CowboyBebopAtHisComputer shows us that fact-checking is for Jabronis.

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* The book ''The Complete Idiot's Guide to ProfessionalWrestling'' is filled with this type of error, leading many [[SmartMark smarks]] to claim it's "by complete idiots, for complete idiots". As just one example, the real name of wrestler The Rock (Wrestling/DwayneJohnson) is given as ''Rocky Melvin'', and Wrestling/OwenHart's finishing move is said to be a dropkick. Surprisingly, late wrestler and wrestling manager Wrestling/CaptainLouAlbano was one of the co-authors (the other was ''boxing'' expert Bert Sugar); however, as anybody who met Albano in person or seen him on TV will attest, he was a real life {{cloudcuckoolander}}, so it's not all that shocking that he could screw things up this badly. There was a second edition of the book that updated some information and corrected some of the errors but only replaced those with ''new ones''.
* The documentary (which means that they should've had all the time in the world to do the research, which makes it even funnier) ''Exposed! Pro Wrestling's Greatest Secrets'' reveals some secrets that every [[SmartMark knowledgeable wrestling fan]] already knew (the matches are predetermined, and we must [[SeriousBusiness wear masks to discuss this, since our lives could be at risk]]), and some they didn't [[BlatantLies because no pro wrestling federation has]] ''[[BlatantLies ever]]'' [[BlatantLies used them]]. Two words: Stunt Granny. This example is ironic for two reasons: Wrestling/HarleyRace was featured as the booker in the documentary and the production company behind the documentary (Nash Entertainment) was also responsible for the excellent ''Magic's Biggest Secrets Finally Revealed'' series.
* Following the Wrestling/ChrisBenoit murders in 2007, ''The Today Show'' did a report on wrestlers who died young. One of the reports said that Owen Hart died from a heart attack. For the uninitiated, Owen actually fell to his death while preparing for an entrance that would see him rappelling from the rafters into the ring at a pay-per-view event. It's only by sheer coincidence that Owen's death wasn't seen on TV because the [[Wrestling/{{WWE}} WWF]] aired a backstage interview during the moment that it happened. It was a major news story and you'd ''think'' that it might stick out enough for them to get the cause of death right, but apparently not. On that same broadcast, they broadcasted Owen's face on [[Wrestling/DaveyBoySmith The British Bulldog]]'s profile.
** Also, Nancy Grace mentioned something about Benoit "being demoted from the Four Horsemen to Raw". The Horsemen, of course, were a stable that broke up once and for all in 1999, and ''[[Wrestling/WWERaw Raw]]'' is Wrestling/{{WWE}}'s top brand. Here's the actual quote:
--->'''Nancy Grace''': "Mr. [[Wrestling/BretHart [Bret] Hart]], question. Regarding [Wrestling/ChrisBenoit's] career, I know that he had gone from the elite, one of the Four Horsemen, down to Raw. And that's a little bit of a demotion. How badly do you think he took that?"
** Grace also featured a list of wrestlers who died of drug induced and/or non-accidental causes during one of her shows. The list not only included the aforementioned Owen Hart, but also Wrestling/BruiserBrody (who was killed although his killer claimed self-defense and was acquited on those grounds), Marianna Komlos (a.k.a. Mrs. Cleavage), who died of breast cancer and had ''never'' wrestled in a match, Wrestling/JunkyardDog and Joey Marella (who both died in car accidents), and Wrestling/AndreTheGiant, who died of heart ''failure'', caused by his Acromegaly (Gigantism).
** Grace mentioned several of these names again (updated to include guys like Wrestling/ChrisCandido, who died of a blood clot following leg surgery, and referee Mark Curtis, who died of stomach cancer) while covering the death of [[Wrestling/UltimateWarrior The Ultimate Warrior]] whom she claimed was a "Top WWE Superstar" at the time of his death, less than 72 hours after he was inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame, an honor for which he appeared on WWE television for the first time in ''years''.
** One of the heads of Creator/TheCW shortly after the Benoit murders claimed that her network wouldn't be troubled by it because "Benoit was never featured on [[Wrestling/WWESmackDown SmackDown]]". Apparently she never watched her own programming, as Benoit had been part of the [=SmackDown=] brand for ''two years'' before being drafted to the Wrestling/{{ECW}} brand, and for several years prior to a jump to ''Raw'' (when The CW was still Creator/{{UPN}}).
* Former WWE play-by-play commentator Wrestling/MikeAdamle is a ''former'' commentator for this exact reason. His very first night on the job, he referred to Wrestling/JeffHardy as "Jeff Harvey", and, after he was assigned to WWE's ECW brand, made a habit out of referring to his partner, Wrestling/{{Tazz}}, as "The Tazz", among other gaffes that showed that he really didn't know a thing about WWE or wrestling in general. The latter, by the way, was a running gag in WWE right up until Tazz left the company, despite the fact that Adamle was [[Memes/ProfessionalWrestling wished well in his future endeavors]] long before Tazz was.
* Muhammad Hassan was a controversial wrestler whose gimmick was that, despite being a born-and-raised American, being of Middle Eastern descent saw him face racism of all kinds on a nearly daily basis following 9/11. In 2005, as part of one of Hassan's last appearances on WWE programming, he called forth a group of men dressed in ski masks to attack Wrestling/TheUndertaker (a segment which had the misfortune of airing on the same day as an actual terrorist attack). In response to the backlash (besides the usual "It was only a 'terrorist attack' because I'm of Middle Eastern descent" defense), Hassan took things a step further and, in an in-ring promo, attacked a writer at ''The New York Post'' for an article in which "Undertaker attacked by Arabs in ski masks" was written. Hassan said of the article: "They were in ski masks! How does he know they were Arab?" As Hassan effectively made that writer and ''The New York Post'' as a whole sound like a bunch of racist bastards, fans seemed to actually take his side... until he intimated that the article proved his point: all Americans hate Middle Easterners (which garnered Hassan a massive amount of heel heat). After that speech, UPN (the network that carried ''[=SmackDown!=]'' at the time) demanded that WWE take Hassan off TV. WWE did this, and following his final match (talked about below), he and his manager Daivari were sent down to developmental territories, where Hassan was eventually released. Many fans believed ''The New York Post'' influenced UPN's decision and really were (or still are) the racist bastards Hassan called them out to be.
** What makes things worse is that Hassan was massively over as a heel, and while his in-ring skill wasn't the greatest, he was improving over time; this actually led him to get a #1 Contender's Match for the World Heavyweight Championship against TheUndertaker at The Great American Bash in 2005. Originally, he was scheduled to ''win'' that match and go up against Wrestling/{{Batista}} at [[Wrestling/SummerSlam SummerSlam]], WWE's second biggest pay-per-view of the year. But when the pressure from UPN forced Hassan off of television, Hassan was booked to lose the match and never appeared on WWE programming ever again, which infuriated many fans who actually ''liked'' Hassan. And for what it's worth, all of the "terrorists" were portrayed by the company's (caucasian) jobbers.
** It's also worth noting that Mark Copani (Hassan) was so disgusted by all this that he retired from wrestling immediately following his release, trying his hand at screenwriting and acting and eventually becoming a schoolteacher. He wouldn't even appear at another wrestling-related event for nearly five years — and even then it was alongside (and probably because of) his good friend and former manager Daivari. To put it in perspective: when [[Wrestling/DwayneJohnson The Rock]] kept WWE and wrestling as a whole at arm's length for seven years in order to establish himself as an actor, he was decried by certain wrestling fans and current WWE talents as a sellout. This guy said to hell with this, only briefly resurfaced five years later at an indie event, and most people are completely sympathetic to him because the politics which killed his once-promising young career were just that obscene.
* Parodied frequently through Wrestling/SantinoMarella, in his {{funny foreigner}} role, such as him calling [[Wrestling/RoddyPiper Rowdy Roddy Piper]] "Rodney the Piper" and Jimmy Kimmel "Jimmeny." His biggest faux pas may be when he messes up all of Wrestling/StoneColdSteveAustin's catchprases, like "open the can of the ass-whip," "stomping a mudpie" and "those are the bottom lines."
* In a ''Time'' web article on bad corporate name changes, WWE was given a spot thanks to its tiff with the World Wildlife Fund. Not head-banging, yet. But then the author said of the reason Linda [=McMahon=] gave: "The comment didn't do much to stamp out persistent rumors that the fights are rigged -- but hey, at least she was honest." Not head-banging in 1969, maybe, but in 2009...
* A college professor got Wrestling/AlSnow's action figure banned from Wal-Mart after interpreting the Head accessory as a metaphor for spousal abuse. The real story is that back in ECW, [[Wrestling/MickFoley Cactus Jack]] told him to get some head in order to get [[IncrediblyLamePun ahead]]; Snow took this advice literally and started carrying around a mannequin head (more specifically, a styling dummy, the type of mannequin head beauty school students use to practice on before moving up to real people's hair).
* Sent up in ''{{Botchamania}}'', where the commentators will note certain match stipulations (title switches, locations, etc.) as being first time appearances. These are immediately followed by contradictory evidence. Wrestling/MichaelCole is infamous for these "Make Up Facts! Sound Smart!" moments.
* Jeremy Piven hosted ''Raw'' alongside Ken Jeong. He referred to [=SummerSlam=] as "[=SummerFest=]".
** A lot of the guest hosts who clearly don't know anything about wrestling were guilty of this. Sharon Osbourne referred to Wrestling/KofiKingston as "Coby" at the beginning of the night.
* During [[Wrestling/HulkHogan Hollywood Hogan]]'s original Wrestling/NewWorldOrder run, [[Wrestling/{{WCW}} Mike Tenay]] referred to his Music/JimiHendrix entrance music ("Voodoo Child") as "Voodoo Chili". To elaborate: Hendrix had a song called "Voodoo Chile" which was kind of a studio blues jam, then later took part of that and adapted it into the more conventional "Voodoo Child (Slight Return)." The latter song was Hogan's entrance music. Tenay not only got the wrong song, but the wrong pronunciation (though many do say Chile as chili).
* Once on CNN's ''Capitol Gang'' show, Margaret Carlson, a respected political journalist, called The Rock "a white skinhead hateful wrestling guy." The Rock is half-black, half-Polynesian (admittedly of a skin tone able to pass for "well tanned"), and at the time was not bald. Apparently no one informed her of this, because a week later she was in the pages of ''Time Magazine'' writing that The Rock was "anti-woman, anti-gay, anti-black, with language so coarse and vulgar that I can't repeat it here."
* When reviewing WWE Money in the Bank 2010, one journalist said of the Divas' Championship match, "typical diva match, Alicia wins by cheating, let's move on". He clearly did not watch the match because what made the match stand out was the fact that Wrestling/AliciaFox won cleanly ''without'' cheating.
* During the Brie Bella vs. Wrestling/KellyKelly match on the "Power to the People" episode of ''Raw'', Michael Cole constantly referred to Kelly as a "former champion hoping to regain her title tonight". And after the match Kelly cut a tearful promo about winning ''her first title''.
* TNA's Velvet Sky spoke in a interview about how happy she was to be in a company that didn't stick her in bra and panties matches, trying to take a shot at WWE. Except WWE has not had a bra and panties match since 2007 and what does Velvet do the ''Impact!'' after the interview? Get publicly stripped to her underwear during a segment.
* A recurring goof in anything that parodies wrestling: there will almost certainly be a move incorrectly referred to as a "body slam". Suplex? BODY SLAM. Flying splash? BODY SLAM. Clothesline? BODY SLAM.
** For the uninitiated, a body slam (more commonly referred to as a "scoop slam" in modern WWE) is a specific wrestling move and doesn't just generically refer to someone getting slammed. This error even happens in wrestling via commentary member Michael Cole (who is no stranger to messing up his calls), where he frequently refers to Randy Orton's signature snap powerslam as a scoop slam.
** Something similar comes up in discussions of WCW, as commentator Tony Schiavone was known to call a lot of different moves as a "sidewalk slam". Thus, it was a common joke among Smarks that ''every'' move is a sidewalk slam to Schiavone.
** Spanish TV was guilty of this during its short broadcasting of Wrestling/MichinokuProWrestling in 2007. The commentators (who evidently didn't have a clue about the business and treated the show more like a carnival than a wrestling show) unceasingly listed as "Michinoku Driver" virtually each flashy move featured in the matches, like hurricanranas and suicide dives. Amusingly enough, the real Michinoku Driver (a double underhook brainbuster) has never been used in M-Pro since the '90s.
*** This appears to be bizarrely common in Spanish sport TV, as shown in the last World Judo Championship. Again, the commentators labelled every move (even non-throwing ones) as an "uchi mata", which is a very specific judo throw.
** During the infamous Heroes of Wrestling pay-per-view in 1999, Randy Rosenbloom incorrectly called the dropkick the "flying leg kick" and the "leg drop".
* When WWE held a press conference to officially announce that [[Wrestling/WrestleMania WrestleMania 29]] would be in New Jersey, ''New York Post'' writer Phil Mushnick (who previously criticized wrestling in 1997 and got promptly chewed out on WWE television by Wrestling/JimCornette in a shoot) wrote an article about it filled with inaccuracies, such as suggesting that [[Wrestling/DwayneJohnson Dwayne Johnson]] "resurrect that bit when he smacks a male wrestler over the head with a chair, then smacks a female wrestler over the head with a chair, and they both pass out, face-down, in each other’s crotches, simulating simultaneous oral sex — while The Rock winks and smiles."... He ''almost'' got it right, if he was referring to The Rock and Wrestling/{{Lita}} vs. Wrestling/TripleH and Wrestling/TrishStratus match in [[http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x20dfw_lita-the-rock-vs-triple-h-trish-str_sport an episode of Raw in 2000]]. However, the female wrestlers didn't receive a chair shot during the match.
* Within wrestling itself (similar to the "body slam" example above) there are an unusually large number of commentators and columnists who don't know the difference between a headscissor takedown, Hurricanrana and Frankensteiner and will use the two interchangeably. For the record:
** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8QPGODIckcE Headscissor takedown]]. Though if you want to get technical, a headscissor takedown is when the attacker jumps straight up, applies a headscissor to the defender and rolls him to the mat. The more commonly seen spinning version is a ''flying'' headscissor takedown. To make it worse, some commentators now call the move a "headscissors." A headscissors is a wear-down submission hold, not a flying move or takeover of any kind.
** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oNqhEXoJcjQ Hurricanrana]]. The Hurricanrana is specifically ''only'' the move where the attacker flips straight backwards and takes the defender over into a pin. If the attacker swings to the side, it's a headscissor takedown variant. Diving and corner variations exist but the positioning remains the same. The move was named after luchador [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huracan_Ramirez Huracán Ramírez]]. Also, it was spelled ''huracarrana'' for years, until the "Hurricanrana" spelling became so prevalent it became accepted.
** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cnmTwv_3A6k Frankensteiner]]. Named by Wrestling/ScottSteiner, who brought the move to popularity in the late '80s and early '90s. The Frankensteiner is almost identical to the Hurricanrana, but is traditionally sold as an impact maneuver with the opponent's head and neck being driven into the mat, as opposed to a the Hurricanrana which is more of a fancy pinning combination.
*** One ''Diva Dirt'' writer took this to a new low by referring to a Victory Roll as a "reverse Frankensteiner". Even more {{egregious}} since the Victory Roll was around for decades before the Frankensteiner was even invented, and because there actually is a [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ensMvpB6THw reverse Frankensteiner]].
* Editors of wrestling books, even if the authors know better, ''love'' changing text into saying WCW stands for World Class Wrestling as opposed to the correct World Championship Wrestling. Why? Who knows.