''Series/DoctorWho'' spin-off novels published from 1997 by BBC Books. Where the Literature/EighthDoctorAdventures featured the new Doctor introduced in the 1996 TV movie, the Past Doctor Adventures told new adventures featuring the first seven Doctors. (In other words, much like Virgin Publishing's Literature/DoctorWhoMissingAdventures, except that the seventh Doctor was now Past instead of being [[Literature/DoctorWhoNewAdventures New]].)

[[folder:Novels in this series]]
* ''The Devil Goblins from Neptune'' (June, 1997) by Martin Day and Keith Topping. Features the Third Doctor, and Dr. Elizabeth "Liz" Shaw.
* ''The Murder Game'' (July, 1997) by Steve Lyons. Features the Second Doctor, Ben Jackson, and Polly.
* ''The Ultimate Treasure'' (August, 1997) by Christopher Bulis. Features the Fifth Doctor, and Perpugilliam "Peri" Brown.
* ''Business Unusual'' (September, 1997) by Gary Russell. Features the Sixth Doctor, Melanie "Mel" Bush, and Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart.
* ''Illegal Alien'' (October, 1997) by Mike Tucker and Robert Perry. Features the Seventh Doctor, and Ace.
* ''The Roundheads'' (November, 1997) by Mark Gatiss. Features the Second Doctor, Ben Jackson, Polly, and Jamie [=McCrimmon=].
* ''The Face of the Enemy'' (January, 1998) by David A. [=McIntee=]. Features the Third Doctor, the Master, Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart, Ian Chesterton, Barbara Wright, and Harry Sullivan.
* ''Eye of Heaven'' (February, 1998) by Jim Mortimore. Features the Fourth Doctor, and Leela of the Sevateem.
* ''The Witch Hunters'' (March, 1998) by Steve Lyons. Features the First Doctor, Susan Foreman, Ian Chesterton, and Barbara Wright.
* ''The Hollow Men'' (April, 1998) by Martin Day and Keith Topping. Features the Seventh Doctor, and Ace.
* ''Catastrophea'' (May, 1998) by Terrance Dicks. Features the Third Doctor, and Jo Grant.
* ''Mission: Impractical'' (June, 1998) by David A. [=McIntee=]. Features the Sixth Doctor, and Frobisher.
* ''Zeta Major'' (July, 1998) by Simon Messingham. Features the Fifth Doctor, Tegan Jovanka, and Nyssa of Traken.
* ''Dreams of Empire'' (August, 1998) by Justin Richards. Features the Second Doctor, Jamie [=McCrimmon=], and Victoria Waterfield.
* ''Last Man Running'' (September, 1998) by Chris Boucher. Features the Fourth Doctor, and Leela of the Sevateem.
* ''Matrix'' (October, 1998) by Mike Tucker and Robert Perry. Features the Seventh Doctor, and Ace. AlternateReality versions of the other Doctor incarnations and a few of their companions also figure into the plot.
* ''The Infinity Doctors'' (November, 1998) by Lance Parkin. Features an unspecified incarnation of the Doctor.
* ''Salvation'' (January, 1999) by Steve Lyons. Features the First Doctor, Steven Taylor, and Dorothea "Dodo" Chaplet.
* ''The Wages of Sin'' (February, 1999) by David A. [=McIntee=]. Features the Third Doctor, Jo Grant, and Dr. Elizabeth "Liz" Shaw.
* ''Deep Blue'' (March, 1999) by Mark Morris. Features the Fifth Doctor, Tegan Jovanka, and Vislor Turlough.
* ''Players'' (April, 1999) by Terrance Dicks. Features the Sixth Doctor, and Perpugilliam "Peri" Brown.
* ''Millennium Shock'' (May, 1999) by Justin Richards. Features the Fourth Doctor, and Harry Sullivan.
* ''Storm Harvest'' (June, 1999) by Mike Tucker and Robert Perry. Features the Seventh Doctor, and Ace.
* ''The Final Sanction'' (July, 1999) by Steve Lyons. Features the Second Doctor, Jamie [=McCrimmon=], and Zoe Heriot.
* ''City at World's End'' (September, 1999) by Christopher Bulis. Features the First Doctor, Susan Foreman, Ian Chesterton, and Barbara Wright.
* ''Divided Loyalties'' (October, 1999) by Gary Russell. Features the Fifth Doctor, Adric, Nyssa of Traken, and Tegan Jovanka.
* ''Corpse Marker'' (November, 1999) by Chris Boucher. Features the Fourth Doctor, and Leela of the Sevateem.
* ''Last of the Gaderene'' (January, 2000) by Mark Gatiss. Features the Third Doctor, Jo Grant, Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart, Sergeant Benton, and Captain Yates.
* ''Tomb of Valdemar'' (February, 2000) by Simon Messingham. Features the Fourth Doctor, Romana I, and K-9.
* ''Verdigris'' (April, 2000) by Paul Magrs. Features the Third Doctor, Jo Grant, and Iris Wildthyme.
* ''Grave Matter'' (May, 2000) by Justin Richards. Features the Sixth Doctor, and Perpugilliam "Peri" Brown.
* ''Heart of TARDIS'' (June, 2000) by Dave Stone. Features the Second Doctor, the Fourth Doctor, Jamie [=McCrimmon=], Victoria Waterfield, and Romana I. Two versions of the Doctor work the same case.
* ''Prime Time'' (July, 2000) by Mike Tucker. Features the Seventh Doctor, and Ace.
* ''Imperial Moon'' (August, 2000) by Christopher Bulis. Features the Fifth Doctor, Vislor Turlough, and Kamelion.
* ''Festival of Death'' (September, 2000) by Jonathan Morris. Features the Fourth Doctor, Romana II, and K-9.
* ''Independence Day'' (October, 2000) by Peter Darvill-Evans. Features the Seventh Doctor and Ace. The Second Doctor and Jamie [=McCrimmon=] appear in the introduction.
* ''The King of Terror'' (November, 2000) by Keith Topping. Features the Fifth Doctor, Tegan Jovanka, Vislor Turlough, and Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart.
* ''The Quantum Archangel'' (January, 2001) by Craig Hinton. Features The Sixth Doctor, Melanie "Mel" Bush, and the Master. An AlternateReality version of the Third Doctor also appears. There are cameos of Katarina, Sara Kingdom, Adric, and Kamelion.
* ''Bunker Soldiers'' (February, 2001) by Martin Day. Features the Fist Doctor, Steven Taylor, and Dorothea "Dodo" Chaplet.
* ''Rags'' (March, 2001) by Mick Lewis. Features the Third Doctor, and Jo Grant.
* ''The Shadow in the Glass'' (April, 2001) by Justin Richards and Stephen Cole. Features the Sixth Doctor, and Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart.
* ''Asylum'' (May, 2001) by Peter Darvill-Evans. Features the Fourth Doctor, and Nyssa of Traken.
* ''Superior Beings'' (June, 2001) by Nick Walters. Features the Fifth Doctor, and Perpugilliam "Peri" Brown.
* ''Byzantium!'' (July, 2001) by Keith Topping. Features the First Doctor, Ian Chesterton, Barbara Wright, and Vicki.
* ''Bullet Time'' (August, 2001) by David A. [=McIntee=]. Features the Seventh Doctor, and Sarah Jane Smith.
* ''Psi-ence Fiction'' (September, 2001) by Chris Boucher. Features the Fourth Doctor, and Leela of the Sevateem.
* ''Dying in the Sun'' (October, 2001) by Jon de Burgh Miller. Features the Second Doctor, Ben Jackson, and Polly.
* ''Instruments of Darkness'' (November, 2001) by Gary Russell. Features the Sixth Doctor, Melanie "Mel" Bush, and Dr. Evelyn Smythe.
* ''Relative Dementias'' (January, 2002) by Mark Michalowski. Features the Seventh Doctor, and Ace.
* ''Drift'' (February, 2002) by Simon A. Forward. Features the Fourth Doctor, and Leela of the Sevateem.
* ''Palace of the Red Sun'' (March, 2002) by Christopher Bulis. Features the Sixth Doctor, and Perpugilliam "Peri" Brown.
* ''Amorality Tale'' (April, 2002) by David Bishop. Features the Third Doctor, and Sarah Jane Smith.
* ''Warmonger'' (May, 2002) by Terrance Dicks. Features the Fifth Doctor, and Perpugilliam "Peri" Brown.
* ''Ten Little Aliens'' (June, 2002) by Stephen Cole. Features the First Doctor, Ben Jackson, and Polly.
* ''Combat Rock'' (July, 2002) by Mick Lewis. Features the Second Doctor, Jamie [=McCrimmon=], and Victoria Waterfield.
* ''The Suns of Caresh'' (August, 2002) by Paul Saint. Features the Third Doctor, and Jo Grant.
* ''Heritage'' (October, 2002) by Dale Smith. Features the Seventh Doctor, and Ace. A daughter of Mel is a major character.
* ''Fear of the Dark'' (January, 2003) by Trevor Baxendale. Features the Fifth Doctor, Tegan Jovanka, and Nyssa of Traken.
* ''Blue Box'' (March, 2003) by Kate Orman. Features the Sixth Doctor, and Perpugilliam "Peri" Brown.
* ''Loving the Alien'' (May, 2003) by Mike Tucker and Robert Perry. Features the Seventh Doctor, and Ace.
* ''The Colony of Lies'' (July, 2003) by Colin Brake. Features the Second Doctor, Jamie [=McCrimmon=], and Zoe Heriot. The Seventh Doctor and Ace appear in a number of chapters.
* ''Wolfsbane'' (September, 2003) by Jacqueline Rayner. Features the Fourth Doctor, the Eighth Doctor, Sarah Jane Smith, and Harry Sullivan. Two versions of the Doctor work the same case.
* ''Deadly Reunion'' (November, 2003) by Terrance Dicks and Barry Letts. Features the Third Doctor, Jo Grant, and Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart.
* ''Scream of the Shalka'' (February, 2004) by Paul Cornell. Novelization of the animated series. Features its own version of the Ninth Doctor, along with Alison Cheney, and the Master.
* ''Empire of Death'' (March, 2004) by David Bishop. Features the Fifth Doctor, and Nyssa of Traken. A "ghost" version of Adric figures into the plot.
* ''The Eleventh Tiger'' (May, 2004) by David A. [=McIntee=]. Features the First Doctor, Ian Chesterton, Barbara Wright, and Vicki.
* ''Synthespians™'' (July, 2004) by Craig Hinton. Features the Sixth Doctor, and Perpugilliam "Peri" Brown.
* ''The Algebra of Ice'' (September, 2004) by Lloyd Rose. Features the Seventh Doctor, Ace, and Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart.
* ''The Indestructible Man'' (November, 2004) by Simon Messingham. Features the Second Doctor, Jamie [=McCrimmon=], and Zoe Heriot. The novel includes Dystopian versions of the characters and organizations from ''{{Series/Stingray|1964}}'', ''Series/{{Thunderbirds}}'', ''Series/CaptainScarletAndTheMysterons'', and ''Series/{{UFO}}''.
* ''Match of the Day'' (January, 2005) by Chris Boucher. Features the Fourth Doctor, and Leela of the Sevateem.
* ''Island of Death'' (July, 2005) by Barry Letts. Features the Third Doctor, Sarah Jane Smith, and Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart.
* ''Spiral Scratch'' (August, 2005) by Gary Russell. Features the Sixth Doctor, and Melanie "Mel" Bush. AlternateReality versions of the other Doctor incarnations and a few of their companions also figure into the plot.
* ''Fear Itself'' (September, 2005) by Nick Wallace. Features the Eighth Doctor, Fitzgerald "Fitz" Kreiner, and Anji Kapoor.[[note]]Published as a Past Doctor Adventure rather than an Eighth Doctor Adventure as the book had been delayed and was published after the "official" last Eight Doctor Adventure and the TV debut of the Ninth.[[/note]]
* ''World Game'' (October, 2005) by Terrance Dicks. Features the Second Doctor, and Lady Serena.
* ''The Time Travellers'' (November, 2005) by Simon Guerrier. Features the First Doctor, Susan Foreman, Ian Chesterton, and Barbara Wright.
* ''Atom Bomb Blues'' (December, 2005) by Andrew Cartmel. Features the Seventh Doctor, and Ace. Last novel in this series.
[[/folder]]

!!This series provides examples of:
* ADayInTheLimelight: For Ian, Barbara, UNIT and [[VillainEpisode the Master]] in ''Face of the Enemy'', as the Doctor was involved in "The Curse of Peladon" at the time.
* AirborneAircraftCarrier: Deconstructed (along with various other GerryAnderson tropes) in ''The Indestructible Man''. SKYHOME is derided as a pollution-spewing technological white elephant that uses the power of a small country just to remain stable (it has a tendency to lurch at unpredictable moments, sending equipment everywhere) and is too expensive to break up, yet can't be allowed to degrade for fear it'll crash on everyone's head.
* AliensStealCable: In ''Synthespians™'', human colonists in the future do this with broadcasts from Earth. It's pointed out that until they had the help of the [[spoiler:Nestene Consciousness]], the shows were so degraded it was like watching it through a snow storm.
* AnachronicOrder: ''Eye of Heaven'', ''Festival Of Death''.
* ContinuityNod: ''The Infinity Doctors'' sees an interesting use of this trope, as it incorporates elements from every official version of Gallifrey up to its publication in November 1998. ''Every'' version, including the contradictory ones.
* ContinuitySnarl: ''The Infinity Doctors'' is a [[TropesAreNotBad deliberate]] use of this trope. WordOfGod says it's situated somewhere in Doctor Who continuity... the trouble is, it doesn't seem to fit anywhere, because there's always one piece of continuity that seems to contradict a specific placing. Even [[TheNthDoctor the incarnation of the Doctor]] it features is left unspecified. All of which is [[RiddleForTheAges entirely intentional]].
* CreatingLifeIsBad: Explored in ''Heritage'', in which a scientist who has become obsessed with becoming the first to produce a perfect human clone has resorted to murder to further his ends. When the Doctor confronts the scientist, he reveals that the scientist actually ''isn't'' the first to discover human cloning -- but the secret has always been forgotten. ''Not'', interestingly enough, because cloning is somehow 'unnatural', but because in trying to create life artificially the people involved forget how precious life is, no matter how it is created, and end up treating it as a disposable commodity -- just as the scientist has done. Upon being confronted with both the futility of his life's work and precisely what a monster he's ultimately let himself become, [[VillainousBreakdown the scientist doesn't react well]].
* CrossThrough: A StoryArc in which the companions of various Doctors were seemingly killed in TimeyWimeyBall situations. This tied into the "Sabbath" arc in the Literature/EighthDoctorAdventures. One of these [=PDAs=], ''Wolfsbane'', also featured the Eighth Doctor during the [=EDAs=]' "amnesiac on Earth" arc.
* DeadlyDodging: In ''The Eleventh Tiger'', the Doctor does this to the Gung Fu School bully who challenges him to a duel.
* {{Deconstruction}}: ''The Indestructible Man'' by Simon Messingham is a deconstruction of all Gerry Anderson's work, asking ''why'' Jeff Tracy founded the Series/{{Thunderbirds}}, what SHADO personnel would ''really'' be like (yes ''Series/{{UFO}}'' was DarkerAndEdgier to begin with, but Messingham takes it further), and how the ordinary people of the {{Supermarionation}} world might feel about so much money being channeled into AwesomeButImpractical vehicles. Most notably, the title Indestructible Man is a CaptainErsatz Series/{{Captain Scarlet|AndTheMysterons}} who feels [[CyberneticsEatYourSoul detached from humanity]] and [[WhoWantsToLiveForever wishes he was able to die]].
* DefaceOfTheMoon: "Moon Grafitti" in ''More Short Trips''.
* DiscontinuityNod: ''Business Unusual'' demotes "[[Recap/DoctorWho1985JFIGSAFixWithSontarans A Fix With Sontarans]]" to AllJustADream.
* EenieMeenieMinyMoai: ''Eye of Heaven'' reveals that, like most things in the Whoniverse, the moai were put there by AncientAstronauts. They're alien computers that run a [[TeleportersAndTransporters Transmat]] network.
* EverythingIsOnline: In ''Millennium Shock'', the Big Bad has spent years planting alien microchips in all kinds of things, precisely so they can do this.
* EverythingsBetterWithPenguins: ''Mission: Impractical'' features Frobisher the shape-shifting penguin from the ''Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine'' comic strip (and shamelessly declines to offer any hints about what he's doing in a novel supposedly based only on the TV series).
* EvilOnlyHasToWinOnce: In ''Festival of Death'', the Doctor and his allies prevent an EldritchAbomination from eating the universe. So far, just another day in the office for the Doctor. But there are several time loops involved, so there's a sense in which the adventure is happening over and over again forever -- and if the Doctor and his allies slip up even once, it's goodbye universe.
-->"Yes," said [[spoiler:the baby, opening its eyes]]. "The Doctor succeeded. This time."
* FixFic: ''Spiral Scratch'' turns the Doctor's Bridge Drop in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS24E1TimeAndTheRani Time and the Rani]]" into a HeroicSacrifice.
* TheGreys: The Nedenah in ''The Devil Goblins From Neptune''. Sha'ol the Tzun in ''Mission: Impractical''.
* GroundhogDayLoop: ''Festival of Death'' features a race with this as their [[PlanetOfHats hat]]; after they die, they [[spoiler:loop around back to the start and remember exactly how they screwed up]]. Because everybody has it, they're not limited to fixing the errors of a single day, or a single lifetime: they can adjust the course of their entire history. (If fixing a screw-up requires action more than one lifetime ago, [[spoiler:a message can be passed back by a newborn child telling an adult, who waits to be reborn then passes the message on in the same way.]]) Fortunately for everyone else they're not interested in using their abilities to conquer other planets, or anything petty like that; the messages that have been passed back from the end of their history have given them something far more important to worry about.
* GunsAkimbo: The Master, during a JohnWoo-esque fight scene in ''Face of the Enemy''.
* HistoricalDomainCharacter:
** Various people associated with the Salem witch trials in ''The Witch Hunters''
** Various people associated with the English Civil War in ''The Roundheads''
** RasputinTheMadMonk et al. in ''Wages of Sin''
* IdenticalGrandson: ''The Eleventh Tiger'' teases the idea [[spoiler:that Ian Chesterton has crossed his own timestream as the amnesiac Major Chesterton, before revealing the Major is actually Ian's Identical Great-Great-Grandfather]].
* IntercontinuityCrossover: One of the characters in ''Corpse Marker'', by Chris Boucher, previously appeared in one of Boucher's episodes of ''Series/BlakesSeven ''.
* {{Interquel}}: Nearly every Past Doctor novel is set between two episodes of the TV series, with the exception of ''Fear Itself'' (published after the Literature/EighthDoctorAdventures wrapped up, and set between two earlier [=EDAs=]) and possibly also of ''The Infinity Doctors'' (deliberately ambiguous as to placement). Most of the Seventh Doctor novels are set in the long gap between the last episode of the ongoing series and the 1996 TV movie. (Where this puts them in respect to the [=NAs=], set within the same gap, is up for debate, since the BBC's policy was to neither confirm nor deny the Virgin novels' canon status, and certainly not to provide official guidance on how they fitted into the continuity.)
* LandmarkingTheHiddenBase: Canary Wharf is the headquarters of the British time travelling military in an [[AlternateUniverse alternate 2006]] visited by the First Doctor in ''The Time Travellers''.
* LaserGuidedKarma: The fate of Koel [[spoiler:Paddox]] in ''Festival of Death''. [[spoiler:In an attempt to save his parents, who died in a shuttle accident when he was a boy, he wipes out a species as research into how they are able to resurrect at the beginning of their lives with memories of how the last one went, in the hope of doing this himself. He succeeds, but is unable to change anything, only live all the tragedies and atrocities of his life over again. And again. And again...]]
* LastOfHisKind: Sha'ol in ''Mission: Impractical''.
* LeaningOnTheFourthWall: On p229 (of 280) in the deeply MindScrew-y ''The Infinity Doctors'', the Doctor, confronted with a book of infinite pages, says:
-->"The best thing about a book is that you can always tell when you're getting to the end. No matter how tricky the situation the hero's in, you hold the book in your hand and say 'Hang on, I'm two hundred and twenty-nine pages in, with only another fifty-one to go. It started slow, but it's building to a climax.'"
* LeaveBehindAPistol: ''The Devil Goblins From Neptune'' features a subversion; a spy who's been acting to undermine UNIT has discovered that his superiors have betrayed him, and has been captured and tortured by them as a result when he tried to defect. Later, one of his minders appears to leave a gun behind to end the spy's misery; he tries to, only to learn it's not loaded. His former boss then enters the room and bluntly tells him that ''he'll'' be the one to decide when it ends for him.
* ManInTheIronMask: The central character in ''Dreams of Empire''.
* MillenniumBug: ''Millennium Shock''. Of course, in this case, there are aliens involved.
* MirrorUniverse: ''Face of the Enemy'', which returns to the mirror 'verse from "Inferno".
* MultipleChoicePast: In ''The Infinity Doctors'', the Doctor meets four Knights at the end of the universe, who don't remember their pasts but who each have a different theory as to who they are: [[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E2TheDaleks the last surviving Thals]]; a group of [[Recap/DoctorWhoTVMTheTVMovie human/Gallifreyan hybrids]]; the only [[Literature/DoctorWhoNewAdventures People of the Worldsphere]] who didn't AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence; or the [[Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine High Evolutionaries]]. Since a couple of these theories involve [[AlternateContinuity Alternate Continuities]] to the BBC books, this may be interpreted to give the entire Whoniverse a MultipleChoicePast.
* NoCelebritiesWereHarmed: The British Prime Minister Terry Brooks in ''Millennium Shock'' is a caricature of TonyBlair.
* OfficerOHara: ''Illegal Alien'', which transposes a number of American hardboiled detective tropes to Britain, plays with it by having a Northern Irish Chief Inspector in [[UsefulNotes/ScotlandYard the Met]], who says things like "Saints preserve us", but also suspects all Irish-Americans of being IRA sympathisers.
* OfficialCouple: Ian and Barbara in... pretty much every novel featuring them. ''Byzantium!'' establishes that they married sometime after returning to 1966.
** Confirmed canon in the TV series continuity - Sarah Jane mentions them in an episode of ''TheSarahJaneAdventures''.
* OriginsEpisode: ''Business Unusual'' finally explains how Mel first met the Doctor.
* OverlyLongName: Lady Serenadellatrovella in ''World Game''.
* PlayfulHacker: Bob Salmon in ''Blue Box''.
* PresentTenseNarrative: ''Tomb of Valdemar''.
* PureIsNotGood: In ''The Algebra of Ice'', the Doctor is somewhat impressed by [[CompleteMonster Brett's]] commitment to being a total OmnicidalManiac.
-->''Even pure darkness was, after all, pure.''
* RasputinianDeath: The original, in ''Wages of Sin'', which turns out [[spoiler:to have been partly down to a time-traveller trying to keep Rasputin alive by, for instance, surreptitiously disposing of the poison before Rasputin drinks it]].
* RetCon: Discussed and deconstructed by the Doctor and the BigBad in ''The Infinity Doctors''.
* RoboticReveal: [[spoiler:Prion]] in ''Dreams of Empire'' is actually an android built to appear human. His under-chassis is based on the [=VETAC=] troopers that [[spoiler: assault Santespri]].
* RoswellThatEndsWell: ''The Devil Goblins From Neptune''
* ShoutOut: ''The King of Terror'' has a character from Southern California mention Dingoes Ate my Baby, Oz's band in ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', as one of his favorite bands.
* SignificantAnagram: [=SeneNet=] in ''Business Unusual''.
* SpaceRomans: In ''Dreams of Empire'', the Doctor encounters the Haddron Republic which is essentially, "What if Caesar crossed the Rubicon unsuccessfully?" IN SPACE!
* StatusCellPhone: Mel's dad from ''Business Unusual'' is a businessman who's extremely proud of his mobile phone. The Doctor, who knows that in ten years they'll be a fraction of the size and a lot more common, isn't impressed.
* SuspiciouslySpecificDenial: In ''Grave Matter'', the Doctor is trapped in a Big Scary House with a character who is slowly being taken over [[spoiler:by microscopic aliens]]. Since she is possessed, she is unable to overtly help the Doctor, but she discovers that she is able to obviously mislead him. They are thus able to escape, due to her saying things like: "There is not, I repeat NOT, a secret passageway hidden behind that bookshelf."
* ThisIsMyNameOnForeign: "Inspector [=LeMaitre=]" in ''Last of the Gaderene'' and "Gospodar" in ''The Quantum Archangel''
* TropeCodifier: ''Festival Of Death'' codified the timey-wimey TemporalParadox plot style that would later become commonplace in the TV series.
* TheTunguskaEvent: The Doctor takes his companions to watch (from a safe distance) in ''Wages of Sin''.
* WaxingLyrical: In ''The Eleventh Tiger'', while the Doctor and his companions are staying at a 19th century ''gongfu'' school (Note that Ian and Barbara are from ten years before the song came out, but the Doctor clearly recognises the accidental reference):
-->[Ian:] "One minute those kids are just running around chaotically, but the next minute they're all focused, and everyone's kung-fu fighting."\\
"Those kids are as fast as lightning," Barbara added.\\
The Doctor raised an eyebrow. "Are they indeed? And was it, perchance, dear boy, a little bit frightening? Hmm?"
----