protagonists just shrug off their RetGone status back home and hold a big party. However, ''The Cat Who Walks Through Walls'' does take this up and deal with it.
* GenderBender: Among Lazarus Long's family, the Burroughs are surprised to meet a ''female'', resurrected Libby Andrew Long, formerly ''Andy'' Libby and a major figure in ''Methuselah's Children''. It turns out that Lazarus used TimeTravel to find Andy's corpse (which was [[BurialInSpace buried in space]]) in order to rejuvenate/resurrect him with modern technology. In the process of doing so, it was discovered that Andy had a female gender identity (and XXY sex chromosomes), and so they worked some genetic magic to make "him" into Libby Andy.
* GoodWithNumbers: Deety can do extremely complicated math in her head. Libby has the same talent, and when they meet they each (modestly) say that the other is a hair faster. Of course, they're so much faster than any normal person that only they could tell. Jake, by contrast, can only handle figures when expressed geometrically; Deety says he's no good at "kitchen math".
* GeniusBreedingAct: It's briefly suggested that the four members of the ''Gay Deceiver'' crew ought to have babies together, as they're all extremely intelligent and would presumably pass that on to their offspring. In ''Literature/TheCatWhoWalksThroughWalls'', they and the Longs have had several communal children, all of whom are hypergeniuses.
* HaveAGayOldTime: Gay Deceiver is a car-turned-spaceship, that Zeb named. There are ''many'' reasons why she can't be homosexual.
* IgnoreTheFanservice: This is how Zeb and Deety clue to the fact that the "park ranger" accosting them is an alien; Deety's abrupt strip tease does not distract him or even engage his interest.
* InfiniteSupplies: Averted initially, as the travelers worry a great deal about "juice" (fuel) for Gay Deceiver and how much they've managed to pack in terms of food and clothing. Hilda in particular has barely anything when they first set off. After they visit Oz, however, Glinda uses her magic to bestow Gay with an infinite supply of fuel (in addition to [[BiggerOnTheInside several extra compartments]] she didn't have before) and the Burroughs with a picnic basket containing infinite food.
* InterdimensionalTravelDevice: Professor Burroughs' invention of one (by [[WritersCannotDoMath blatantly ignoring the rules of vector arithmetic]]) is what drives the plot.
* LiteralGenie: Being just a computer before becoming a fully-fledged SpaceshipGirl, Gay causes a few issues by being this. In particular, an incautiously-worded sentence can activate her [[WarpWhistle command codes]] unintentionally.
* LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters: In the last third of the book, many characters from other Heinlein books are encountered; including Lazarus Long, [[Literature/TheMoonIsAHarshMistress Hazel Stone]], [[Literature/StrangerInAStrangeLand Jubal Harshaw]], [[Literature/GloryRoad Oscar Gordon, Star, Dr. Rufo]], et al. Earlier on, characters from non-Heinlein books are seen or mentioned; including about a dozen [[Literature/LandOfOz Oz]] characters, [[Literature/AliceInWonderland the White Rabbit]], and [[Literature/{{Lensman}} Worsel]]. Most notably, some real people are mentioned, such as [[Creator/LewisCarroll Charles Dodgson]]. At the convention in the end of the book, several mentions are made that the characters are waiting for "Isaac, Bob, and Arthur," which is a not-so-subtle reference to the "Big Three" authors of the Golden Age of Science Fiction: Creator/IsaacAsimov, Creator/RobertAHeinlein, and ArthurCClarke. Asimov actually gets discussed more than Heinlein, which is fitting as the two were old friends and colleagues.
** Heinlein even takes the opportunity to poke some fun at Asimov, mentioning that he's "slowed down" to only writing about 20 books a year, and that he can have his head turned simply by having an attractive woman sit on his lap.
* MadScientist: Jacob identifies as this, in a self-deprecating way. He turns out to be anything but mad.
* MadScientistsBeautifulDaughter: [[InvokedTrope Invoked]] word-for-word by Deety, in the first line of the novel quoted above. It's a pick up line to Zeb.
* MassivelyMultiplayerCrossover: The Convention for Pantheistic Multiperson Solipsism.
* MeaningfulName: Zebediah ''John Carter'' and ''Dejah Thoris'' Burroughs were both intentionally named (by their parents) for characters in the ''JohnCarterOfMars'' series. This is {{Lampshaded}} by the characters themselves, who are naturally both fans of it.
** Every villain's name is an anagram of either Heinlein's name, or of his wife Virginia's.
* TheMultiverse: The basic premise of the book.
* MutuallyFictional: A core principle of the "World as Myth". See RecursiveCanon for more fun with this.
* TheNapoleon: Hilda Mae Burroughs - small, check. Bullheaded, check. Gets all MamaBear when you mess with her family. Very check. Do not patronize or fuck with her.
* NukeEm: Employed by the Black Hats as a desperation measure to kill the protagonists before they can make an escape with the Burroughs Device. Zeb's precognition barely saves them.
* NumberOfTheBeast: [[DiscussedTrope Discussed]] by the protagonists for in-universe ParanoiaFuel, as the total number of accessible universes in the six-axis dimensional system employed by the Burroughs device is postulated to be 6^6^6 [[note]](10,314,424,798,490,535,546,171,949,056)[[/note]]. This of course inspires the title of the book.
* ParentalIncest:
** It is implied that Deety and Jacob might do this. She says early on that she would never refuse her father if he approached her, and when the Longs suggest she and Jake should mate to [[GeniusBreedingAct create a super-smart baby]], she says that the matter will have to be resolved between Jake and Zeb.
** Lazarus and his mother resume the relationship they started in ''Time Enough for Love'', after the group rescues Maureen from 20th century Earth and she is rejuvenated. The difference is that this time, she knows he's her son.
* PhallicWeapon: Hilariously lampshaded by Zeb, who freely admits that his HandCannon is indeed a penis substitute; he carries it specifically to compensate for the fact that he can't kill someone from thirty meters away with his dick.
* PhonyDegree: Zeb twists this trope into a pretzel. His doctorate in education came from a legitimate university, and he met all academic requirements. He freely admits to deliberately gaming the system to get that degree, to show that degrees ''per se'' are meaningless.
** Apparently Lazarus owns a diploma mill in his home timeline/universe.
* {{Polyamory}}: Lazarus Long's extended family is this. The Burroughs join them. See also FreeLoveFuture.
* RecursiveCanon: A necessary part of the "World as Myth"; it is all but directly stated that the Burroughs' world is also the creation of an Author (and, of course, Lazarus Long's stories exist in the Burroughs' universe), but there is apparently some unwritten rule that you can't read your own story in someone else's universe, lest a paradox be created. To make things even more entertaining, Lazarus apparently knows where/when to meet the Burroughs ''by reading this book'', at least up to the point where he gets involved. Also, the notion of a malevolent Author messing with the Burroughs takes on multiple levels of recursive MindScrew when one realizes that the author in question is Heinlein himself.
* RetGone: When the Burroughs try to return to their own universe after meeting with Lazarus Long, they find out that this has happened to them there, possibly at the hands of the Author who was pursuing them in the first place.
* RetroactivePrecognition: Used all over the place, particularly when the protagonists use their knowledge of the past to stage the rescue of Lazarus' mother, Maureen, from the late 20th century.
* SelfDeprecation: When the main characters realize that they're traveling to worlds from their favorite works of fiction, Hilda asks that they all write lists of their favorite works. After the tally is completed, Zeb asks if Creator/RobertAHeinlein got any votes. Hilda says that he got two votes for his Future History stories, and two for ''Literature/StrangerInAStrangeLand''. Zeb says that he has no intention of asking who voted for ''Literature/StrangerInAStrangeLand'', disparaging the book by saying "[[MoneyDearBoy The things some people will do for money]]."
* SpaceshipGirl: Zeb's car, Gay Deceiver, who starts out nonsentient but, thanks to upgrades from the team (and later [[AWizardDidIt Glinda]]), takes on a full-fledged personality later in the story. Then they meet up with Lazarus Long and his spaceship Dora, who is fully intelligent as well.
* SpiderSense: Zeb's {{Psychic Power|s}}, allowing him to react instinctively in the split second before danger strikes. It saves the team's lives on multiple occasions, including from the nuclear blast that destroys their home.
* SteamPunk: The original Mars-Ten, which they spend a large portion of time in, is a steampunk world.
* SwitchingPOV: We get chapters narrated in first person by each of the four, and Lazarus Long gets a chapter too.
* TeleportationTropes: The method of time/dimensional travel used lends itself to a lot of these.
** TeleportersAndTransporters: The Borroughs device. Also Gay Deceiver after the device is mounted in her.
** TeleFrag: After a moment of in-universe FridgeHorror, Gay gets programmed with steps to avoid this. Not that it keeps them from almost crashing into things at their destination by normal means...
** WarpWhistle: Gay's command codes. Many lead to safe or relatively safe positions ("Gay Bug Out" leads to an uninhabited field on Mars, for instance); "Gay Bounce" just goes ten kilometers straight up, and is used as part of the failsafe against TeleFrag incidents.
* ThisPageWillSelfDestruct: Deety (a computer scientist) mentions that their family's account records are rigged such that if anyone unauthorized tries to access them, they'll get a cooked "clean" copy while the real records quietly erase themselves.
* TimeTravel: Thanks to the Burroughs device. It turns out that time is only one of the major dimensional axes that one can travel on; there are two others in addition to the traditional four, and any of them can be accessed by rotation or translation, providing a number of possible universes approaching infinity.
** It is notable that Lazarus' universe ''already'' featured TimeTravel prior to the Burroughs' arrival; it was merely inconvenient and difficult to calculate properly, and only worked within the one universe.
* TitleDrop: The "NumberOfTheBeast" is mentioned several times. Also, at one point near the end, Jubal Harshaw is discussing culture shock, and calls himself a "Literature/StrangerInAStrangeLand," which is the title of the book that he's from. Deety also claims ''not'' to be a "stranger in a strange land" in Oz, as she is so familiar with the stories.
* YearInsideHourOutside: More like "infinite time inside, zero time outside" since the Burroughs device allows you to shift your time axes as well as your space axes. The protagonists speculate that it would make a great enterprise to sell students extra time to study for their exams, or vacations that take zero time away from work. The sequels find the technology being put to a very similar use.
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