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'''Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol''' (April 1, 1809–March 4, 1852) was a Russian-language writer of Ukrainian origin. Although his early works were heavily influenced by his Ukrainian heritage and upbringing, Gogol wrote in Russian and his works belong to the tradition of Russian literature.

The novel ''Literature/DeadSouls'' (1842), the play ''Revizor'' (''The Government Inspector'' or ''The Inspector General'') (1836, 1842), and the short stories "The Overcoat" (1842) and "The Nose" (1835/36) count among his masterpieces. His works are highly allegorical and, especially in the case of his short stories like "The Overcoat" and "The Nose", are early examples of MagicalRealism with Surrealist influences. {{Cossacks}} are major figures in several of works, including ''Taras Bulba'' and ''A Terrible Vengeance.''

!! Works on the wiki:
* ''Literature/DeadSouls''
* "Literature/DiaryOfAMadman"
* ''Theatre/TheInspectorGeneral''
* "Literature/ATerribleVengeance"

!!Other works contain examples of:

* AnimateBodyParts: "The Nose" is about a man whose nose flees and disguises itself as a human. It should be mentioned that the Russian name of the story, "Nos", is the Russian word for "dream" backwards.
* GenreShift: "The Overcoat" is set in nineteenth-century Russia and appears to have no elements of the supernatural at all. Then, in the last few pages, [[spoiler:the main character dies and comes back as a zombie]].
* InvoluntaryDance: The end of "The Lost Letter": the only thing that remains following his ordeal is the fact that once a year, on the date he met the group of demons, his wife has an uncontrollable urge to dance and does, with no way of stopping her.
* LivingApart: Kovaliov's nose in "The Nose".
* TheNoseless: "The Nose" is about a man who ends up noseless and finds out that his nose has taken a life of its own and run away, wearing a nice uniform.
* OneSteveLimit: Averted in "The Tale of How Ivan Ivanovich Quarreled with Ivan Nikiforovich", depending on how much weight you give to the fact that they have different patronymics.
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