[[quoteright:350:[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/deja_q_hd_046_resized_6484.jpg]]]]

Let's count the times that we wish that the creators of Star Trek hadn't [[CatchPhrase made it so]] during the many decades that the show has been around.

Keep in mind:
* Sign your entries
* One moment per show to a troper, if multiple entries are signed to the same troper the more recent one will be cut.
* Moments only, no "just everything he said, " "The entire show, " or "This entire season, " entries.
* No contesting entries. This is subjective, the entry is their opinion.
* No natter. As above, anything contesting an entry will be cut, and anything that's just contributing more can be made its own entry.
* Explain ''why'' it's a Dethroning Moment Of Suck.
* No RealLife examples, including Reality Television and ExecutiveMeddling. That is just asking for trouble.
* No ALLCAPS, no '''bold''', and no ''italics'' unless it's the title of a work. We are not yelling the [=DMoSs=] out loud.
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!''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration''
* Tropers/JackassOfTheCentury: ''The Big Goodbye''. There were two plots, one involving an interesting test of Captain Picard's ability to establish good diplomatic relations with a race of sentient insects, another involving a rather boring 1940's drama (which is something Sci-Fi watchers clearly do not watch Sci-Fi to see). Guess which plot overshadowed the other? Worse still, they didn't even show a visual of the bugs, not once. Normally, the {{BottleEpisode}}s from the series were the better ones. This, clearly, was an exception.
** Tropers/GrumpyOldMan: This was mine for TNG as well. In addition to the reasons above, it's made even worse by the fact that the 1940's characters were all cliche stereotypes. It comes off as a cookie cutter detective story that pretended to be something interesting.
** {{Tropers/JunkManDan}}: This was basically the writers' way of saying "Here's an interesting plot to lure you in, now watch this low budget stock plot that we wanted to film instead." The dethroning moment is really the mere mention of the Jaradar, as, while not top notch, the no-so-subplottish holodeck thing would have been more tolerable if not the bait and switch.
* Tropers/IraStevenBehrSucks: There's also the end of ''Reunion''. Worf kills a problematic Klingon politician who no one misses, and does so in accordance with Klingon law, creating no actual problems, and arguably solving a few. Picard still reprimands him for this.
* [=InTheGallbladder=]: ''Up the Long Ladder.'' I've seen some pretty bad episodes, but none of them have gotten under my skin as seriously as this one. It starts with a plot that could have seen Pulaski actually demonstrating those positive traits they keep saying she has, then promptly ignores it, but that's not my biggest issue. The A-plot revolves around Star Fleet interacting with the Bringoldis, whose character amounts to no more than "blatant Irish stereotype + blatant Pilgrim sterotype", but that's not my biggest issue. My biggest issue is ...Riker. The writers turned him into human garbage, then pretty much wrote the script around either justifying or validating his godawful behavior. I could point to many examples, but the biggest one is this: When the Mariposans, who reproduce entirely by cloning, ask Riker for a DNA sample so they can save their colony from the impact of nearly 300 years of replicative fading, he turns them down because he feels that cloning him would make him less special. He is considered to be in the right for this, to the point where he faces no retribution for destroying a clone the Mariposans make of him, using a stolen DNA sample.
* {{Tropers/Nebagram}}: ''Rascals''. Dear god, Rascals. We start with an utterly idiotic plot: the transporter accidentally turns some of the crew into children. Whilst not a bad idea for a show in itself, the away it's executed is utter laziness (transport accident? Again!?) and the show seems happy to gloss over the fact that what they've accidentally stumbled across is nothing less than the secret to immortality itself. At no point during the show was it stated that there were any negative aspects to the transformation other than having to go through adolescence again- after which they'd presumably be healthy twentysomethings. Sure, Picard may have lost his commanding presence, but he's gained a full sixty years extra life. Guinan- one of the other kids transformed- have gained over half a millennium of extra life. This in itself would be forgivable, but then the show goes straight over a cliff by having the Enterprise attacked... By Ferengi. In clapped-out birds of prey, which capture the Enterprise in seconds and force the entire adult crew- all 900+ of them- into slavery. Never mind the fact that we never see more than a dozen Ferengi at any point, never mind the fact that Riker should have obliterated the enemy ships the second they decloaked, never mind the fact that even with Worf incapacitated (again) the Enterprise has dozens of highly-trained security officers who you'd have thought would be able to tear the Ferengi a new one, apparently two Ferengi holding Riker and Data at gunpoint causes the entire ship to fall down in a second and have to be saved by the children... The same way everyone hated Wesley doing in season 1 and 2. This episode is every negative aspect of TNG in one 44-minute long 'example'.

!''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine''
* Tropers/IraStevenBehrSucks: The part in ''What You Leave Behind'' where they cured the changelings. Sure, it's prefaced as a peace brokering deal, but the changelings had a history of violence and genocide; to trust that this would never happen again is, at best, extremely naive.
* Tropers/{{COFFEENEBULA}}: The last Ferengi episode "Profit and Lace". It's meant to be both funny and serious, and it's neither. I just did not find Quark acting as a female at all, to the point of painfulness. To this day, it's one of the few Deep Space Nine episodes I haven't made it all the way through. Most of the fandom [[FanonDiscontinuity agrees that it's one of the worst episodes of DS9.]]
* Tropers/GrumpyOldMan: ''Valiant''. Other than breaking Nog, there was little point to the story. Throughout the series, Ron D. Moore had found plenty of ways to torment and kill perfectly sympathetic characters, but this was by far the worst example of his writing atrocities. And Nog would later be broken anyway in ''The Siege of AR 558'', nullifying what little purpose this story even had to begin with.

!''Series/StarTrekVoyager''
* @/DragonQuestZ: "Threshold". When you combine all the worst parts of the Franchise/StarTrek franchise (ResetButton, HollywoodScience, TechnoBabble, SpecialEffectsFailure, and CharacterDerailment), can you blame the executives for all but declaring this CanonDiscontinuity? [[WordOfGod Brannon Braga himself]] even admits to screwing the episode up.
** Tropers/{{Tuomas}}: After all the bogus science and general stupidity in ''Threshold'', the final straw, the thing that made this the worst Trek episode I've ever seen, is the last plot twist: the Voyager crew discovers Janeway and Paris, who have devolved into this weird salamander creatures, because that's what traveling at warp 10 does to you... And they also discover the two have mated and have produced offspring! So in the three days they were missing, they've turned into lizards, mated with each other, conceived children, and the kids clearly aren't newborn either, so that's one helluva fast reproduction process. Chakotay then inexplicably leaves the baby salamanders on the alien planet, and they are never ever mentioned again. So the whole twist of Janeway and Paris having kids was absolutely pointless: it doesn't have anything to do with the themes of this episode, and it's completely forgotten by the next one. They just added an utterly silly and unscientific plot twist on top of all the other ridiculous things in ''Threshold'' for no reason at all.
* Halfstep: The 2nd season episode "Alliances." To sum up: Voyager has been getting hit pretty hard by repeated Kazon attacks over the previous few weeks, so Chakotay convinces Janeway to go against her normal Starfleet training and beliefs, and to try to make alliances with some of the Kazon sects that are attacking them. Janeway eventually goes along with this, making contact with several of the factions that have been giving them a hard time. Eventually it is brought up jokingly that they should try to form an alliance with Seska and the Kazon Nistrim. Janeway takes it seriously, much to Chakotay's dismay. Now, there's a bit more to this episode, but the previous is all you really need to know to understand where this [=DMoS=] is coming from. ''Alliances'' is just one long IdiotPlot, filled with people being stupider than normal, making decisions that are questionable even by Voyager standards. A brief list of the questionable stupidity:
## When Chakotay states that they may need to reinterpret Starfleet principles in their situation, Janeway retorts that she hasn't seen any evidence that they've failed the crew yet. Apparently getting stranded in the Delta Quadrant, getting half of two crews killed on what was supposed to be a routine snatch and grab, and having the Kazon smear the Federation's good name all over the quadrant (seen in Dreadnought) while routinely attacking Voyager doesn't count.
## Janeway decides to make the alliance work, then calls in the Kazon Nistrim, the sect least likely to cooperate with Voyager, on the justification that Seska and the Nistrim are as equally bad as every other Kazon sect, when in reality, there is nothing supporting that belief. Furthermore, the other Kazon sects don't have Seska there constantly goading them to take technology from Voyager.
## As part of the alliance, Culluh makes the demand that they do a crew swap. Voyager is leaving the quadrant forever; why would Janeway agree to that, and why would Culluh, mysoginist or no, even think that Janeway would agree to that?
## Janeway meets the Trabe, the species that the Kazon stole their technology from. When the Trabe fleet runs into Voyager, they even talk with her, instead of immediately shooting, even though their fleet has more than enough ships to destroy Voyager (just 2 or 3 Kazon ships have been shown to be enough to seriously cripple Voyager, the Trabe have dozens in their fleet). The Trabe are thankful, polite, and eager to make an alliance with Voyager. So when the Trabe want to execute every single Kazon maj, Janeway has a problem with this because? At worst the Trabe are about as crooked as the Kazon, but they don't have a problem with Voyager. They also didn't seem to have a problem with the rest of the quadrant, as according to Neelix, the Trabe seemed to have a very good reputation. The Kazon are at war with everyone, attack and enslave random races, and won't even deal with Voyager, even though Janeway has bent over backwards to try and deal with them. How is dealing with the Trabe a worse deal than dealing with the Kazon again?
* Troper/Hyrin: ''Unimatrix Zero''. The episode where Janeway gets assimilated ''on purpose'' and the Borg Queen completely loses her shit and starts self-destructing her fleet on a whim. SFDebris's synopsis about this episode is the stuff of legends.
* Tropers/{{Doodler}}: ''Tattoo''. Chakotay's status as the resident MagicalNativeAmerican varied in levels of offensiveness, but this episode was what proved that the writers had no idea what they were doing. To quote, the reason that the Native Americans are magical? They were [[TouchedByVorlons touched by aliens]], who were played by white actors. [[MightyWhitey White]] [[WhiteMansBurden actors]]. Oh, and until they were touched by these white aliens, they were backwards, language-less cavemen. First time I felt the need to take a shower after watching Star Trek.
* Tropers/GrumpyOldMan: ''Course: Oblivion'': The episode combines ShootTheShaggyDog with plot holes and contradictions. Not only were a bunch of innocent beings killed off for no purpose other than to satisfy the writers' sick desires, but there was ''no reason'' that the silver blood aliens should have come to believe they were the original voyager crew to begin with. Silver blood Tom and Kim, at the least, would have had memories, recent memories at that, to contradict this. And why would silver blood Janeway give orders to keep heading for the Alpha Quadrant, repeatedly, even in the face of overwhelming evidence that it meant certain death, ''for her entire crew''? Granted, real Janeway didn't always make the most rational of decisions, but it was never on this level of blatant and flagrant stupidity. And since the silver blood beings are clearly at least as sentient as the Voyager crew they copied themselves from, it can't be explained by biology. While WordOfGod says that this was an attempt at DarkerAndEdgier, that's no excuse, ''even if it's true'', because [[TropesAreTools darker and edgier isn't always better]]. If it were, all non-horror genres would be passe by now.
** {{Tropers/JunkManDan}}: Indeed, while I am not of the opinion that ShootTheShaggyDog is never okay to use myself, it certainly has to be used right before I will tolerate it. WordOfGod pretty much confirms that this was done for the sake of it, and any ShootTheShaggyDog done as such, is an automatic dethroning moment.
** {{Tropers/Bronnt}}: What makes this a DMOS for me is it's relation to the series. Too often Voyager ends with a literal reset button so the characters stay bland without real character development. The characters on the fake!Voyager experience a lot more character development than their real counterparts ever do. Fake!Harry was more interesting in this episode than the real Harry Kim 99% of the time. The lack of consequence was a frustrating theme of the show, and this episode got to tease character development while once again being consequence-free for the real Voyager.
* 13thman: My pick for ST Voyager has to be "Flesh and Blood". This is actually a retroactive [[DethroningMomentOfSuck DMOS]], starting with "The Killing Game", but it culminates here. Plot summary: the Hirogen are being killed by holodeck technology that Janeway gave them at the end of "The Killing Game". Janeway decides to save the Hirogen from the homicidal holograms against the Hirogen's will. Now that that is out of the way, here's the DMOS: why? Just why? I don't need to go into any particular details about the morals, motivations, actions, or logic of anyone in particular in this episode. All you need to know, in order to understand why Janeway taking the Hirogen's side against ANYBODY (even arguably the ''Borg'') is just wrong, is this: the Hirogen are the serial killers of the galaxy. The Hirogen's [[PlanetOfHats hat]] is using superior strength and firepower to hunt down any sentient creature, whether or not it is armed, whether or not it is a physical match for them, whether or not said creatures are surrendering, fleeing, trying to make peace with them, whatever. They strip their kills down to the bone and display various body parts around their ships as trophies. These aren't the Cardassians, or the Klingons, or the Romulans, or the Kazon or Jem Hadar, who kill for country, or honor, or for their master or state. Unlike the races just mentioned, there's no such thing as a target being unworthy for any reason (sick, old, not involved in a conflict, etc). The Hirogen kill because it gives them wood. Nowhere is this made more evident than in "The Killing Game", where the Hirogen turn all of Voyager into a holodeck, so they can ''repeatedly kill and resuscitate'' the members of the crew in various fantasies. Their evil is so ridiculous it causes a ''DarthWiki/WallBanger'': the Hirogen get pissed at the doctor because the holodeck weapons are killing the crew members faster than the doctor can resuscitate then, however they refuse to turn on the holodeck safeties, because holodeck safeties make the killing less interesting. Wait - if Holodeck weapons and soldiers are good enough to kill the crew, why waste time with the crew? Why not just turn all the safeties off on the holodeck and shoot at 100 foot lava monsters that bleed fire all day? Well, because like I said before, the Hirogen are the serial killers of the galaxy - their goal isn't to satiate violent urges like a Klingon or Jem Hadar, their goal is to kill people. But, enough about TKG: when "Flesh and Blood" rolls around, the Hirogen have managed to program holograms smart enough to cruelly kill every Hirogen they come across. Given what was just described in TKG, the question we have to ask here is, once again, ''why?'' These serial killers made a weapon so powerful it kills them, and the first time Janeway offers to help, they threaten to turn her into prey, again? Why is there a plot about Janeway detailing the moral and philosophical reasons why Voyager has a duty to help the sadistic homicidal aliens that want nothing more than to kill them all and wear their bones for necklaces? ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Picard]]'' wouldn't have put up with that shit, and he is infamous for being slower on the phaser button than Kirk or Sisko. That Janeway did ANYTHING other than leave these animals to die the KarmicDeath they deserved turns this into a [[DethroningMomentOfSuck DMOS]] for this troper.
* WhyNotNow: For me, it's Neelix's actions in the two-parter "Basics." We all know Neelix was a CreatorsPet, and that all his claims to grandeur and his posturing were something we just had to live with, no matter how stupid it was, but those were the episodes which literally killed his character and ''Voyager'' as a whole for me. Why? Because Neelix gets two people killed. Neelix... gets two people killed! First, the entire reason he decided to join ''Voyager'' in the first place was because he claimed to be a survival expert, he knew the region, etc, but the thing you need to know about Neelix is that he has a massive ego, and he boasts about abilities he does not possess, so when the time actually comes that the Captain puts him in charge of one of the teams sent out to help gather supplies during one of the most basic survival situations of all, the ship stolen, stripped of their technology, he winds up not only getting two members of the ''Voyager'' crew killed due to his incompetence, but poor Hogan, the first victim, SwallowedWhole by the vicious land eel hiding in a nearby cave, the most gruesome and horrible end for any sentient being, but only after ordering Hogan to gather a bunch of bones, picking one up, and then dropping it right in front of Hogan and leaving him alone to pick it up again. It's amazing Neelix or ''Voyager'' ever had any fans after that.

!''Series/StarTrekEnterprise''
* Tropers/BryceBryans: "Dear Doctor" in which Archer decides not to help a race of dying people because he is led by HollywoodEvolution and believes helping them would violate a directive that hasn't come into existence yet. "Until I have that... ''directive''..."
* Tropers/{{Crazyrabbits}}: "These Are The Voyages" is almost universally reviled by fans (and the cast!), and for good reason: the series (and franchise finale) is a ''Next Generation'' episode in disguise, mixing {{Retcon}}s, out-of-character moments and a genuinely pathetic premise. However, in spite of all that, it might have been possible to excuse it as just being another lame episode... until the speech scene. Captain Archer is asked to give a speech during a ceremony making the founding of the United Federation of Planets, considered to be one of the defining moments in the history of that universe (and something the audience has never seen before). Captain Archer steps up to the podium, opens his mouth to say his first words... and it cuts to Riker and Troi watching the ceremony for a few seconds before terminating the holodeck program and leaving. It could have been one of (if not the) best moments in a series that was ridiculed during its entire existence, but it ends up being a woeful end to the original franchise (as ''Enterprise'' was the last Star Trek series aired in the original universe). Why, Braga, why?
* Tropers/{{Lancel}}: [[GainaxEnding The last sixty seconds]] of the third season finale "Zero Hour." What very nearly redeemed the entire show with easily the best episode of the series to date was instantly destroyed when Enterprise is, without explanation, suddenly and randomly thrown into 1945 Earth. Archer is randomly found by Nazis, and one of those Nazis is an alien. [[http://www.reallifecomics.com/archive/040528.html I am not alone in this]], but this moment tends to be overshadowed by "These Are The Voyages..." (see above). [[http://www.ditl.org DITL]] couldn't give the episode 5-stars because of just how much that ending sucked, and Graham admitted it easily had five stars up until that moment.
* Tropers/RomanatorX: "A Night in Sickbay" is all around complete crap, with rampant JerkAss behavior on Archer's part for no reason, completely messed up morals (why bring a dog on a foreign planet, just to start), and a RomanticPlotTumor between Archer and T'Pol. However, you can actually pinpoint the moment where the franchise crashed into the iceberg. It's as T'Poi is delivering some food to Archer during his night in sickbay. After acting nasty to her, he says this immortal line. "Sorry, I'm a little on edge. I haven't slept very much, but I'm doing the breast I... the best I can." They made a joke about breasts. On the same franchise that's supposed to explain the meeting of humans with other species... and they made a statement about breasts for comedy. At this point, they must have run out of ideas for intellectual comedy and just decided to make a joke about freaking breasts! To seal this as a DMOS, SFDebris called this the moment where the franchise bottomed out, and Website/TheAgonyBooth called it the exact moment where the series pretty much died.

!!''Star Trek'' films:
* Tropers/OlfinBedwere: Data's death in ''Film/StarTrekNemesis'' somehow manages to make Kirk [[DroppedABridgeOnHim getting a bridge dropped on him]] seem like a masterpiece of good film-making. Even leaving aside the stupidity of how the situation came around to begin with, the way it's filmed makes it feel like it's just some random redshirt who's dying, not a character we've known and loved for fifteen years. Making things even worse, only twenty seconds after Data's demise the film-makers feel the need to put in a gag about Picard forgetting the bridge viewscreen had been destroyed, which is pretty much the equivalent to Spock's death scene in the second film having a grinning [=McCoy=] lean into the frame after Spock expires, saying "He's dead, Jim!" and then winking at the camera.
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