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* Rob Newman and David Baddiel's stand-up. In the [[TheNineties early nineties]], they were the "New Rock 'n' Roll", hosting ''TheMaryWhitehouseExperience'' and playing sell out gigs at Wembley Arena. Then they fell out, split their partnership, and a few years later most of their stuff fell by the wayside. Intellectual and philosophical comedy, and their grunge-meets-preppy style, was replaced by "laddish" comedy (including Baddiel's own ''Fantasy Football League'' TV show) and the Britpop wars of {{Oasis}} vs. Blur. Occasionally you might hear someone in Britain say "That's you that is!", but so far there has been no revival of interest. Both of them are now well known as authors, but their stand-up careers have been largely forgotten.
** Rob Newman, anyway. David Baddiel's career recovered a few years later when he found a new partner in Frank Skinner. Skinner and Baddiel hosted the quirky sport programme ''Fantasy Football League'' and, with alt rock group The Lightning Seeds, scored a #1 UK hit with "Three Lions"...Then, ''Fantasy Football League'' was canceled and the bottom fell out of their career. Even though they can likely both retire from the royalties for "Three Lions", they've stuck around doing podcasts.
* AndrewDiceClay was a big hit in the late 80s/early 90s for his controversial, sexist insult humor (essentially the Creator/DonRickles of his day). However, his act was seen as annoying and offensive to some (most notably Creator/RogerEbert), mainly due to his tendencies to play his stage persona in reality, as well as the fact that [[BlackComedy being un-PC just for the sake of it]] was getting played out. The tipping point was the flop of his star vehicle film ''Film/TheAdventuresOfFordFairlane'' which, to add insult to injury, was removed from theaters due to pressure from MoralGuardians. Clay's popularity plummeted shortly afterwards; he subsequently tried to change his image as a result, even doing the failed Creator/{{CBS}} sitcom ''Bless This House'' where he played a [[PlayingAgainstType family man]], but to little avail.
* On a more general note, such comedians as Bernard Manning and Jim Davidson, well known for their racist, sexist and mother-in-law jokes, were once huge, but are pretty much jokes themselves now.
* Gallagher was huge in the TheEighties, selling out giant arenas and delivering expensive stage shows with a wide array of elaborate props. He fell quite far -- until illness forced him to retire in 2012, he toiled in relative obscurity in local shows and squabbled with his [[FollowTheLeader copycat]] brother, while his act took [[CreatorBreakdown an unpleasantly hateful, racist and homophobic turn]] (as described [[http://www.thestranger.com/seattle/gallagher-is-a-paranoid-right-wing-watermelon-smashing-maniac/Content?oid=4357855 here]]). His original act is mostly remembered as being representative of all that was wrong with stand-up comedy in TheEighties.
* The Series/BlueCollarComedy trend was established at the TurnOfTheMillennium. Creator/JeffFoxworthy, Creator/BillEngvall, Creator/LarryTheCableGuy, and RonWhite's routines played with DeepSouth / white trash stereotypes while applying a FlyoverCountry perspective to general stand-up topics. Often touring together, they even had a SketchComedy show on Creator/TheWB that reran on Creator/ComedyCentral. But Foxworthy's signature "You might be a redneck" routine was parodied by [[FollowTheLeader every group ever]] even ''before'' the trend exploded, Larry was overexposed (partially via the ''Cars'' films), Engvall moved on to host a short-lived revival of the game show ''Series/{{Lingo}}'', and White still does stand-up but has distanced himself from the rest of the group.
* DaneCook was one of the most popular stand-up comedians in the mid-2000s, particularly amongst high school and college students (he was notably one of the first entertainers to use MySpace to build up a huge fanbase). By 2005-06, he had gained over 2 million MySpace friends and his CD ''Retaliation'' went double-platinum and became the best-selling comedy album in over 30 years. Then came the severe HypeBacklash from critics who were not amused by his comedic style (consisting primarily of observational humor and telling [[ShaggyDogStory long-winded anecdotes]]) as well as hate coming from ''within'' the standup community, with numerous accusations of plagiarism and joke theft (most notably of LouisCK). This, combined with a few bad decisions in film roles (which were also critically savaged), the decline of MySpace, and Cook's own [[FleetingDemographic teengage fanbase outgrowing him]] all caused his popularity to take a major hit and he became more famous for his hatedom than his fandom. Unlike many of the above examples, Cook does continue to have some moderate commercial success (such as voice-acting in the Disney film ''WesternAnimation/{{Planes}}'') although it is still only a shadow of what he had achieved at his peak just a few years before.
* JeffDunham was once hugely popular with tons of merchandise and was praised for bringing new life into ventriloquism. Now he's mostly just remembered for his overreliance on stereotypes and rehashed material. Whenever he's brought up nowadays, it's usually in the form of a TakeThat.
** His specials have been moved from Comedy Central to CMT, like the Blue Collar Tour before them. The televisual equivalent of going from Broadway to Branson.
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