[[quoteright:213:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Sybok.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:213:Now for the low, low price of your starship!]]
->"''The Enterprise is back. This time, have they [[HilariousInHindsight gone too far]]?''"
-->-- The film's tagline.

->"''Why are seat belts being installed in movie theatres this summer?''"
-->-- Paramount teaser ad intended to refer to the movie's fast pace, [[IThoughtItMeant not to]] [[AnythingButThat being strapped in and forced to watch the flick]].

'''''Star Trek V: The Final Frontier''''' is the fifth movie in the ''Franchise/StarTrek'' film series, released in 1989.

They've [[Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture stared at V'Ger]], [[Film/StarTrekIITheWrathOfKhan defeated Khan]], [[Film/StarTrekIIITheSearchForSpock found Spock]] and [[Film/StarTrekIVTheVoyageHome saved the whales]]. But can the ''Enterprise'' crew survive their greatest challenge yet? Creator/WilliamShatner! ... [[DramaticPause In!]] ... [[DirectedByCastMember The director's seat!]]

With a brand-new ''Enterprise'', Kirk and crew set out to resolve a hostage situation only to discover that they've been suckered as part of a grander scheme. Who's behind it? Why Spock's [[LongLostRelative long-lost half-brother Sybok]], of course! Sybok commandeers the ''Enterprise'', winning over most of the crew by using his [[{{Telepathy}} telepathic]] {{epiphany therapy}} on them. Failing to realize that there is NoSuchThingAsSpaceJesus, Sybok makes them set a course for the [[ScifiWritersHaveNoSenseOfScale center of the galaxy]], where he believes {{God}} is waiting. With the bulk of his crew now working against him, Kirk must [[DieHardOnAnX John McClane]] his way up the ''Enterprise'' armed with his wits, a pair of rocket boots... and ''Trek's'' very first fart joke.

Now it should be noted the [[{{Misblamed}} movie's failings aren't all Shatner's fault]]. We can also thank ExecutiveMeddling for all the forced "humor" and the [[TVStrikes 1988 WGA strike]] for short-circuiting the screenwriting, and the infamous SpecialEffectFailure was due to [=ILM=] being too busy [[Film/GhostbustersII with]] [[Film/TheAbyss a]] [[Film/BackToTheFuture few]] [[Film/{{Willow}} other]] [[Film/IndianaJonesAndTheLastCrusade projects]] to work on the film.

Still, the basic concept ''was'' Shatner's idea(although making Sybok Spock's brother was a Harve Bennett decision), and he knew about the studio's humor requirements before he even began work. Gene Roddenberry himself had expressed strong reservations about the pitch; he had good reason to be concerned, as he had previously written [[http://www.well.com/~sjroby/godthing.html his own story]] about the crew meeting God and hated the result. (Though it should also be noted that Roddenberry's own counteroffered idea was, as it had been since the second movie, for the ''Enterprise'' crew to go back in time and either stop or commit the JFK assassination.) But Shatner persisted with the idea of [[UltimateShowdownOfUltimateDestiny Kirk coming up against God and winning]]. ''Franchise/StarTrek'' and religious topics have always been uneasy bedfellows; ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'' is the only series to pull it off, and Trekkies [[BrokenBase are divided]] on even that. Nevertheless, [[FanonDiscontinuity fans prefer to ignore this entry entirely]] and simply go from the fourth movie directly to the [[Film/StarTrekVITheUndiscoveredCountry sixth]]. ''Frontier'' is also the only one of the original films to have never been given a DirectorsCut; Shatner has always wanted to do it, but Paramount refuses to let him.

This movie isn't a total write-off, though: ''Star Trek V'' also features plenty of CharacterDevelopment scenes between Kirk, Spock, and [=McCoy=] (the {{book ends}} with the three camping are quite enjoyable), an absolutely ''brilliant'' backstory scene involving [=McCoy=] and his father, and has a collection of well imagined individual sequences such as ComingInHot with a shuttlecraft; general consensus is that while Shatner's storytelling abilities might be a bit on the weak side, he certainly had an eye for good setpieces.
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!!Tropes seen in ''The Final Frontier'' include:
* AgentMulder & AgentScully: Sybok and Kirk, respectively. [=McCoy=] goes from Scully to Mulder when they meet "God" and back to Scully when "God" starts being a dick.
* TheAlcatraz: Spock proclaims the brig to be escape-proof. As in all things, however, rare is the Alcatraz that can stop escape attempts from both ends.
* AllThereInTheManual: The {{novelization}} by J.M. Dillard does a lot to redeem the movie's IdiotPlot, adding considerable backstory to Sybok and his mother, and explaining that "God" had telepathically sent Sybok a formula for configuring a starship's deflector shields to penetrate the Barrier. After Sybok orders Scotty to set up the ''Enterprise'''s shields in this way, Klaa's Bird-of-Prey copies the same shield configuration in order to follow the ''Enterprise''.
* [[TheAllegedCar The Alleged Ship]]: The Lemonprise. Kirk is nonplussed by his squeaky chair, dodgy transporters, and the defective Log transcriber (which keeps popping open with ridiculous SPRONNG! noises).
* AmazonianBeauty: Vixis. As Chekov put it: "She has vonderful muscles" (by which he meant [[MaleGaze gluteus maximus]]).
* AntiVillain: Sybok is the villain of the movie, but he really isn't a bad guy, just misguided and a little nutty. Klaa could qualify as well, as he isn't malicious, just bored.
* ArmorPiercingQuestion: 'What does {{God}} need with a starship?' Easily one of the most famous examples of this trope.
* ArtistsAreNotArchitects: In one scene, the Enterprise is shown to have about twice as many decks as it could possibly contain, and they are numbered in reverse order for some reason.
** Somewhat explained in the AlternateUniverse StarTrekMyriadUniverses story "The Chimes at Midnight"; Kirk was at one point forced to climb the turbolift-shafts and to count the decks as he passed them, "for they were not labeled on the interior of the shaft, although he noted with annoyance that the designers had elected to number the numerous individual turbolift landing decks--each level having several turbolift stops along its breadth--as he passed a sign misleadingly indicating 'Deck 52.'"
* AssInAmbassador: Inverted, unusually for ''Star Trek''. St. John Talbot and Korrd are not unreasonable people (just incredibly jaded), and Caithlin Dar is downright ''nice'' (a rarity for Romulans, actually...).
** This may be precisely why they are where they are (particularly Korrd, who is both disgraced and disgraceful in his drink): The planet is a dumping ground for anyone in the diplomatic corps of the three powers that the leadership wants to be rid of in a non-permanent way. If they hadn't gotten along, they would have died.
* AttackPatternAlpha: Played with.
* BehindTheBlack: Scotty, after claiming to know the ship like the back of his hand, concusses himself on a bit of bulkhead that sticks out from the wall. Whilst unseen by the audience before impact, Scotty was walking towards the bulkhead and, in fact, was looking right at it when he hit it.
* BigBadEnsemble: Sybok and Klaa are an unusual example in that Sybok isn't really evil per se, and for the most part Klaa is more of an annoyance than anything else.
* BigDamnGunship: Spock, commanding a Klingon Bird of Prey, opens fire on "God" in order to rescue Kirk.
* BigEgoHiddenDepths: Sybok. [[spoiler: Cruelly invoked by "God", who takes the form of Sybok and mocks, "What's the matter? Don't you ''like'' this face? I have so many, but this one suits ''you'' best."]]
* BigNo: SHOOT HIM!!!!
* BookEnds: Camping with the PowerTrio.
* CallBack: Kirk states in the opening that men like himself, Bones and Spock had no families. [[TrueCompanions He later admits]] [[Heartwarming/StarTrekVTheFinalFrontier he was wrong.]]
** His premonition that he'll die alone (and is therefore safe while Spock and [=McCoy=] are there) is also mentioned again.
* CannotTellALie: What Spock claims as proof that Kirk was not aboard the ''Enterprise''. [[ILied He was lying]] about not being able to lie, though he was telling the truth about where Kirk was at.
* CanonDiscontinuity: It's still technically part of the canon, but the events have never been directly referenced in another canonical ''Star Trek'' work again. Rumor has it the writers are specifically told not to as a matter of course. GeneRoddenberry [[WordOfGod said he considered]] some elements of the movie apocryphal, but he apparently never told anyone which ones. Ronald D. Moore, who was working on ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' at the time, has said that while the writers of the show accepted the film as canon, they considered it [[OldShame such an embarrassment]] to the franchise as a whole that they agreed among themselves that they would never reference it on the show, to the extent where the ending of the episode "The Nth Degree" was heavily rewritten simply because they didn't want it to have have anything in common with this film.
** The novels, which are now vetted more thoroughly than they used to be, have featured Sybok exactly twice, both of them in the Myriad Universe novels, which take place entirely in alternate universes.
** The novels have also mentioned the God-like creature at the center of the Great Barrier; in the ''Q Continuum'' trilogy of novels, He referred to Himself as "The One", and was a contemporary of [[BigBad 0]], the Beta XIII-A entity, and Gorgon. The four of them were responsible for the destruction of the Tkon Empire. It is mentioned that pretending to be God and then using the resulting influence to drive civilizations to self-destruction is his entire schtick. In fact, he was imprisoned in the center of the galaxy by the Q for his crimes, while 0 was punished by being thrown out of the galaxy (which was the reason for the galactic barrier as seen in the 2nd ''TOS'' pilot).
** The only real survivor, at least according to the Okudas in the Star Trek Encyclopedia, is Captain Klaa. Who was apparently bumped down for his actions and assigned as a courtroom translator in [[Film/StarTrekVITheUndiscoveredCountry Star Trek VI]]. This was due to a coincidence in that the translator was played by Todd Bryant.
* CardCarryingVillain: All of Klaa's actions are because...he's bored.
* CatchAFallingStar: Spock grabs Kirk by the ankle after he falls off ''El Capitan'' without so much as causing him a bruise.
* CatFolk[=/=]CatGirl: With three breasts. Defeated by Kirk when he throws her into a [[IncrediblyLamePun literal]] ''[[CatsHateWater pool table]]''.
* CerebusSyndrome: The "comedy" disappears and the movie becomes much more serious once they begin their trip to the Great Barrier.
* ChewingTheScenery: In Universe, Chekov seemed to have a little too much fun pretending to be Captain of the Enterprise to distract Sybok while Kirk and Spock are attempting to rescue the hostages.
* ChuckCunninghamSyndrome: Both inverted and possibly played straight. While the obvious inversion is [[RememberTheNewGuy Sybok]], who is revealed to be Spock's half-brother, we later have Kirk note he had a brother once, who he lost and was lucky enough to come back, referring to Spock's resurrection. However, the way Kirk says this sounds like he's forgotten he actually ''did'' have a brother who was lost, (George Kirk Jr), who was killed back in the classic series.
* CircleOfStandingStones: The meeting with "God" takes place in a circle of stones that rise up out of the ground as Kirk and company approach.
* ClimbSlipHangClimb: In the rock-climbing scene.
* ComicBookAdaptation: By DCComics.
* ComingInHot: "[[TimeForPlanB Plan B]]... as in ''Barricade''"
* CrapsackWorld: The Planet of Galactic Peace. As is pointed out by many reviewers (including {{SFDebris}}), Nimbus III neatly scuttles Roddenbery's tenets regarding the future: the planet set aside for the mutual cooperation of three races has fallen into anarchy, the technology of the future has turned to [[UsedFuture rusted crap]], and poverty is still rampant.
-->'''Website/TheAgonyBooth:''' ''Throughout the movie, Nimbus III is referred to periodically as “The Planet of Galactic Peace”, and every time someone says it, you can actually hear the [[SarcasmMode Quotes of Bitter Contempt]]. Peace! [[SpitefulSpit Ptooey]].''
** Ironically, one could argue that it ''succeeded'' in establishing galactic peace... as the various ambassadors are either too drunk to bother fighting each other or have grown united in their shared hatred for their ''own'' governments for [[ReassignedToAntarctica assigning them there!]]
* CreatorCameo: Harve Bennett sends Kirk off to investigate.
* CulturalRebel: Sybok, who is definitely the most emotional Vulcan we've ever seen.
* CustomUniform: Each of the PowerTrio is given an alternative uniform, which looks not unlike a grey pullover/sweatshirt. Captain Kirk is also seen in a "Captain's Jacket" at one point, underneath which he wears a white t-shirt bearing the slogan "Go Climb A Rock".
* {{Darker and Edgier}}: Shatner wanted to depict an edgier future, so we got a desolate city named "Paradise", a barely functioning Enterprise, and the Star Trek Universe's first ([[Series/StarTrekEnterprise but not the last]], alas) fart joke. Wow.
** Shatner was also (reportedly) never thrilled with Roddenberry's idea of a perfect future, so he had those elements to show a more "realistic" future.
* DeathFromAbove: Kirk calls down some Close Air Support from the Enterprise in order to try and cover his escape from "God". While a photon torpedo ''should'' have been quite a bit more powerful than shown, it was still cool.
* DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu: Or, in this case, shoot a SufficientlyAdvancedAlien posing as deity with a torpedo and then a disruptor cannon. Yes, Spock did.
* DistractedByTheSexy: In-universe, anyway; clearly someone failed to point out viewers might not see it the same. Uhura does her infamous nude fan dance to distract some mooks so that the Starfleet team can capture them and steal their alien horses. (It was in the dark, and they spotted her from a distance, so it could be excusable in that context.)
* [[DontCallMeSir Don't Call Me Captain]]: During the camping trip, Kirk asks Spock to call him Jim, reminding him that they're off duty.
* EldritchAbomination: It's never explicitly stated just what exactly the "God" is, but it's clearly an example of this trope.
* EpiphanyTherapy
* EveryoneKnowsMorse: Justified, as Starfleet is one part military, and Morse Code could be part of their training.
* ExecutiveMeddling: Paramount forced Shatner to up the film's comedy quotient due to the previous film's success in that area. This results in severe {{Mood Whiplash}} between a grand, epic story about the search for God and slapstick farce.
* FakeStatic: Done twice, once [[RuleOfFunny for laughs]] when Chekov pretends that there is a blizzard to avoid admitting he's lost, and once [[RuleOfDrama for drama]] when the ''Enterprise'' broadcasts static to delay talking to Sybok.
* FalseInnocenceTrick: The Enterprise passes through the barrier around the heart of the galaxy and finds the legendary planet Sha Ka Ree, believed to be the home of God. When the protagonists find God he's apparently imprisoned there, and tries to trick them into helping him escape. A subversion, because Kirk figures out there's something funny going on and manages to get "God" to reveal his true evil nature before he gets away.
* FanDisservice: 57 year old Nichelle Nichols doing a nude fan dance. And bizarrely, all evidence is that Shatner genuinely thought this would be plain old {{Fanservice}}.
* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: Literally, and proving that the ''Enterprise'' DOES have toilets. Just before Scotty's jailbreak, look at the stencil on the "chair" Kirk is sitting on. "WARNING: DO NOT USE WHILE IN SPACEDOCK".
* GettingSmiliesPaintedOnYourSoul: Sybok's telepathy, which makes everyone he "treats" euphoric and immediately ready to join his cause.
* AGodAmI: "One voice, many faces."
* GodIsEvil: Well, it's not really ''our'' God as we know him but it's certainly evil.
* GodTest
* GlowingEyesOfDoom
* HeroicSacrifice: Sybok, when he tries to mind meld with "God" so the others can escape.
* HeroOfAnotherStory: St. John Talbot, Caithlin Dar, and even Sybok, as Creator/RogerEbert points out in [[http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/star-trek-v-the-final-frontier-1989 his review]].
-->Another irritation is the way in which we meet apparently major characters [...] who are introduced with fanfares of dialogue and then never developed or given anything to do. The entire movie seems crowded with loose ends, overlooked developments and forgotten characters, and there are little snatches of dialogue where some of these minor characters seem to be soldiering on in their original subplots as if unaware that they've been cut from the movie.
* HollywoodToneDeaf: Of the three schlubs failing to sing "Row, Row, Row Your Boat" in sync, Kelley's singing got him into acting, Nimoy [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonard_Nimoy_discography recorded a few albums]], and... [[WilliamShatner oh]]. Well, okay, ''one'' of them has an excuse. At least Spock is in tune.
* [[HorseOfADifferentColor Horse With A Plastic Horn Glued To Its Face]]
* HurricaneOfPuns: "I do not believe you realize the gravity of your situation," "I've always wanted to play to a captive audience," etc.
* IHaveManyNames: As the alien claims "One voice, many faces". The planet is supposedly a location common to all mythologies as well.
* InventionalWisdom: The "System Failure" light on Kirk's logbook.
* ItsAllMyFault: Invoked verbatim by Sybok, leading to his HeroicSacrifice.
* [[JetPack Jet Boots]]
* KickTheDog: Klaa shoots down Earth's first deep space probe.
* KillHimAlready: Kirk pulls this on Spock with Sybok, until he finds out that the two are half-brothers.
* LivingProp: The Space Marines during the rescue attempt.
* LongLostRelative: Sybok.
* ManHug: Subverted. After Spock [[DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu saves him from a]] SufficientlyAdvancedAlien, Kirk is about to hug him when Spock says quietly, "Please, Captain, not in front of the Klingons."
* MercyKill: Bones relives one of his most painful moments, [[spoiler: where his father is dying and suffering from an incurable disease. He begs Bones to stop treatment so that he can finally die. Bones does so, and mere months later a cure for his father's disease was discovered.]]
* MinorCrimeRevealsMajorPlot: A routine hostage situation turns out to be an attempt to hijack a starship.
* MoodWhiplash: {{Executive Meddling}} insisted that the film include more comedy after that worked so well in the previous film. Unfortunately, the story here is rather less appropriate for it, resulting in the mood careening wildly between Big Important Events and broad slapstick.
* MoreThanMindControl: Anyone who is "helped" by Sybok tends to follow him around like a puppet.
* {{Multiboobage}}: The [[IncrediblyLamePun Cat Dancer]].
* MythologyGag: The shuttle's name ''Galileo'' as well the script it is written by on the ship.
* NobodyPoops: Averted, at very least whenever the ''Enterprise'' is not in spacedock.
* NoOneGetsLeftBehind: Kirk orders [=McCoy=] and Spock to beam out first when the transporter conveniently can only beam up two at a time. [=McCoy=] calls BS on this mid-beam.
* TheNoseKnows: In the turbolift as Kirk and crew return from their camping trip.
-->'''Kirk:''' I could use a shower.\\
'''Spock:''' Yes.
* NoSell: When Sybok tries to take away Spock's pain, Spock calmly explains that he has already dealt with that pain, so Sybok cannot use it against him. Kirk just outright refuses, while Bones holds greater loyalty to his friends than Sybok even after Sybok does it to him.
* NoSuchThingAsSpaceJesus
* NotSoDifferent: For all his talk of rejecting the Vulcan way, Sybok essentially brainwashes people into suppressing their traumatic memories, denying them the chance to deal with their pain. Overall, how this ''any'' different than Vulcans suppressing their emotions?!
** On the contrary, he forces people to bring old pain they've repressed out into the open. "By making you face your pain and draw strength from it. Once that's done, fear cannot stop you." It's no wonder the Vulcans exiled him; on a planet full of Tuvoks, he must have been like a Neelix running around trying to get everyone to emote.
* NotTheFallThatKillsYou: Kirk falls several thousand feet down El Capitan only to be caught by Spock about a foot away from the ground. Cue to Kirk humorously trying to shield himself with his hands against the rocks that are mere inches below him.
* OhCrap:
** The morse scene:
--->"Stand back?" *{{beat}}* "Stand back!" *BOOM*
* TheOnlyOne: A twofer. As well as Kirk being supposedly the best person to send in for hostage negotiations, the ''Enterprise'' is apparently the ''only'' ship available to take him to Paradise. That's despite Kirk starting on Earth, home of one of Star Fleet's largest bases, and ''Enterprise'''s construction not actually being finished.
* PathOfInspiration: Sybok's offer of internal peace.
* PillarOfLight: How "God" first appears.
* PlotInducedStupidity
** Sending a barely functioning, untested ship into a hostage situation when it doesn't even have functioning transporters. A {{hand wave}} was attempted by saying there were other ships around, but only Kirk had the experience. By that logic, they could have just sent a working ship to ''meet'' Kirk. Even ''Kirk'' thinks the reasoning is bullshit. Then again, [[WhatCouldPossiblyGoWrong it's just a hostage negotiation]].
** Also, Sybok's plan to get a starship is overly complicated than just using his pain power to work his way up the Federation chain-of-command to get an admiral to simply lend him a ship and crew.
*** Explainable in light of the apparently small stakes: three hostages, only one a Federation citizen, an apparently insignificant one exiled to a job he hates on a "worthless lump of rock." It's a job for a ship with nothing important to do. ''Enterprise'' is the most expendable ship at the moment, and Admiral Bill's comments to Kirk are obvious flattery.
*** Bear in mind that Sybok and everyone else is stuck on Nimbus III. There are ''no'' ships and only a few settlements. Its likely that he'd been living on the planet for some time (given he's a TechnicalPacifist, he probably went there when it was first made into a "neutral planet" that was supposed to bring the Romulans, the Klingons and the Federation together), and he only started having his visions from "God" after he was already stuck there. So getting off the planet would be just as tricky as getting an advanced ship, so he might as well kill two birds with one stone.
* ThePollyanna: You just get that vibe from Caithlin Dar. She's young, sweet natured, and extremely naive. She contrasts her Human and Klingon counterparts, who are older, more cynical and really stopped giving a damn.
* ThePowerOfFriendship: (or ThePowerOfLove if you [[HoYay so desire]]) Refusing to desert Kirk is what keeps Spock and [=McCoy=] from being brainwashed by Sybok.
* PowerTrio: Kirk, Spock, and [=McCoy=], obviously. Notable as, while an important part of all of the movies and the show, this movie focuses on them as a trio more than any of the other movies.
* PragmaticAdaptation: The comic book cuts a number of the more embarrassing moments from the storyline.
* PrecisionFStrike: One of the only times that Spock gets genuinely angry(even if only momentarily), and also goes to show the depth of his feelings toward Kirk.
-->'''Spock:''' General, I require your assistance.\\
'''General Korrd:''' My assistance?\\
'''Spock:''' You ''are'' his superior officer.\\
'''Korrd:''' I am a foolish old man.\\
'''Spock:''' ''Damn'' you, sir, you '''will''' try.
* PulledFromYourDayOff: The opening has the main characters called back from their vacation in order to deal with a hostage situation on another planet.
* ReassignedToAntarctica: The three ambassadors on Nimbus III (the reasons are noted in the novelization).
* RedemptionEqualsDeath: [[spoiler:Sybok]]'s remaining lifespan goes down to about 15 seconds once he [[TheAtoner realizes the error of his ways]].
* [[RenegadeSplinterFaction Renegade Klingon]]: Captain Klaa. He decides to go Nimbus III not to save the hostages, but to ''fight the rescue ship the Federation is sending''. When he learns it's Kirk being sent, it only makes him more eager to attack. [[spoiler: It's only when General Koord steps in that Klaa appoligizes for his unauthorized aggression.]]
* ScifiWritersHaveNoSenseOfScale: At least they didn't go with Shatner's original idea of going to the ''center of the universe''.
** Not necessarily an example of the trope. Ships were a lot faster in the original series and other movies set in the same time frame than they were in later material. They could travel to the edge of the galaxy and back in a very small amount of time or map every gas anomaly in the Beta Quadrant in a few months. In the animated series they even visited the center of the galaxy and met Satan.
** Also, the Pioneer probe blown up by the Klingons had been traveling at only a tiny fraction of lightspeed from Earth for 300 years, meaning the Klingons would have to be pretty deep within Federation space to encounter it. Of course, these Klingons were explicitly looking for a fight, so it's not unreasonable that they ''were'' deep in Federation space.
* [[ScrewedByTheNetwork Screwed by the Studio]]: Retroactively. While all the other TOS-era films were given "Directors Cut" reedits and re-releases, any of which allowed the directors to make improvements, William Shatner was famously denied the opportunity to put right this film with a Director's Cut, even though of all six original films, it was the one that needed fixing the most.
* ScottyTime: Inverted. When Kirk beams up to an ''Enterprise'' falling apart, Scotty says "You may have given me ''too much'' time, Captain."
* SealedEvilInACan: [[spoiler:"God"]]. He claimed to have been imprisoned [[spoiler:on the planet in the center of the galaxy]] and wanted to [[spoiler:"join" with the ''Enterprise'']] so he could escape.
* ShoutOut: One of the names of the planet where they find "God", Sha Kaa Ree, comes from SeanConnery's name. It's also a DevelopmentGag (see WhatCouldHaveBeen).
* ShowSomeLeg: Uhura doing the previously mentioned fan dance.
* SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism: As [[http://www.agonybooth.com/recaps/Star_Trek_V__The_Final_Frontier_1989.aspx some]] pointed out, "Star Trek as a franchise had, up to this point, been entirely devoted to an optimistic future of interplanetary peace, technological advancement, and human brotherhood. Star Trek V, on the other hand, is a deeply cynical movie," with the CrapsackWorld on which it begins, the unreliable technology and the phony God that emerges at the ending as examples of this.
* SpaceMarine: A squad is seen on the shuttle. [[LivingProp They do nothing and say nothing.]]
* StealthPun: During the infamous CatGirl bar scene, a Klingon, a Romulan and a Human walk into a bar....
* StockFootage: See above.
* StuffBlowingUp: A real-life example, not just in the movie. Because they were filming during a union strike, one of the production's trucks "mysteriously" blew up.
* SufficientlyAdvancedAlien: The being they meet on the other side of the barrier.
* ThatWasNotADream: "I dreamt that a madman had taken over the ''Enterprise''!"
* "TheyDontMakeThemLikeTheyUsedTo," Scotty says of ''Enterprise''-A.
* TimeForPlanB
* TrueCompanions: [[TheKirk Kirk]], [[TheSpock Spock]], and [[TheMcCoy McCoy]], are this, naturally, but the movie takes it UpToEleven. A redeeming quality of the movie is the focus on this trope, and the bond between these three.
-->'''[=McCoy=]:''' I thought you said men like us didn't have families.\\
'''Kirk:''' Maybe I was wrong.
* {{Understatement}}: "I imagine the Klingons will be quite angry." [[LampshadeHanging Pointed out]] as such by Chekov, who estimates that they will be irritated enough to level the whole planet.
* UnresolvedSexualTension: Implied to be between Uhura and Scotty.
* VillainousBreakdown: After having been blasted with a photon torpedo, "God" come out of it as this [[{{Narm}} rather goofy]] distorted face exclaiming '''''"[[YouExclamation YOOOOOUUUUU!]]"''''' while floating after Kirk. This is because the ending had to be radically changed, and they couldn't afford to get the actor back to record any new material.
* WellIntentionedExtremist: Probably the saddest thing about Sybok is that he's sincere. He honestly wants to help people, he honestly wants to do good, and he actually stands up to what he believes is God to demand to know why his "friends" are being hurt. He also avoids taking lives if possible, and (in his own estimation) helps others by making them confront their pain. And while he ''is'' endangering lives, he isn't aware of that, and tries to minimize damage where he can.
* WideEyedIdealist: Caithlin Dar actually wants to realize the dream of the Planet of Galactic Peace. A year or two there probably would have left her as jaded as her counterparts.
* WatchItForTheMeme: Sybok's 'I couldn't help but notice your pain' (said when he encounters 'God') found its way into a [[TupacShakur 2Pac]] song.
* WhatCouldHaveBeen: SeanConnery was originally approached to play Sybok. He declined, but as a DevelopmentGag the planet Sha-Ka-Ree was named in his honor.
* WretchedHive: Nimbus III is a godawful hellhole.
* WhatTheHellHero: [=McCoy=], of all people defends Spock when Kirk bawls him out for not shooting Sybok. This, of course, comes after he jokingly offers to "hold him" when Kirk threatens to knock him on his ass.
* YouLookFamiliar: David Warner, again.
* YoureInsane: Kirk tells this to Sybok, who replies "Am I?", apparently genuinely considering it.
* YouWouldntShootMe: Spock holds Sybok at gunpoint once they reach the ''Enterprise'', but Sybok refuses to surrender, instead just walking up and taking the gun. He does admit to being worried that Spock might actually have done it, though.
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