Fantastic Medicinal Bodily Fluids
A creature or species' body fluids have fantastic healing properties for other species
Needs Examples Up For Grabs

(permanent link) added: 2012-04-15 06:19:12 sponsor: fulltimeD edited by: jormis29 (last reply: 2014-05-18 03:30:10)

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This is often seen in Speculative Fiction where humanity interacts with other species, but it could also happen in Fantasy settings: A creature, or an entire species, possesses remarkable healing abilities due to a particular bodily fluid. Usually this is saliva, but it could be any body fluid, including urine or blood. Very often, the healing factor only works on other species, not their own, though this is not a requirement for the trope.

Psionic powers used to heal or take away pain do not count under this; they are examples of the Empathic Healer.

Sub-Trope of Bizarre Alien Biology.

Compare Swiss Army Tears. Any tear examples should go there.

No Real Life Examples; not because of Squick, but because there ain't no such animal: A fluid can only be an example of this trope if it either comes from a made up creature or demonstrates properties not found in real life substances. Therefore blood from a Half-Human Hybrid, a Unicorn, vampire, or another made up creature would be an example, even if it's only used as an anesthetic. On the other hand, examples of fluids from real lifeforms would count only if the source material attributes fantastic healing properties to them which are not found in Real Life (usually in myth and folklore from cultures and time periods in which the animal, if real, would have been considered quite exotic or even mythical).

Examples:

Anime and Manga

  • In Black Bird, Kyo, a bird demon, licking Misao heals her wounds. Also, Misao's blood can heal demons. the healing can be sexually transmitted as well
  • In Bleach Nel's saliva/drool is capable of healing people from near death.

Comics

  • In an arc of Bloom County, Oliver makes a nearly-magical hair tonic out of cat sweat. It makes balding men grow their hair back overnight.
  • In a Superman: The Animated Series comic book, an element taken from one of Superman's tears saves his cousin Kara from a rare and fatal Kryptonian disease with no Earthly cure.

Film

  • Ponyo from the Miyazaki movie Ponyo on the Cliff by the Sea heals Sousuke's wound by licking it.
  • In the live action film adaptation of Alice in Wonderland the Bandersnatch's saliva is one of the few things that can heal the wounds left by its poison claws.
  • Petes Dragon: There's a whole song about the many uses of various parts of a dragon.
  • Naked Lunch: William Lee trades a typewriter to a rival author with the following comment: "Tom, I've brought you a new typewriter (actually an alien head) which conveniently dispenses two types of intoxicating fluids when it likes what you've written."

Folk Tales

  • In the Russian folk tale about Yeruslan Lazarevich, one of the hero's adventures is about curing his family which was blinded (either by a villain or due to sitting to long in a dark dungeon where said villain threw them). The cure required is the bile of a certain evil king.

Literature

  • Johrlac blood in the InCryptid series is a natural painkiller/antibiotic.
  • In the Harry Potter series, phoenix tears can nullify poisons, cure illnesses, and even reverse death.
  • In the Pit Dragon Chronicles dragon saliva is healing for human wounds and human saliva is healing for dragons wounds. In a subversion, dragon blood is acidic and burns human flesh.
  • In the Star Wars Expanded Universe, both bacta and kolto are derived from secretions of specific species.
  • Adventures of a Demon-Hunting Soccer Mom: ground saints' bones can reverse death. Not a fluid but otherwise fits the trope.

Live-Action Television

  • Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. "T.A.H.I.T.I." reveals that agent Coulson was resurrected by a drug called GH.325, derived from the bodily fluids of a blue humanoid corpse of unknown origin, code named G.H. It is then used to heal Skye's fatal bullet wounds.
  • Earth 2: The Grendlers- squat, roughly humanoid primitive scavengers and traders on Planet G889- possess saliva with healing properties so powerful it can cure humans of basically anything.
  • Star Trek: Enterprise "Dawn": Trip, stranded on a hostile planet with an Arkonian pilot, discovers that Arkonian saliva can heal wounds rapidly.
    • Dr. Phlox took advantage of the medicinal properties of several nonsentient alien species in his sickbay.
  • In an episode of the Nineties version of The Outer Limits, the Grell, a race of humanoid aliens held in slavery by humanity on Earth, have saliva with rapid healing properties.
  • Battlestar Galactica (Reimagined): Hera's hybrid blood temporarily cures Roslin's cancer.
  • Farscape "...Different Destinations": Fellip urine has healing properties (or at least, can numb pain). Naturally, this being Farscape, it's played for laughs.
    • Note that the above example of a fluid's use as a simple anesthetic counts only because there is no such thing in Real Life as a Fellip.
    • The Virtual Zhaan's "milk" in the episode "John Quixote"; however, this is all part of a virtual reality game and may not be based in the reality of the show's setting.
  • 1970's show The Immortal. A man discovers that his blood not only makes him immortal but can cure diseases in any person it's transfused into.
  • The blood from vampires in True Blood. In addition to being an addictive psychoactive stimulant/steroid/win-button, it can be ingested by injured humans to bring them back from the brink of death.
  • Forever Knight: "Fever" had a undeadly virus going about the vampire community, originally contracted by sucking the blood of a lab rat which had been used to test an HIV vaccine, can only be cured by sucking the blood of an AIDS victim.
  • In the series Lexx, protoblood (implied to be produced by the alien Insects) can reanimate the dead as servants of His Divine Shadow.

Mythology and Religion

  • The Celts had a belief in the healing power of saliva, which is where the idea of "kiss it better" originates.
  • According to Mythology, phoenix tears are a universal panacea and can even reverse death.

Tabletop Games

  • In Vampire: The Requiem and precursor Vampire: The Masquerade, vampire saliva can heal skin punctures and remove the signs of fang puncture marks. I may be wrong, but Hunter: The Vigil has one group of hunters, the Cheiron Group, use stolen vampire saliva glands grafted to agents to help them heal.

Various

  • Vampire saliva is a natural coagulant and helps the puncture wounds close in various media.
  • Unicorn blood is held to have healing properties in several different works and myths.

Video Games

  • In Illusion of Gaia, unspecified body fluids from the Sand Fanger are thought to cure diseases. Lance uses some to cure his father's memory loss.

Webcomics

  • Starslip parodies this. Cirbozoids, due to their Bizarre Alien Biology, produce a mind-bogglingly wide variety of secretions with an equally wide variety of uses. For any medical condition in other species (or for that matter, any non-medical emergency), the Cirbozoids secrete something that serves as an at least temporary solution.

Western Animation

  • Adventure Time: The episode "Another Way" features Finn on a quest to use a giant's tears to heal his wounds—they can apparently also turn objects into sentient beings.
  • In The Fairly OddParents, drinking fairy sweat temporarily gives the ability to make one wish and have it come true.
  • In the American Dad! episode, "Big Trouble in Little Langley", Francine's mother, Ma Ma Ling, uses monkey dung to treat Haley's cold sore, which she calls "whore lip". It does not seem to actually work, though.
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