[[quoteright:254:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/MoneyBallFilmPoster_2115.jpg]]
''Moneyball'' is a 2011 American film based on the best-selling book of the same name, following the RealLife story of Billy Beane.

Billy goes through a bit of a depression after a post season loss to the New York Yankees as he realizes that with his ballclub's meager salary, they just can't compete with the likes of teams that spend three times the amount of money they can. Destiny along with the Cleveland Indians put Billy together with Peter Brand as they start using Bill James-style statistics (aka: Sabermetrics) to rebuild the Oakland Athletics into a League powerhouse once again.

The film stars Creator/BradPitt and Jonah Hill; Creator/AaronSorkin served as a co-writer of the movie's screenplay. The movie was nominated for six Academy Awards: Best Picture, Actor, Supporting Actor, Adapted Screenplay, Editing and Sound Mixing.

----
!!Tropes in ''Moneyball'':
* AdaptationalAttractiveness: The real Billy Beane is not an unattractive man, but he's no Brad Pitt.
* AffectionateParody: A fake trailer was posted for "Too Much Moneyball" featuring the 2009 Yankees and their buying a World Series.
* AmicablyDivorced: Billy and Sharon don't bicker or argue as much as one might expect given the situation.
* AnachronismStew: Billy's daughter sings him Lenka's "The Show" in a scene set six years before it was recorded.
* ArtisticLicense: A couple of main points of drama deviate from real-life:
** Carlos Pena is portrayed as a roadblock for Scott Hatteberg in the film, but had already been demoted to the minors by the time he was traded in real life with Hatteberg firmly entrenched as the starter (and also sporting an above-average fielding percentage). Hatteberg has also said Howe was actually his biggest supporter.
** Beane "shakes things up" by trading Jeremy Giambi and Carlos Pena on the same day; they were traded a month apart in reality.
** Chad Bradford and Jeremy Giambi are depicted as risky newcomers to plug the holes on the roster; in reality, they were already on the team the previous season leading into the 2002 season depicted in the film.
** The film makes no mention of the A's biggest strength that allowed them to compete with the slugging American League teams: their tremendous starting pitching, featuring three young frontline starters drafted by Beane, with the film focusing instead on the patchwork offense. They also had both the 2002 AL Cy Young award winner (Barry Zito) ''and'' AL MVP (Miguel Tejada). See DemotedToExtra below.
** It's nighttime when the final out of the Division Series is made. The real game was played in the afternoon and ended well before dark.
* BasedOnATrueStory: One could argue {{Very Loosely|BasedOnATrueStory}}. While the on-field results and details of player transactions are mostly accurate, there is a fair bit of rearranging of characters and lines, including the complete omission of Michael Lewis (the author of the original book), and a number of people who claim they were portrayed unfairly, particularly Art Howe.
* BeleagueredAssistant: Peter Brand gets colored this way, but it's mainly just him learning the ropes.
* BitterSweetEnding: The A's go on an unprecedented 20-game win streak (setting an American League record) but lose in the playoffs. Billy is offered a 12.5-million dollar contract the highest offered for a baseball GM at that time to GM for the Red Sox and seriously considers it but ultimately decides to stay with the A's, content to know that he's changed the game for the better.
* BrokenStreak: Averted. The A's go up 11-0 on the Royals and look like they'll cruise to their record 20th straight victory. The Royals gradually chip away at the lead and manage to tie the game 11-11... and then the A's Scott Hatteberg hits a walk-off home run in the 9th inning. (This scene is [[TruthInTelevision historically accurate]].)
* BoringButPractical: The various players that Beane wants on the team, in spite of their various faults, simply because they can get on base reliably.
* BunnyEarsLawyer: The players chosen have flaws but are still good enough at what they do to be good.
* TheCameo: Bobby Kotick of Activision/Blizzard as team owner Stephen Schott.
* CompositeCharacter: Peter Brand was based on a group of Beane's assistants/deputies, primarily Paul [=DePodesta=], whose request not to have his name used in the film is what partially led to this.
** When director Creator/StevenSoderbergh was attached to direct, [=DePodesta=] was one of the characters. Creator/DemetriMartin was to have played him but production was shut down a few days in.
* DaddysGirl: Casey Beane and her adorable song where she repeatedly calls her father a loser.
* DeadpanSnarker: Coach Ron Washington in the scene where Billy offers Scott Hatteberg a contract with the idea of putting him at first base, a position Hatteberg had never played:
-->'''Beane''': [First base] is not that hard, Scott. Tell him, Wash.
-->'''Washington''': It's incredibly hard.
-->'''Hatteberg''': I'm taking Giambi's spot at first? What about the fans?
-->'''Washington''': Yeah, maybe I can teach one of them how to play first base.
* DemotedToExtra: The biggest strength of the winning early-2000's Oakland A's teams, including the 2002 squad depicted in the film, was the elite starting rotation headed by three young, homegrown studs: Tim Hudson, Mark Mulder, and Barry Zito (who won the 2002 Cy Young award). Only Hudson is depicted in the film, and it's when he starts letting the 11-0 game get away, although during a clubhouse scene you can see the back of an extra playing Barry Zito (recognizable due to his rare "75" uniform number). In addition, the offense sported 2002 MVP Miguel Tejada and a budding star in Eric Chavez (34 [=HRs=] each), who are shown but not really featured nor depicted as dangerous sluggers for the otherwise station-to-station offense.
* DownerEnding: Surprisingly averted. In real life, although the system espoused by Beane seemingly hasn't been that successful for the A's, as they've won their division only a handful of times in the 13 years since Beane took over, and they only won the divisional series once, a lot of people seem to forget that given the disparity between the amount of money being spent the A's and the big teams, they've never have and never could be competing directly with them. Just making it to the playoffs is a big result in itself and better than they could ever hope of.
** To some degree the point is that Billy succeeded: he changed baseball even if he didn't win with the A's. Hence mentioning the Red Sox winning the World Series two years later using the A's model.
* EpicFail: Subverted. They watch a video of a minor league game, in which an insecure player trips rounding First Base and crawls in a panic to get his hand back on the base, only for the bemused first baseman of the other team to tell the player he [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome smashed the ball over the fence for a home run.]]
* TheFilmOfTheBook
* FlippingTheTable: Beane flips his desk in frustration when Howe steadfastly refuses to play Hatteberg over Pena.
* GameOfNerds: Naturally. Beane uses statistics to change the way the Oakland A's recruit players and play the game.
* HistoricalVillainUpgrade: This is one of the main complaints about the film's accuracy, especially given that the guys being portrayed as villains were all still alive when it came out and capable of coming to their own defense.
* InsultBackfire: David Justice calls out Beane for his "just-for-show" antics with the team, and that with his resume and $7 million salary, he's above Beane's style. Beane reminds him that the Yankees are paying half his salary as part of the deal with Oakland:
-->'''Billy''': That's what the New York Yankees think of you. They're paying you three and a half million dollars to play against them.
* IntelligenceEqualsIsolation: Peter Brand is frequently depicted as working in his office alone on his computer (this portrayal is apparently what led [=DePodesta=] to withdraw permission to be portrayed). Beane has to coax him to go on a road trip with the team, where he sits next to David Justice still typing away.
* ItWillNeverCatchOn: The concept of Sabremetrics, which drives the plot.
* {{Jerkass}}: Art Howe. In real life, Beane fired him following the loss to Minnesota. Unsurprisingly, the real Art Howe was one of the movie's most vocal critics.
* OnlyInItForTheMoney: Averted. At the end of the film, Beane turns down 12.5 million dollars to stay with the A's.
* OpposingSportsTeam: Highlighted with the Yankees, as per their contractual arrangement to be the villain in any baseball movie not starring them. They don't appear as villains on the field (the team's final defeat comes at the hands of the Minnesota Twins, as it did in real life), but they are held up throughout the movie as the shining example of the big-market team against whom the small-market Athletics are trying to compete financially.
** The Red Sox to a lesser extent.
* PlayingAgainstType: Jonah Hill in a dramatic role; he was nominated for an Oscar.
* PutMeInCoach: Manager Art Howe refuses to play Scott Hatteberg at first base because of Hatteberg's lack of experience. Beane trades the player ahead of Hatteberg on the depth chart, forcing Howe to finally play him. The A's become very good very fast.
* RagtagBunchOfMisfits: [[JustifiedTrope Justified]]. They deliberately choose players who are undervalued due to perceived flaws.
* RealitySubtext: Paul [=DePodesta=]'s change of heart about how he was portrayed led to the composite character of Peter Brand being written in his place. Miller did note that [=DePodesta=] was still helpful with the production despite this.
* RedOniBlueOni: Billy Beane and Peter Brand.
* ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney: [[InvertedTrope Inverted]]. A more appropriate name would be, "Screw The Rules, I ''Don't'' Have Money."
* ShownTheirWork: With a few liberties taken with the A's roster for dramatic purposes, just about everything else, from the rosters and front office personnel of other teams to the correct 2002 signage on the outfield wall, is just about accurate, right down to referring to Eric Byrnes as "Byrnesy" as he was known around the league.
* ShoutOut: Peter Brand is watching film on minor leaguer Kevin Youkilis, dubbing him the "Greek God of Walks" and talking about how scouts dismiss him due to his unnatural batting stance. Youkilis would go on to play on the two World Series-winning Red Sox squads and become one of the best hitters in the game in the late 2000s.
* SpiritualSuccessor: To ''TheSocialNetwork'', another Creator/AaronSorkin scripted film BasedOnATrueStory about a subject that at first glance would not seem to be an interesting one to make a movie about.
* TantrumThrowing: The fiercely competitive Beane likes to hurl and hit things when the frustration level is high.
* TemptingFate: With the A's gunning for their record 20th consecutive win, Billy's daughter implores him to break his routine and watch the game for once to enjoy his accomplishment; with the A's up 11, she insists, "You won't jinx it!" The Royals make up the 11-run difference once Billy arrives at the Coliseum.
* TimeshiftedActor: Billy as a young man.
* UnlikelyHero: Light-hitting Scott Hatteberg hits a walkoff homer (although he did have a respectable 15 during the actual 2002 season).
* WhatCouldHaveBeen: The movie began production with Creator/StevenSoderbergh directing and Demetri Martin in the Jonah Hill role. After Soderbergh turned in his first dailies, Sony found his part-scripted, part-documentary, part-animation (which had Bill James voicing himself, explaining the idea of Sabremetrics) approach unmarketable and he was fired after about a week of shooting. The production was shut down for a year while Creator/AaronSorkin was brought to do rewrites and after Bennett Miller was hired to direct, production finally restarted.
* WorkHardPlayHard: Jeremy Giambi's philosophy as a ballplayer; he was noted for his frequent partying.