Remember, a CentralTheme is not the same as AnAesop; a theme is a question, idea, topic or concept that the text explores, while an Aesop is a conclusion the author reaches about the theme. As such, you should avoid phrasing your examples as conclusions.
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* ''ThreeHundred'': No one man is above anyone else.
* ''ComicBook/AlbedoErmaFelnaEDF'': The whole story ask the following question: What could happen if you decide to give animals the same sentience, emotions and quirks like the ones shared by the human race? The answer is basically the animals will still do the same things the humans do, complete with wars, racism and even ''genocide''.
** Also, '''WarIsHell''', period.
* ''ComicBook/AllFallDown'': Bad things happen. You ''deal'' with them, because they're not just going to fix themselves.
* ''ComicBook/AstroCity'': The ordinariness of the extraordinary.
* ''ComicBook/AvengersAcademy'': Choosing to do the right thing, even if other options are easier.
** Also, acknowledging and learning from past tragedies without letting them define you.
* The three different series of ''Comicbook/{{Batgirl}}'' each have three different overarching themes:
** The [[ComicBook/{{Batgirl 2000}} 2000-2006 series]] featuring Cassandra Cain is about innocence and redemption; specifically, about how innocence can be corrupted and what is required to redeem someone for the wrongs they've done in the past.
** The [[ComicBook/{{Batgirl 2009}} 2009-2011 series]] featuring Stephanie Brown is about heroism, and what it takes to be a hero even if no one else thinks you're capable of it.
** The post {{New 52}} series ([[ComicBook/{{Batgirl 2011}} 2011-present]]) featuring Barbara Gordon is about healing the wounds of the past, whether physical, emotional or psychological.
* ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'': How the traumas of the past affect the choices we make, and thus how they shape us into the people we are in the present.
** In particular, practically every member of Batman's Rogue's Gallery either reflects a part of Batman himself and/or like him has an over-arching trauma that has shaped their lives ever since -- except where he has used his trauma to make himself a better man by defending the innocent to try and prevent what happened to him from happening to others, they have succumbed to despair and evil and use their traumas as an excuse to hurt others.
* ''ComicBook/TheBoys'': The pathetic inadequacies of superheroes and the futility of relying on them (both in-universe and, in a meta-sense, as wish-fulfillment figures) to solve the problems of a complex world.
** Alternatively, horrible ways in which corporate greed destroys everything by applying half-baked, poorly put together, but easily marketable and profitable solutions to complex problems and using corruption to make them first choice options instead of something that would actually work.
* ''CaptainAmerica'': Is truth, justice and the American way old-fashioned?
* ''TheDarkKnightReturns'': To bring justice, do you have to operate outside the law, or become enslaved by it?
* ''ComicsBook/DoctorStrange'' - The self-defeating nature of {{Pride}} and superiority of knowledge and wits over raw power.
** ''ComicsBook/DoctorStrange and SelfDemonstrating/DoctorDoom: Triumph and Torment'': There is a price for every victory.
* WarrenEllis' run on [[{{Gen13}} DV8]]: A really dark take on PowerOfFriendship - World is a harsh place you won't survive in without real friends.
* ''Comicbook/FantasticFour'': The nature of family.
** Also the sheer bizarre wonderfulness of the universe and the dangers -- and opportunities -- that exploring it can hold.
* ''ComicBook/FlexMentallo'': Don't throw away things you love because they are seen as immature, silly or stupid.
* ''ComicBook/FromHell'': The fundamental interconnections that exist between everything and everyone, and how [[UsefulNotes/JackTheRipper a serial killer]] is both a product of society and culture as a whole and something which goes on to shape that society further.
* The work of GeoffJohns frequently revolves around themes such as family, managing your emotions and finding your place in the world, with the theme corresponding to the overall motif or theme of the character(s) he's writing for. For example:
** His ''ComicBook/GreenLantern'' run spanning pre- and post-New52 revolves around overcoming fear and accepting your emotions.
** His ''ComicBook/JusticeSocietyOfAmerica'' run focuses on family.
** His ''ComicBook/TheFlash'' run explores the character's need to 'slow down' (i.e. take time out every now and again).
** His ''ComicBook/{{Aquaman}}'' run looks at what it is to be an outsider
* ''ComicBook/GlobalFrequency'': The extraordinary things that ordinary people can do if given the chance and resources to do them. Also, how no skill or ability is truly worthless, and how even the most seemingly trivial or obscure forms of knowledge can, if applied in the correct setting, do amazing things.
* ''IncredibleHercules'': What does it really mean to be a god?
* ''ComicBook/{{Irredeemable}}'': How far a man has to go to [[MoralEventHorizon become truly irredeemable]]?
** ''Incorruptible'': What it takes to [[HeelFaceTurn turn to the side of angels]] and stay on it?
* ''ComicBook/JourneyIntoMystery'', Creator/KieronGillen run: Is true change really possible? Or do [[StatusQuoIsGod all things have to revert to their former state sooner or later]]?
* ''ComicBook/JudgeDredd'': The law, no matter how harsh, really is there for your protection.
** Alternatively, the extremes that unthinking, unyielding and over-oppressive fascist law-enforcement can go to... and the kind of society that would need this kind of law-enforcement in order to function.
* ''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke'':
** One bad day can drive a normal man to madness, but we have the choice to stay sane when confronted with tragedy and suffering. Truly evil people are often convinced that ''everyone'' is as bad as they are, and they'll go to extreme lengths to prove it. That doesn't make it true.
** Can you actually help the mentally ill by treating them? If you can't treat them and if you keep them them alive knowing they will keep killing, can TheHero be considered saner than the villain who realizes the absurdity of the situation?
* ''ComicBook/KingdomCome'': What exactly ''are'' the differences between TheCape and the NinetiesAntiHero?
* ''ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'': Culture is both a reflection of the society and context in which it creates and an expression of its genius and ambition. Art is not only a product of life, but something which in turn shapes and influences society itself and its very bad when culture merely regurgitates old tropes and ideas out of empty nostalgia and lack of creativity.
** The Nemo Trilogy deals with the change in mores from 19th Century Science Fiction (centered on exploration, searching for new lands, filled with mystery and adventure) to 20th Century Science Fiction (centered on limits, horror of discovery, filled with doubt and fear).
* ''ComicBook/LexLuthorManOfSteel'': Might even a monster be convinced he's the hero of his own story?
* ''ComicBook/LokiAgentOfAsgard'': How truth can hurt and be used as a weapon.
* ''ComicBook/NemesisTheWarlock'': [[HumansAreFlawed Humans can be bastards]], but don't have to be.
* ''ComicBook/{{Nextwave}}'': When the world is completely insane, the only way to handle it is to go a bit mad yourself.
* ''{{Planetary}}'': The world is wonderful and we should do everything we can to stop anyone who wants to make it mundane and boring.
* ''ComicBook/{{Phonogram}}'': How art influences, inspires and changes but sometimes also destroys it's consumers.
* ''ComicBook/{{Preacher}}'': GodIsEvil. Why else would the world be like ''this?''
* ''RogueTrooper'': WarIsHell
* ''{{Runaways}}'': Creating your own family.
* ''Comicbook/TheSandman'': All things change, all things end. Neither of these is terrible. And there is always more to everything (and everyone) than you expect.
* ''ScottPilgrim'': Fighting for the one you love.
** On a more serious note, learning from the mistakes of your past, accepting your flaws and becoming a better person instead of repeating the same mistakes all over again.
* ''Comicbook/SpiderMan'': With great power comes great responsibility; what it means to have power and to use it in a socially and morally responsible way.
** This theme can be said to apply, to varying degrees, to almost ''any'' superhero story in some shape or form.
** With Spiderman its being a hero even when there is no reward for being one, it won't get bills paid, it won't help your love life and it won't get you fame and respect.
* ''Comicbook/{{Superman}}'': What it means to be a hero, a good person and an inspiration to others -- and how these three qualities are not necessarily the same.
* '' {{Transmetropolitan}}'': The ways in which societies remain the same even in the face of [[TheSingularity inconceivable and massive-scale technological advancement]], particularly with regards to social and political corruption, greed, prejudice, class systems and [[BreadAndCircuses apathy]].
** And, by WordOfGod, the idea that it will always be the people willing to stand up and raise their voices who will change society.
* ''ComicBook/VForVendetta'': What does it mean to have freedom? What price is it worth?
* ''Comicbook/{{Watchmen}}'':
** Also, explicitly: "Who watches the Watchmen?" (Who protects the people who protect us? And if they go wrong, how will we know, and who'll protect us from them?)
** The choice between [[StrawNihilist living without morals]] and [[KnightTemplar letting your morals define you]], and the inevitable pitfalls that come with both choices.
** "Who makes the world?" When even a PhysicalGod doesn't have all the answers, when the "world's smartest man" is filled with doubt and the Presidents and businessmen are equally confused, why do ordinary people keep believing that they are more powerless or that they need heroes?
* ''ComicBook/TheWickedAndTheDivine'': Accodring to WordOfGod, the relationship between art and its creator, how choices and compromises artists make influence their creations, their audience and their very lives.
* ''Comicbook/WonderWoman'': The conflict between the desire for peace and how it may be sometimes necessary to fight in order to ensure it.
* ''Comicbook/XMen'' - Choosing to do the right thing, even when faced with prejudice and injustice. More specifically, having to choose between using your abilities to help mankind and using them to rebel against an oppressive establishment.
** ''[[NewMutants New X-Men: Academy X]]'': People and their rivals probably are NotSoDifferent as they would like to belive.
*** Craig Kyle and Chris Yost's run: InnocenceLost, especially loss of trust in your idols and authorities.
** ''X-Men: Legacy'' vol.2 ([[NewMutants Legion's]] book): Are you really in control of your life? Or are you controlled by your past burdens and people around you?