* There has been criticism of the film that many of the female characters, especially the female characters in the 1920s, seem to fawn over Gil and constantly go on about how great a writer he is (even though what we hear Gertrude Stein read aloud is...OK at best). But if you interpret Gil's travels into the 1920s as at least partially his fantasy, it makes perfect sense that he would imagine himself to be well-liked and fawned over by his idols. He's basically living in his own personal MarySue fanfic, except instead of being winding up in Rivendell and being added as a tenth member of the Fellowship, or being sorted into Gryffindor and becoming BFFs with Harry, Ron and Hermione, he's showing up in Paris and becoming besties with all the great writers of the 20s.