[[quoteright:356:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/The_Three_Caballeros.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:356: That's [[EnsembleDarkhorse Jose Carioca]] in the middle, [[GunsAkimbo Panchito Pistoles]] to the right, [[DonaldDuck and]] [[MyFriendsAndZoidberg some low-key,]] [[BlatantLies unknown individual]] [[WesternAnimation/DonaldDuck to the left.]]]]

->''[[IAmSong "We're three Caballeros]], [[HaveAGayOldTime three gay Caballeros]]''
->''[[{{Pun}} They say we are birds of a feather!"]]''

Released in [[TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation 1944 (In Mexico, 1945 in the States)]], '''''The Three Caballeros''''' (Caballero being Spanish for either ''knight'' or ''gentleman'', depending on context) is the 7th film in the Franchise/DisneyAnimatedCanon. A follow-up to ''Disney/SaludosAmigos'', The Three Caballeros once again explores [[LatinLand Latin American]] culture, this time covering Mexico, a country that was left out of ''Saludos Amigos''. The film stars WesternAnimation/DonaldDuck, José Carioca (from ''Saludos Amigos'') and introduces Panchito Pistoles from Mexico, who together make the eponymous Three Caballeros.

The film is an AnimatedAnthology, although the segments aren't as divided as they are in ''Saludos Amigos'', and flow together with one plot line of Donald having received gifts for his birthday:
* The film opens with Donald receiving a birthday present from his friends in Latin America. The present contains three smaller parcels. The first one he opens is a film projector. He sets it up, and watches it. The film ''Aves Raras'' or "Strange Birds" contains shorts about birds:
** ''The Cold-Blooded Penguin'' is about a Penguin named Pablo ([[NamesTheSame no]] [[TheBackyardigans relation]]) who can't stand the cold. After repeated attempts being thwarted by his inability go too far from his house, he decides to just take his house with him on an ice floe. His trip to the Galapagos Islands takes him up the coast of South America, pointing out the various landmarks along the way.
** After this short, the film then documents actual birds of South America, introducing the [[ScrewySquirrel Aracuan]] and his silly antics.
** ''The Flying Gauchito'' follows the story of a boy from Uruguay, who catches and befriends a flying donkey, which he names Burrito (which means "little donkey"). Together, the two enter a race.
* With this, the film in the projector ends, and music starts coming from one of his other presents. Donald opens it to find a pop-up book on Brazil with his old friend José Carioca inside. José suggests that the two should go to Bahia, singing two whole songs about how great Bahia is and that they should go there (respectively) before they actually go.
* After leaving Bahia, Donald unwraps his third present from Mexico which explodes open, releasing various Mexican items and the rooster Panchito. After the three sing the Three Caballeros theme song together, he presents Donald with a Piñata, and explains ''Las Posadas'', the story of a group of Mexican children re-enacting the trek of Mary and Joseph for Christmas.
** After breaking the Piñata, Panchito explains the origin of the Eagle on the Mexican flag, and the trio takes a tour of Mexico on a flying sarape.
** After this, Panchito explains how even the skies of Mexico City are made of love, at which point, a woman appears in the night sky and begins singing ''You Belong to my Heart''. Entering the picture alone, Donald follows the woman until she eventually kisses him, which causes things to turn into a DisneyAcidSequence, where he then dances with a woman and various cacti.
* The movie then ends on a bullfight, with Donald playing the bull, Panchito playing the matador, and Jose playing the cheering crowd (yes, all of it). But there is a catch: Donald's bull costume is loaded with firecrackers and other explosives.

The Trio would later appear in two stories written by DonRosa, a few episodes of The HouseOfMouse and a dark ride at [[DisneyThemeParks Epcot]]'s Mexico Pavilion. A Third Latin American film that would have introduced a fourth, Cuban Caballero was planned, but never released.

The Three Caballeros has garnered an unusually large fandom for such a relatively obscure film[[note]]Possibly due to their appearance on the official first (but not released first) volume of ''[[FollowTheBouncingBall Disney Sing Along Songs]]''[[/note]], the majority of which seems to be into [[AnthropomorphicShift drawing the characters as humans]] and [[{{Slash}} shipping them]]. Most of this fandom can be found on {{Tumblr}} and DeviantArt.

Not to be confused with ''[[Film/ThreeAmigos ¡Three Amigos!]]'' (which [[HilariousInHindsight actually had "The Three Caballeros" as its working title]]).
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This film provides examples of:
* ABoyAndHisX: A Boy and his Flying Donkey.
* AccidentalKiss: When Panchito and José pick up Donald to leave Acapulco, Donald is in the middle of blindfolded bathing beauty chasing, and thus thinking that he's caught one, ends up kissing José. Three kisses and he still can't tell he's kissing a parrot until the blindfold is removed.
* AlmostKiss: Donald tries to do this with Dora Luz during his reverie, only for it to be continuously disrupted by José and Panchito. This is actually averted in that they finally do kiss.
* BagOfHolding: The Piñata holds a ''lot'' of stuff, including the Mexican picture book, which is actually much bigger than the Piñata was in the first place.
* BarefootCartoonAnimals: Panchito and (probably) Jose.
* BerserkButton: The normally amiable, almost painfully affectionate José becomes...er...[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7B3P8GvBkxE rather indignant]] when his cigar is stolen by the Aracuan.
* BilingualBonus: English, Spanish '''and''' Portuguese!
* [[{{Bowdlerise}} Bowdlerisation]]: You could probably guess that in their modern appearances José no longer smokes cigars and Panchito no longer has two guns that he fires everywhere. DonRosa's ''The Magnficent Seven (minus 4) Caballeros'' at least acknowledges that the two used to have those. The "Gay Caballeros" line remains intact, though.
* BullSeeingRed: While Donald isn't an actual Bull, Panchito still plays with this by using a two-sided cape, switching colours when the audience isn't looking and taunting "What's the matter with you? Are you colour blind?"
* ButtMonkey: Donald.
* ChekhovsGift: The bull costume, one of the many surprises to emerge from the Piñata.
* ChromaticArrangement: Donald is blue, José is green, and Panchito is red. All three of them incorporate colours from their respective countries' flags. Panchito is designed to be mostly red specifically so that he'll stand out from the other two. Both Donald and José have already used White and Green (the other colours of the Mexican flag) in their designs.
* CigarFuseLighting: Jose Carioca lights the fireworks on Donald Duck's bull costume with his cigar.
* CloudCuckoolander: Both Jose and Panchito, and ''especially'' the Ariquan bird.
* ContinuityNod: As Donald opens the box at the beginning of the film, a snippet of the theme song from ''Disney/SaludosAmigos'' plays. When José meets Donald, his reaction mirrors the one he has in the earlier film - To ramble on in Portuguese before summing it up in a short English phrase. "Or as you Americans say: What's cooking?" Similarly, when Donald asks Joe to "hit him with his boogie beat", Joe does so via a music-generating dance similar to the one he did in ''Saludos Amigos''.
** In ''The Cold-Blooded Penguin'' sequence, you can hear a snippet of the llama music from the ''Lake Titicaca'' sequence while Pablo was sailing alongside the South American coast.
** The music that plays while Gauchito is taming the Flying Burro was previously heard in the "Gaucho Goofy" segment of ''Saludos Amigos''.
* ConvectionSchmonvection: Pablo's ice floe doesn't start melting until right after he crosses the equator, when it should have melted long before that.
* CoveredInKisses: Happens twice to Donald. The first time brought on an abrupt scene change, the second time things becomes full blown DisneyAcidSequence.
* CrowdSong: "Os Quindines De Yaya" (AKA that song in Bahia).
* {{Crossdresser}}: All three Caballeros. During the José's second song, he briefly wears a Carmen Miranda-style costume. After the whole Bahia sequence, while Donald is descibing what he likes about it, his appearance changes into a more feminine one when he mentions the women. All three appear in drag (with live-action ladies' legs) during a hallucination. Finally, during the bull fight in the end, Panchito briefly wears his cape like a skirt.
** Interestingly, Carmen Miranda's ''sister'' is in the film's Brazilian sequence.
* TheDanza: José is still voiced by José Oliviera, while Professor Holloway (Narrator of ''The Cold-Blooded Penguin) is voiced by Sterling Holloway.
* {{Determinator}}: "... with a tenacity of purpose seldom seen in a penguin."
* DerangedAnimation: Some parts of this film skip being bizarre and practically start off in the freakin' TwilightZone.
** "Submitted for your approval, a journey into the mind of a duck as he searches for his [[MarsNeedsWomen Latin American soulmate]]." *{{beat}}* ''looks confusedly and worriedly at his cigarette'' "What the ''hell'' is [[WhatDoYouMeanItWasntMadeOnDrugs in this thing]]?"
* DisneyAcidSequence: Things get a bit trippy at the end, to put it mildly. Arguably "Donald's Surreal Reverie" is matched in its Disney Acid Sequence-ness only by "[[Disney/{{Dumbo}} Pink Elephants on Parade]]" and "[[TheManyAdventuresOfWinnieThePooh Heffalumps and Woozles]]". It gets pretty weird in the middle too, just after Donald and José open the box from Mexico.
* TheEnd: The finale involves a Bullfight with Donald as the bull made out of fireworks. José sets the fireworks off with his cigar, which then spell out [[BilingualBonus "Fin", "Fim" and "The End"]], highlighting the multiculturalism theme of the movie.
* EverythingsBetterWithPenguins: Yes, there is a penguin.
* EverythingDances: Towards the end of the Bahia segment, the ''city starts bouncing like it's made of jelly''. '''''Even the moon.'''''
* FanNickname: Back in his homeland of Brazil, José is [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff endearingly]] known as "Zé Carioca".
** It's not just a Nickname, In Portuguese we generally use Zé instead of José. It's really rare to hear José as a name.
* FantasticFireworks: Used to spell out TheEnd.
* FurryConfusion: The look at South American birds has normal birds that are only a little anthromorphised - no more than in, say ''Disney/{{Dumbo}}'' or ''Disney/SleepingBeauty''... and then there's the Aracuan.
** The movie is being watched by [[HalfDressedCartoonAnimal Donald Duck]].
* GainaxEnding: See DisneyAcidSequence.
* GetOnWithItAlready: José asks Donald if he's been to Bahia 5 times before Donald finally loses his patience as reverses the question, asking if José himself has been to Bahia. [[spoiler: He hasn't]].
* GratuitousForeignLanguage: Joe is continually speaking Portuguese, even though he knows Donald doesn't understand and he'll have to repeat himself in English. Comparatively, Panchito really only utters a few short Spanish interjections.
* GunsAkimbo: Panchito loves to fire off those guns of his.
* HelloNurse: "She makes ''cookies'' my friends! ''Cookies!''" Cookie-making señoritas, bathing beauties, dancing cactus and flower women - this one's got it all!
* HereWeGoAgain: The Cold-Blooded Penguin ends with Pablo showing a desire to make a trip back to Antarctica.
-->'''Narrator:''' ''(laughs)'' Never satisfied! That's human nature for you, even if you're a penguin.\\
'''Donald:''' You're absolutely right.
* HyperspaceMallet: José's green hammer. He bashes Donald with it to shrink him down to size, then later lends it to Donald so he can use it to bash the orange seller over the head.
* HypocriticalHumor: When Donald mimics José's little ritual, he proclaims [[NothingUpMySleeve "Nada aqui nesta manga"]] as tons of cards pour out of his sleeve.
* IncredibleShrinkingMan: José shrinks down Donald in order to enter a pop-up book of Brazil. The size really doesn't really come into play until Donald needs to grow again in order to open his next present.
* InteractiveNarrator: ''The Flying Gauchito''. Which is interesting, because the narrator and the Gauchito are the same person.
* {{Keet}}: Panchito.
* TheLastStraw: The Marrequito's nest, which the narrator explains only looks like it's randomly thrown together, but is really built to withstand anything... until the Aracuan gives the Marrequito a small twig to put onto the pile, which causes the whole thing to fall apart, and causes the narrator to add, "Well, ''almost'' anything."
* LovableSexManiac: All three of the boys definitely qualify in this movie.
* MarsNeedsWomen: Donald and José spend a lot of time lusting after Yaya.
* MatryoshkaObject: The present Donald Duck receives from José Carioca and Panchito Pistoles at the very beginning.
* MultinationalTeam: American Donald Duck, Brazilian José Carioca, and Mexican Panchito.
* OpeningChorus
* PaintingTheMedium: The Aracuan Bird breaks out of his by coming out of the picture to shake Donald's hand. He later steals José's cigar and runs off the edge of the film with it.
* NamesTheSame: A very obscure variant comprehensible only to Disney buffs, but the Pablo the Penguin here should not be confused with [[TheBackyardigans a certain other penguin named Pablo]]
* PosthumousNarration: "...Neither him nor me was ever seen again as long as we lived!"
** Not necessarily. Just because they were never ''seen'' again doesn't mean they were never ''heard'' again!
* [[PraisingShowsYouDontWatch Praising Places You've Never Been To]]: InUniverse example when [[spoiler:José sings about how he longs for Bahia, even though he admits to having never been there before afterward]].
* NationalStereotypes: All three Caballeros to some degree:
** Donald's [[{{Eagleland}} an American]] [[JerkWithAHeartOfGold and a nice enough guy]], [[LovableSexManiac provided he doesn't see any hot women]] [[BerserkButton or you don't get him riled]], [[BoisterousBruiser in which case all bets are off]].
** José's is Brazilian, suave, cigar-smoking and loves music and women, the classic image of the ''malandro''[[note]]Literally "scoundrel", but in a more affectionate connotation that has been embraced by samba musicians as the symbol of more romantic times, as opposed to the GangstaStyle that is more common in modern-day Rio de Janeiro.[[/note]]
** Panchito is Mexican, loud, wears a sombrero and can bullfight.
* NiceHat: Panchito's Sombrero, from which he generates 2 more Sombreros for José and Donald.
** José's hat is pretty snappy too.
** Donald's sailor cap.
* NoNameGiven: Panchito's name is only given in the opening credits, and none of the official materials for the movie mention a last name. As a result, there have been various full names attributed to him. His first comic book appearance gave him the name [[OverlyLongName El Gayo José Francisco Sandro de Lima y la Loma Pancho Allegre]] (Where "Panchito" is just a nickname), while modern comics (Such as the DonRosa stories) went with [[AlliterativeName Panchito Pistoles]], while the House of Mouse goes with [[OverlyLongName Panchito Romero Miguel Junipero Francisco Quintero González]].
** In strictest grammatical terms his given name is probably Pancho, if nothing else is certain ("ito" or "ita" is the diminutive form; the Spanish-language equivalent of calling someone "Jimmy" instead of "Jim" or "James").
*** Nope. Pancho isn't a name; it's a common nickname for the name "Francisco". So in strictest grammatical terms, his given name is probably Francisco.
* OverlyLongGag: Panchito holds the last note of the theme song for a good 20 seconds, all the while, Donald and José try various things to stop him, including the classic [[GravityIsAHarshMistress cutting out the floor around him, only for everything but the segment cut out to fall.]]
* ParasolParachute: José uses his like one.
* PhallicWeapon: Some of the comics more directly address Panchito's apparent need to fire his guns off whenever he's in a good mood.
* PokemonSpeak: The Aracuan Bird's crazy song contains its own name.
* PortalPicture: Panchito brings with him a picture book of Mexico. They enter the pictures on various pages to visit various places of Mexico. Panchito even zaps the first picture they enter in order to bring it to life.
* RandomEventsPlot: There's no real storyline except that it's Donald's birthday. Things get... confusing.
* RealSongThemeTune: The Three Caballeros theme song uses the same tune as an existing song, ''Ay Jalisco no te Rajes''. In fact, when Panchito begins singing in Spanish, he's actually singing a verse from the original song.
* RogerRabbitEffect: One of Disney's first attempts at blending Live Action and Animation in a feature film. In Bahia and Donald's acid trip, the live-action actors are appearing on a mostly animated background. In Panchito's tour of Mexico, the animated Caballeros are in fully live-action settings.
* RuleOfFun
* ScrewySquirrel: The Aracuan Bird, perhaps the best representative of this trope in the Disney canon.
* SettingOffSong: "Have You Been to Bahia?"
* ShoutOut: "But it proved to be the Juan Fernandez Islands, where Literature/RobinsonCrusoe once lived. And still does, apparently..."
* ShowWithinAShow: The film reel that introduces Paolo the Penguin, the kid with the flying donkey, and the Aracuan Bird.
* SomewhereSong: "Bahia."
* SpiritualSuccessor: To ''SaludosAmigos''.
* ThirteenIsUnlucky: The card that comes with Donald's birthday gifts gives his Birthday is Friday the 13th, obviously referencing his poor luck. Although this contradicts Donald's canon birthday, which is accepted to be June 9th.
** WaltDisney [[WordOfGod once said that]] [[AnimatedActors his characters are actors in and of themselves]] and that the [[NegativeContinuity events of movies like this are, in a sense, fiction.]] So we could accept that Donald-the-character's birthday is June 9th, and that the Friday the 13th birthday only applies to this movie.
* ThoseTwoGuys: The FatAndSkinny penguins in ''The Cold-Blooded Penguin''.
* WheelOFeet: Donald's feet spin this way when he gets moving fast enough.
* ZanyCartoon: One of Disney's most cartoony works.
** With all the notes and comments about this movie's weirdness, let's face it: ''The Three Caballeros'' is like ''{{FLCL}}'''s great-grandfather or something.
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