* At what point between this game and the last did Tektites gain an invulnerability to anything but fireballs? Consider that the two games take place within several years of each other.
** Perhaps there are different species of Tektites, just like there are different species of spiders in RealLife.
*** The entire overworld from the original Zelda can be explored between palaces 2 and 3, and yet none of the old tektites.
**** [[AWizardDidIt Ganon's minions did it.]]
*** Maybe tektites molt? And that explains why they were so wimpy in Zelda 1, could only be killed with fire in Zelda 2, and have been just about every scale of difficulty in between in all the various games? It has to do with how hard their skin is.
* How is Ganon revived if Link falls in a pit of lava or something?
** Some of his minions manage to fish out Link's body before it burns completely to ash...?
*** The triforce jump out of the lava. [[ComicallyMissingThePoint Duh!]]
* Why do the previously aquatic zoras look like [[StockDinosaurs Ankylosauruses]]?
** I thought those were Lizalfos.
*** Nope. The ankylosauruses are Zoras. The "lizalfos" are the shield and spear (orange) or hammer (red and blue) dinosaurs. Oh, and they may not actually be lizalfos. Like a ton of enemies in Zelda II, they were never officially named in English and their Japanese name is "Geru" or "Gelu".
* What is the point of the sleeping monsters found in the houses of some towns? When you try to talk to them, you either get "ZZZZZ...." or just an ellipsis. Their reason for being there is never explained and they don't do anything.
** Talk to them four times in a row and they will give you a hint. The bot in Saria tells you where to find Bagu, the ache in Darunia tells you where to find a heart piece.
*** Thanks for telling me. However, that is one big load of [[GuideDangIt Guide Dang It]]. If you talk to them the first three times and all they do is snore, how could the developers expect you to talk to an apparently useless character four times? Luckily, I found both Bagu and that heart piece by accident the first time I ever played, so I never needed their hints regardless.
* OK, so this is a sequel to the previous game, and in this one you save a sleeping princess called Zelda. My question is what happened to the Zelda you saved in the previous game?
** Nothing. She's busy ruling Hyrule.
* Another one regarding the two Zeldas: How does the existence of the Sleeping Zelda affect Hyrule when she awakens? We know very little about primogeniture in Hyrule, other than that 1) the King does not specify his successor in the case of multiple heirs (the father of Sleeping Zelda hid the Triforce of Courage to prevent his son from gaining the full Triforce when he became King, rather than naming Zelda as heir apparent in his place). 2) Related to 1, the ability to wield the full Triforce is not a prerequisite, since the King's son was still heir apparent even though his father had doubts about his ability to properly wield it. 3) Both male and female heirs can inherit the throne. Other than that, we know nothing of the succession (IE, is primogeniture male-favored, with females only inheriting the throne if no suitable male heirs are available?). If we assume that there ''is'' a King of Hyrule during the time of ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' and ''[[VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink Adventure Of Link]]'' as some material suggests, and the Zelda of the first game is his only child and heir, what would happen when the King dies now that there are ''two'' Zeldas, both with a legitimate claim to the throne of Hyrule? One Zelda is the daughter of the current King, but the Sleeping Zelda would appear to have the senior claim to the throne. Even if Zelda in the original game is a ruling princess, the situation isn't any less muddied. Am I the only one who thinks there's ''substantial'' ground to explore the ramifications to Hyrule of the Sleeping Zelda having awoken?
** Sleeping Zelda leaves with Link to settle down quietly somewhere. She'd ''have'' to know that she's too far out of touch to be a proper ruler.