* ''SonicTheHedgehog'' has so many that it has its [[index]] [[GratuitousEnglish/SonicTheHedgehog own page.]][[/index]]
* As a rule of thumb, in almost EVERY Japanese or East Asian fighting game, when your character is K.O'ed and the words "K.O" appears, it's ALWAYS spelled or announced as ''K.O.'' instead of ''Knock-out'', since it's impossible to pronounce that word in many East Asian languages.
** Though, [[TruthInTelevision "K.O." is a common abbreviation of the term]] even in English-speaking countries
** [[SamuraiShodown Samurai Shodown IV]] instead proudly proclaims "VICTOLY!"
** In ''VideoGame/AdvancedVariableGeo'', all the announcements are written and not-so-fluently voiced in English.
* ''Mario & Wario'', despite being Japan-only, is entirely in English. Kinda makes one wonder why it never saw a U.S. release...
* SNK may well be the kings of this trope, as ''any'' foreign character in their games will have Engrish in their quotes.
** Iori Yagami of ''KingOfFighters'' has an image song, "Kaze no Allegory", where he sings "Don't break my soul, woah oah tonight".
** Krauser, unlike other SNK characters, has been voiced by English-speaking actors in almost every game he's been (Michael Beard in ''Fatal Fury 2'' and ''Fatal Fury Special'', and B.J. Love in ''KOF'' and ''Real Bout'' games).
** [[MetalSlug RAWKET LAWNCHAIR!]]
** ''King of Fighters 2003'' has a particularly amusing one where Mary speaks English in her intro with Terry. "Yewwww rookinforwa noooo pattenha? Awen't yewwwww zaaa wucky lon?"
* On the subject of the ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'' series: in the original Japanese, Eleki Hakushaku (Count Zap) often spoke in gratuitous English. There, we got such gems as "Yeah! Rock and Roll!" and "God Damn." Of course, the dubs have no way of translating.
** In the ''VideoGame/MegaManX'' series, all the games after X5 use Gratuitous English in the names of the bosses. This ended up with atrocities like Metal Shark Player, Infinity Mijinion, and Tornado Tonion.
*** The boss names in the Japanese versions of X1-5 use Gratuitous English as well -- it's just they started translating the names more literally from VideoGame/MegaManX6 onwards.
** The names of X's weapons are also this trope. This became... interesting once he started CallingYourAttacks in later games.
** And from the [[VideoGame/MegaManClassic classic series]], we have [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IpyyucWlLz0 "JUMPU! JUMPU! SLIDINGU! SLIDINGU!"]] a.k.a the Japanese equivalent of ''VideoGame/MegaMan8's'' MostAnnoyingSound.
* All the characters from ''Castle Shikigami 2'' speak in horribly butchered English and make so little sense that it falls into the SoBadItsGood category. Especially notable because the voice actors were native English speakers who had to read the Engrish(Though sometimes they would correct it).
* Chipp Zanuff from ''GuiltyGear'' is supposed to be an American who doesn't know Japanese, but due to the TranslationConvention of the game he speaks it most of the time anyway. This is balanced by his large amount of gratuitous English, usually when swearing or surprised ("HOLY ZEN!"). The example here also points out his inversion in gratuitous ''Japanese''. Like in that example, on the rare occaisions he's actually using Japanese, rather than it being an effect of the TranslationConvention, it's random nonsense that makes no sense in context--he actually shouts "sushi" during one of his attacks, for another example.
** In addition, about 75% of the attacks in the games are [[CallingYourAttacks called out]] in English. This ranges from the good (Chipp and Sol Badguy call their attacks with SurprisinglyGoodEnglish for the most part) to the laughable (Venom's Double Head Morbid: "DOUBAH HEAD MORBIDOH!").
** The PS2 version of ''Guilty Gear X'' had pretty terrible English, every single fight. "Are you ready? Let's go! Let's enjoy a great time!" And... "Heaben o' Hell. Doo wan. Lez rock." This was replaced by better a better English speaker in the English version of ''Guilty Gear XX''...at least until ''[[CapcomSequelStagnation Accent Core]]'', where they replaced the old speaker with a worse one for some infathomable reason when the original/''#Reload''/''Slash'' speaker was perfect.
*** You also get a lot of this in Guilty Gear's spiritual successor ''VideoGame/BlazBlue''. Try performing Ragna's "Gauntlet Hades" and watch how the Japanese voice actor mangles the phrase. And don't get me started on "The Wheel Of Fate Is Turning". Of course, you can set the game to English voice actors as well.
*** GAUNTORETTO HAHDEHZ! GORILLA FATE IS TOINING!
*** IZOCHI SUPAA KURASH!
** The same developer gives us this in their ''FistOfTheNorthStar'' fighting game: "The Time of Retribution. Battle (1,2,etc). Decide the Destiny!" Probably one of their better attempts.
* In a similar vein, Sodom from the ''FinalFight'' and ''Videogame/StreetFighter'' games is an American who's trying to be Japanese. He actually ''inverts'' the trope because he never speaks English, but instead speaks Gratuitous ''Japanese'' by mashing English words together that sound like Japanese phrases. For example, when trying to say "shoushi senban" (meaning "truly pathetic") he says "SHOW SEA SEND BANG!"
* One Japanese ''{{Kirby}} Super Star'' StrategyGuide featured a Great Cave Offensive comic (it read left-to-right a la a Western comic book) at one point, that featured a fedora-wearing Kirby with oddly masculine features in a nonsensical ''Franchise/IndianaJones'' spoof. The kicker? The people writing the guide apparently wrote it in Japanese first, then translated it into English themselves -- as a result, we got gems like "More '''[[BoldInflation SKINNY]]''', less '''ATTRACTIVE''' to my baby!", "Gra'ma said, '''NO PICK''' up '''EVIL'''", and, best of all, "[[{{Narm}} SHIT!]]".
* This often extends to names, too: in ''Videogame/FinalFantasyVI'', the name Tina was considered exotic. If you don't recognise them, they were somewhat [[{{Woolseyism}} thankfully re-translated]] into English when they were translated, so the character became Terra. And then there's the whole "Claude and Alice" [[UrbanLegendOfZelda rumour]].
** Then there's Siegfried, who abandons battle with some gratuitous ''Spanish''. "Adios Amigos!"
** The entire ''FinalFantasy'' franchise in general LOVES it self some GratuitousForeignLanguage. The names of almost everything- titles included- are pronounced the same way in Japanese as English. Example: "Barret Wallace" is pronounced roughly "Bayrlet Walrus."
* In an interesting gaming parallel, the ''VideoGame/{{SSX}}'' series of made-in-Canada snowboarding games features a Japanese character, Kaori, who speaks in a 50/50 mish-mash of fluent Japanese and extremely accented gratuitous English. Given the lack of other non-English-fluent characters, the makers were apparently trying to jointly appeal to trendy Japanese audiences and American fans of Japanese culture. Interestingly, this lack of fluency doesn't impede her interaction with the other snowboarders at all, even a romantic interest.
* The ''X-Men'' arcade game has many plainly spoken engrish phrases, including "Pyro will burn you to toast!", "I am Magneto, Master of Magnet!", "Magneto is in another place" and the (in)famous "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IdAmkx8eAos X-Men, welcome to die!]]" as spoken by Magneto. (This line was parodied in ''MarvelVsCapcom3''.) While not exactly engrish, he also makes the ridiculous insult of "X-chicken!"
** More ''X-Men'' engrish: the first Japanese theme song produced when [[WesternAnimation/{{X-Men}} the '90s animated series]] was brought to Japan has a few random English phrases. The most obvious one is at the end where the singer practically screams with much gusto the line "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I6hB33rUQTQ CRY FOR THE MOON!]]"
* The Japanese version of ''[[Videogame/StreetFighterIII Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike]]'' has the memorable "Let's Blocking" intro for the parry practice bonus stage. (Blocking is what parrying is called in Japanese, but the incongruous "let's" is what makes it MadeOfWin.
** The Japanese track of ''StreetFighter IV'' has a lot of this when calling attacks and giving introductions. Particularly amusing are Balrog (the boxer), who shouts nothing but Engrish in the Japanese track, and El Fuerte, who is ''Mexican''.
*** Cammy from the same game also supplies with some Gratuitous English, such as (among other things) saying "Mission complete" when she wins a fight, and [[CallingYourAttacks calling her attacks]] (as expected from a FightingGame), all of which are in English.
** Also of note is Rolento's victory phrase in ''Street Fighter Alpha 2/3'': MISSHON KONPURIITO.
* ''Videogame/SuperSmashBros''
** [[Videogame/EarthBound Ness]] and [[VideoGame/FZero Captain Falcon]] use gratuitous English when [[CallingYourAttacks calling their attacks]]. ''Super Smash Bros Melee'' retained this, but also inverted it with Marth and Roy speaking GratuitousJapanese.
** Fox and Falco had this in Melee but gained region appropriate voice actors in Brawl.
** In ''Brawl'', Lucas and Zero Suit Samus [[SurprisinglyGoodEnglish avoid]] this by having American voice actors--even in the Japanese version.
*** Then again, Ness comes from EagleLand, so maybe it's justified...
*** Ditto the narrator in all three games.
* Inverted in ''[[http://kotaku.com/348202/gibberish-japanese-in-resident-evil-movie Resident Evil Extinction]]'', where a Japanese subway sign sports nonsensical ''kanji''.
* [[http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/pachirights.png This warning]] from ''[[VideoGame/DonPachi DoDonPachi]]'' and other early Cave ShootEmUps.
* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioSunshine'' has "SHINE GET!" (The "get" was wiped from the North America releases, though.)
** ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy'' has "Star Get!" and "Grand Star Get!". The US release had it rewritten this time, however.
** In ''[[VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiBowsersInsideStory Mario & Luigi: Bowser's Inside Story]]'', Broque Monsieur originally used Gratuitous English, such as "Oh my dog! What's happen?". The English version [[KeepItForeign changed it into]] GratuitousFrench instead.
** "[[VideoGame/MarioKart GOAL!]]"
* The opening ThemeSong to the American release of ''RuneFactory: A Fantasy HarvestMoon'' contains nothing but [[WordSaladTitle word salad Engrish]]. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RRarXcOu5lQ&feature=related See for yourself.]]
** The carries on into the sequels, of course.
* In the Japanese version of ''VideoGame/TalesOfVesperia'', villain Yeager speaks in a rather peculiar manner, randomly interjecting English words and phrases where Japanese would have sufficed, such as "Come on, boy!", and "Oh my god...". Naturally, his manner of speaking was completely changed in the English dub ...into GratuitousGerman!
** Karol has a somewhat unusual case in that the names of his arts in the Japanese dub are half Japanese and half English in their pronunciation (Examples being Houshuu Thunder and Kasshin Heal Stamp), perhaps to reflect his childish nature.
** In the Japanese ''VideoGame/TalesOfSymphonia'', two of the ''main characters'' were named in GratuitousEnglish: the [[WhiteMage healer]] was named Refill, and [[SquishyWizard her brilliant little brother]] was named Genius. These were thankfully changed to Raine and Genis for the English translation, although [[SpellMyNameWithAnS some fans use them anyway.]]
-->''There once was a young elf named Genius''\\
''Whose English name was God's gift to limerick writers...''
** Any ''Tales Of'' game will feature this, for this reason: While most weapon techniques are three-to-five kanji compounds, spells are generally named in English. Now remember that the series has had voice acting since the beginning, and, well... ''faastueido!'' ''fiafurufurea!'' ''shirufu!'' And for the exceptions who have their tech names in GratuitousEnglish, this applies again. There are also a few examples of GratuitousFrench and GratuitousGerman techs, as well.
* The [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WLlICXBqWI opening video]] of the [[UtsuGe videogame]] ''DoteUpACat'' is totally Engrish.
* In the ''VideoGame/SengokuBasara'' series, UsefulNotes/DateMasamune frequently uses heavily-accented English phrases whenever it's time to kick ass in the original Japanese version, [[CatchPhrase you see?]]
** Also happens in the [[AnimeOfTheGame anime]] adaptation. [[MemeticMutation PUT YA GUNS ON!]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QfmijD2XaqM BURNING UP!!]]
** The intro to the North American release of the third game has the same intro song from the original sung completely in English. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r4upHp9aCQU It's something to behold.]]
* The ''ShinMegamiTenseiPersona'' games have a weird relationship with this trope:
** ''VideoGame/{{Persona 2}}'' features the famous "LET'S POSITIVE THINKING!"
** ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'' and ''[[VideoGame/{{Persona 4}} 4]]'' however, feature much gratuitous English in almost all their vocal songs, most notably the intro screens and battle music... except it's surprisingly good. There are plenty of parts where words are misemphasized or mispronounced, but if you know what they're trying to say, it actually makes sense.
** The slogan for Junes in ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'' is the nonsensical "Everyday younglife Junes", which was changed in the English translation to something that makes a little more sense.
** In ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'', Mitsuru calls this trope on pretty much every scene where she's in. It was changed into GratuitousFrench on the American release. [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] by Junpei:
--> '''Mitsuru:''' Tres bien.
--> '''Junpei:''' [[http://lparchive.org/Persona-3/Update%2015/37-Persona3-13-140.jpg Tray Ben...? What's that mean?]] [[http://lparchive.org/Persona-3/Update%2015/38-Persona3-13-141.jpg That's not english, is it?]]
** Speaking of Persona, ''VideoGame/Persona4DancingAllNight''[='s=] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=91r1STWZc9I trailer]] features some of the most hilarious and excited-sounding broken English you'll ever hear.
--> "Could you imagine the step? He's GENIUS!"
* In the [[NoExportForYou Japan-only]] ''TetrisTheGrandMaster 3'', if your game ends prematurely in Master or Shirase mode...
--> "'''EXCELLENT''' -- but...let's go better next time"
* Arcade game ''VideoGame/TwinkleStarSprites'' starts off with a shout of "TUWINKERU SUTAH SPURAITO".
** Which isn't all that bad, but there are characters named Load Ran and Really Till.
* A number of the songs from ''KatamariDamacy'' are loaded with GratuitousEnglish, including the TitleThemeTune "Katamari On the Rocks" ("Don't Worry, Do Your Best / Picnic kibun Feels So Good / Suteki na Afternoon / Furachi no Midnight, Yeah!") and "Song for the King of Kings" from ''We Love Katamari'' ("Everyday, Everynight / Kimi to ousama no Rainbow, Yes!")
** Although, since this is ''[[WidgetSeries Katamari]]'' we're talking about, it sorta makes sense.
* The voice clips in the American versions of ''VideoGame/CookingMama'' are ''entirely'' this, ranging from simple stilted-sounding R/L inversion ("Look, a swarrowtail butterfry!" in ''Gardening Mama'') to more awkward sounding phrases ("DON-TUH WARRY, MAMA WILL FEEX EET" and "WUNDAFAH! EVEN BEDDAZEN MAMA!" in ''Dinner With Friends'')
** ''Cooking Mama 2'' has "Great! Yuu gayvid yua best effah!" ("Great! You gave it your best effort!") "Don warri, Mama will fix zis" and "Triffic! Even bettah zan Mama!"
** DO NOT MIND
* Averted by ''KnightsInTheNightmare''. The Japanese version is fully voice acted in ''English'', and while the delivery is often highly enunciated for the Japanese audience, leading to alternate [[LargeHam cheese and ham]], it's still good English with a good accent. Atlus even saw fit to leave it in during localization, probably for the occasional NarmCharm.
** Sadly, this only holds true for the voice acting. The Japanese version of the game also featured a lot of English text, including such instant classics as "How to Reinforce Least Knight" and "Touch the Box to Be Defeated Enemy".
* The item shop in ''TearsToTiara'' is called "[[TheFairFolk The Good Folk]]" and is run by an HonestJohn of an Elf.
* "[[VideoGame/{{Mother3}} Welcome to MOTHER3 World]]." Also, the voice clip played when you name your characters is [[ShigesatoItoi Itoi himself]] saying, "OK desu ka?" (Is this OK?) According to Itoi, he was tricked into saying it by Hirokazu Tanaka (who had a tape recorder behind his back).
* The attack names in ''EternalSonata'' are mostly in gratuitous English (Even on the English language track, which just has the English voice actors say the original phrase), with Chopin getting lines in gratuitous French and Italian. Fortunately they make a reasonable amount of sense.
* ''Gunbird'': "Ganbahdo!"
* In the PS game "Speed Power Gunbike," the game over screen happily informs you that "Anergy empty! You all over!"
* In the Japanese versions of ''VisualNovel/{{Snatcher}}'', JUNKER was originally an acronym for "Judgement Uninfected Naked-Kind Execute Ranger".
* The MSX version of ''VideoGame/MetalGear'' gave us such well named villains such as the "Shoot Gunner" and "Coward Duck". The sequel, ''VideoGame/MetalGear2SolidSnake'', isn't much better with the likes of "Black Color", "Ultrabox" (named after the NewWaveMusic band Ultravox) and "Night Sight".
** "Black Color" was supposed to be "Literature/{{Blackcollar}}", after a novel about [[NinjaPirateZombieRobot NASA ninjas (essentially)]]. He is one... supposedly.
*** But the point is that "Black Color" was how the name was spelled in the actual game itself. Many people assume its a [[{{Misblamed}} misromanization]] by the fan-translators, but that's how it was spelled in the actual Japanese game (all the bosses had their names spelled in roman script).
* ''VideoGame/BlazingStar'', and it's [[MemeticMutation memetic]] "YOU FAIL IT! YOUR SKILL IS NOT ENOUGH" screen. Then there's the female announcer who yells English phrases such as "BONUS!" with hilarious results.
* [[http://www.softnyx.com/Gunbound/Introduction.aspx tee hee]], over 1000 rules of game.
* This is more or less the mode of international communications in ''[[ERepublik [=eRepublik=]]]''.
* EXEC_CUTYPUMP/. from ''VideoGame/ArTonelico3'' is a strange mixture of Japanese and English.
* The ''StarrySky'' series. [[http://blog.eientei.net/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/Engrish-640x480.png This is just a sample]].
* Lampshaded in ''Videogame/TheSimpsonsGame'', which features a level parodying Japanese {{RPG}}s entitled [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ccIft11y4IU Big Super Happy Fun Fun]].
* The very name ''Franchise/DonkeyKong'' is perhaps the most famous example of this trope.
* In the French version of ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'', one can hear the Spy scream, "Oh my God", in English as part of his Jarate responses. What makes this strange is that he says that phrase in French in the original English version (and all of the other languages the game was dubbed in), suggesting an attempt to KeepItForeign.
* From ''[[VideoGame/DonPachi DoDonPachi DaiFukkatsu Black Label]]''[='=]s Arrange mode: "Just a couple more shots ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0NCVnX7EjSk&t=2m16s desu]]!''"
* The [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vu3PDxoWj_E Japanese version]] of the "Cheer Readers" game from ''VideoGame/RhythmHeaven Fever'' includes such lines as "OK, don't mind!" and "Let's everybody go!"
* Very prevalent in the Japanese dub of ''VideoGame/{{Xenoblade}}'' while the characters are [[CallingYourAttacks calling their attacks]]. Only Dunban and Riki are exempt from this, due to having Japanese art names.
* Misha's "Bush Cheney 2004" shirt from ''VisualNovel/KatawaShoujo'' is probably meant to parody this trope.
* This is fairly common in the song lyrics in ''{{Deardrops}}'' and ''VisualNovel/KiraKira''. It's pointed out that some of the band members have no idea what they actually mean.
* The names of Aether Relics in ''VideoGame/DuelSaviorDestiny'' are frequently in gratuitous English and have little real meaning. For example, the sword Traitor is perfectly faithful to Taiga. [[spoiler:Though Traitor is actually the subversion of this trend of the name meaning nothing: Traitor is rebelling against ''[[GodIsEvil God.]]'']]
* In ''VideoGame/WayOfTheSamurai 4'', members of the British faction sometimes speak in heavily-accented Engrish. Of particular note are the photographers, who act as your {{Save Point}}s in the game, and speak to you in broken English ("Hold still unmoving, please!"), somewhat justified by the language barrier between your samurai and the British nationals (until the language school opens up, most of the other foreigners [[TheUnintelligible won't be able to understand you at all]]).
* Aside from the title itself, ''VideoGame/TimeGal'' gives us "STOPPU!" Time Gal yells this whenever a Time Stop is performed. The very last time this is done in the game, she yells out the whole phrase, minus the extra syllable.
--> TIIIIIIIIIIIIIIME STOP!
* PlayedWith in ''VisualNovel/LittleBusters'': [[ButNotTooForeign Kud]] is a foreigner who is constantly speaking in broken English... because it isn't her first language and she's really, really terrible at it, so she uses every opportunity she can get to practice it. For a straighter example, Komari speaks in English for a couple of her battle phrases, though her pronunciation is much better.
* [[http://www.capcom.co.jp/gyakutensaiban/5/trial/index.html The demo]] for ''PhoenixWrightAceAttorney: Dual Destinies'' (it's still in Japanese, by the way) has Athena giving out "Let's do this!" near the beginning.
* Some Nintendo-developed game with voiced cutscenes will have ''only'' English voice acting, even in the original Japanese release. A great example can be found in the intro cinematic of ''Pikmin 3'', which is entirely in English, with added Japanese subtitles.
** "[[VideoGame/SuperMetroid The last Metroid is in captivity. The galaxy is at peace.]]"
* One of the clues in the first murder case in ''VisualNovel/DanganRonpa'' made the identity of the killer extremely obvious to English-speakers from the get-go. [[spoiler: The victim wrote "LEON" (for Leon Kuwata) in english upside-down behind her before dying. Because all the characters involved are Japanese high-school students, though, most of them thought it was the number 11037.]]
* The Japanese version of VideoGame/TeamFortress2 keeps the English names for the player classes, thus, turning their names into this trope. In addition, only the interface's translated - the voice acting stays in English (at least by default).
* The WarWasBeginning intro screens for ''Great VideoGame/MahouDaisakusen'' have English captions in massive screaming letters, subtitled in much smaller Japanese.
-->"ARE YOU GREAT? WE ARE GREAT!"
* ''Last Breakers'', a PC98 doujin ShootEmUp, has this Engrish text in the intro sequence:
-->AMBITION OF ASTROGATER OBSTRUCT\\
SALLY OUT WAS BREAKERS\\
FOR PROTECT OUR PLANET\\
\\
BEGINING OF FIGHT\\
DO NOT RUN TO ESCAPE\\
GOOD LUCK!
* The entirety of "Space Merry-Go-Round" from the lesser known {{Bemani}} arcade game ''Toy's March''.
--> Is such big merry-go-round seen until now? On which does it ride? On which do you ride? Riding and moving on the Earth...
* ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'': Several of the first generation mons' Japanese names are simply English words, like Spear (Beedrill), Fire, Thunder and Freezer (Respectively Moltres, Zapdos and Articuno), or Sleep and Sleeper (Drowzee and Hypno).
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