Created By: fulltimeD on April 15, 2012 Last Edited By: jormis29 on August 1, 2014

Fantastic Medicinal Bodily Fluids

A creature or species\' body fluids have fantastic healing properties for other species

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
This is often seen in Speculative Fiction where humanity interacts with other species, but it could also happen in Fantasy settings: A creature, or an entire species, possesses remarkable healing abilities due to a particular bodily fluid. Usually this is saliva, but it could be any body fluid, including urine or blood. Very often, the healing factor only works on other species, not their own, though this is not a requirement for the trope.

Psionic powers used to heal or take away pain do not count under this; they are examples of the Empathic Healer.

Sub-Trope of Bizarre Alien Biology.

Compare Swiss Army Tears. Any tear examples should go there.

No Real Life Examples; not because of Squick, but because there ain't no such animal: A fluid can only be an example of this trope if it either comes from a made up creature or demonstrates properties not found in real life substances. Therefore blood from a Half-Human Hybrid, a Unicorn, vampire, or another made up creature would be an example, even if it's only used as an anesthetic. On the other hand, examples of fluids from real lifeforms would count only if the source material attributes fantastic healing properties to them which are not found in Real Life (usually in myth and folklore from cultures and time periods in which the animal, if real, would have been considered quite exotic or even mythical).

Examples:

Anime and Manga

  • In Black Bird, Kyo, a bird demon, licking Misao heals her wounds. Also, Misao's blood can heal demons. the healing can be sexually transmitted as well
  • In Bleach Nel's saliva/drool is capable of healing people from near death.

Comics

  • In an arc of Bloom County, Oliver makes a nearly-magical hair tonic out of cat sweat. It makes balding men grow their hair back overnight.
  • In a Superman: The Animated Series comic book, an element taken from one of Superman's tears saves his cousin Kara from a rare and fatal Kryptonian disease with no Earthly cure.

Film

  • Ponyo from the Miyazaki movie Ponyo on the Cliff by the Sea heals Sousuke's wound by licking it.
  • In the live action film adaptation of Alice in Wonderland the Bandersnatch's saliva is one of the few things that can heal the wounds left by its poison claws.
  • Pete's Dragon: There's a whole song about the many uses of various parts of a dragon.
  • Naked Lunch: William Lee trades a typewriter to a rival author with the following comment: "Tom, I've brought you a new typewriter (actually an alien head) which conveniently dispenses two types of intoxicating fluids when it likes what you've written."

Folk Tales

  • In the Russian folk tale about Yeruslan Lazarevich, one of the hero's adventures is about curing his family which was blinded (either by a villain or due to sitting to long in a dark dungeon where said villain threw them). The cure required is the bile of a certain evil king.

Literature

  • Johrlac blood in the InCryptid series is a natural painkiller/antibiotic.
  • In the Harry Potter series, phoenix tears can nullify poisons, cure illnesses, and even reverse death.
  • In the Pit Dragon Chronicles dragon saliva is healing for human wounds and human saliva is healing for dragons wounds. In a subversion, dragon blood is acidic and burns human flesh.
  • In the Star Wars Expanded Universe, both bacta and kolto are derived from secretions of specific species.
  • Adventures of a Demon-Hunting Soccer Mom: ground saints' bones can reverse death. Not a fluid but otherwise fits the trope.

Live-Action Television

  • Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. "T.A.H.I.T.I." reveals that agent Coulson was resurrected by a drug called GH.325, derived from the bodily fluids of a blue humanoid corpse of unknown origin, code named G.H. It is then used to heal Skye's fatal bullet wounds.
  • Earth 2: The Grendlers- squat, roughly humanoid primitive scavengers and traders on Planet G889- possess saliva with healing properties so powerful it can cure humans of basically anything.
  • Star Trek: Enterprise "Dawn": Trip, stranded on a hostile planet with an Arkonian pilot, discovers that Arkonian saliva can heal wounds rapidly.
    • Dr. Phlox took advantage of the medicinal properties of several nonsentient alien species in his sickbay.
  • In an episode of the Nineties version of The Outer Limits, the Grell, a race of humanoid aliens held in slavery by humanity on Earth, have saliva with rapid healing properties.
  • Battlestar Galactica (Reimagined): Hera's hybrid blood temporarily cures Roslin's cancer.
  • Farscape "...Different Destinations": Fellip urine has healing properties (or at least, can numb pain). Naturally, this being Farscape, it's played for laughs.
    • Note that the above example of a fluid's use as a simple anesthetic counts only because there is no such thing in Real Life as a Fellip.
    • The Virtual Zhaan's "milk" in the episode "John Quixote"; however, this is all part of a virtual reality game and may not be based in the reality of the show's setting.
  • 1970's show The Immortal. A man discovers that his blood not only makes him immortal but can cure diseases in any person it's transfused into.
  • The blood from vampires in True Blood. In addition to being an addictive psychoactive stimulant/steroid/win-button, it can be ingested by injured humans to bring them back from the brink of death.
  • Forever Knight: "Fever" had a undeadly virus going about the vampire community, originally contracted by sucking the blood of a lab rat which had been used to test an HIV vaccine, can only be cured by sucking the blood of an AIDS victim.
  • In the series Lexx, protoblood (implied to be produced by the alien Insects) can reanimate the dead as servants of His Divine Shadow.

Mythology and Religion

  • The Celts had a belief in the healing power of saliva, which is where the idea of "kiss it better" originates.
  • According to Mythology, phoenix tears are a universal panacea and can even reverse death.

Tabletop Games

  • In Vampire: The Requiem and precursor Vampire: The Masquerade, vampire saliva can heal skin punctures and remove the signs of fang puncture marks. I may be wrong, but Hunter: The Vigil has one group of hunters, the Cheiron Group, use stolen vampire saliva glands grafted to agents to help them heal.

Various

  • Vampire saliva is a natural coagulant and helps the puncture wounds close in various media.
  • Unicorn blood is held to have healing properties in several different works and myths.

Video Games

  • In Illusion of Gaia, unspecified body fluids from the Sand Fanger are thought to cure diseases. Lance uses some to cure his father's memory loss.

Webcomics

  • Starslip parodies this. Cirbozoids, due to their Bizarre Alien Biology, produce a mind-bogglingly wide variety of secretions with an equally wide variety of uses. For any medical condition in other species (or for that matter, any non-medical emergency), the Cirbozoids secrete something that serves as an at least temporary solution.

Western Animation

  • Adventure Time: The episode "Another Way" features Finn on a quest to use a giant's tears to heal his wounds—they can apparently also turn objects into sentient beings.
  • In The Fairly OddParents, drinking fairy sweat temporarily gives the ability to make one wish and have it come true.
  • In the American Dad! episode, "Big Trouble in Little Langley", Francine's mother, Ma Ma Ling, uses monkey dung to treat Haley's cold sore, which she calls "whore lip". It does not seem to actually work, though.
Community Feedback Replies: 94
  • April 15, 2012
    Mauri
    Real life Saliva as well as Tears helps to disinfect a wound.
  • April 15, 2012
    fulltimeD
    True, but I'm not really sure if we should include that, as this trope usually describes a fluid that comes from one creature to heal another creature. The whole point of the trope is the fantastic healing ability, something not seen in real life organisms.
  • April 15, 2012
    Reiizm
    Ponyo from the Miyazaki movie Ponyo heals sousuke's wound by licking it.

  • April 15, 2012
    ParadiscaCorbasi
    • Johrlac blood in the In Cryptid series is a natural painkiller/antibiotic.
    • Vampire saliva is a natural coagulant and helps the puncture wounds close in various media.
  • April 15, 2012
    Dawnwing
    • In the Harry Potter series, phoenix tears can heal anything.
  • April 15, 2012
    StevenT
    • In The Fairly OddParents, drinking fairy sweat temporarily gives the ability to make one wish and have it come true.
  • April 15, 2012
    Dacilriel
    Compare Swiss Army Tears. Any tear examples should go there.

    Unicorn blood is held to have healing properties in several different works and myths.

    In the Pit Dragon Chronicles dragon saliva is healing for human wounds and human saliva is healing for dragons wounds. In a subversion, dragon blood is acidic and burns human flesh.
  • April 15, 2012
    Allronix
    Real Life: In traditional Chinese medicine, animal parts and fluids are used to cure various ailments. Unfortunately, this puts a high bounty on several endangered species.
  • April 15, 2012
    Bisected8
    • In Bleach Nel's saliva/drool is capable of healing people from near death.
  • April 15, 2012
    pawsplay
    In the Star Wars EU, both bacta and kolto are derived from secretions of specific species.
  • April 15, 2012
    HaggisMcCrablice
    In a Superman The Animated Series comic book, an element taken from one of Superman's tears saves his cousin Kara from a rare and fatal Kryptonian disease with no Earthly cure.

    In an American Dad episode, Francine's mother uses animal feces to treat Haley's herpes, which she calls "whore mouth".
  • April 15, 2012
    Quatic
    Chuck Norris's tears cure cancer. Too bad he never cries.
  • April 15, 2012
    Astaroth
    The Celts had a belief in the healing power of saliva, which is where the idea of 'kiss it better' originates.
  • April 16, 2012
    randomsurfer
    Forever Knight: a undeadly virus going about the vampire community, originally contracted by sucking the blood of a lab rat which had been used to test an HIV vaccine, can only be cured by sucking the blood of an AIDS victim.
  • April 16, 2012
    reub2000
    Can we say No Real Life Examples Please for this one? Don't really want to know about some remedy that supposedly uses bodily fluids?
  • April 16, 2012
    fulltimeD
    I usually reserve No Real Life Examples for politically, religiously or culturally contested subjects. This is hardly political.
  • April 16, 2012
    reub2000
    No Real Life Examples Please can be added for any reason. A couple of the tropes listed there are there because Real Life exaples would contain squick. I'm also suggesting it because I believe it could lead to people listing their favorite quakery.
  • April 16, 2012
    HumanaUox
    Adventure Time: The episode "Another Way" features Finn on a quest to use a giant's tears to heal his wounds--they can apparently also turn objects into sentient beings.
  • April 16, 2012
    Andygal
    I don't think there's a reason for No Real Life Examples, if any of the examples get too squicky somebody can edit them to tone it down.

    oh and many species' saliva actually contains some weak antiseptics, thus why many animals will lick their wounds.
  • April 16, 2012
    KTera
    • In Illusion Of Gaia, unspecified body fluids from the Sand Fanger are thought to cure diseases. Lance uses some to cure his father's memory loss.
  • April 16, 2012
    TheNinth
    According to Mythology and JK Rowling, phoenix tears can nullify poisons, cure illnesses, and even reverse death.

    White Wolf Games considers werewolf blood to be more nourishing to vampires.

    If we wanted to broaden this to include non-healing properties, a few different myth systems consider werewolf blood toxic to vampires.
  • April 16, 2012
    MetaFour
    • Starslip parodies this. Cirbozoids, due to their Bizarre Alien Biology, produce a mind-bogglingly wide variety of secretions with an equally wide variety of uses. For any medical condition in other species (or for that matter, any non-medical emergency), the Cirbozoids secrete something that serves as an at least temporary solution.
  • April 16, 2012
    fulltimeD
    No substance on Earth actually does this. There can't be Real Life Examples by default.
  • April 16, 2012
    HaggisMcCrablice
    Apparently a growing new health fad in China is boiling eggs in the urine of young boys. Insert R Kelly joke here...nnnnnnnnnow.
  • April 17, 2012
    CharacterInWhite
    • The blood from vampires in True Blood. In addition to being an addictive psychoactive stimulant/steroid/win-button, it can be ingested by injured humans to bring them back from the brink of death.
  • April 17, 2012
    animeg3282
    In Black Bird Kyo, a bird demon, licking Misao heals her wounds. Also, Misao's blood can heal demons. the healing can be sexually transmitted as well
  • April 17, 2012
    fulltimeD
    Would people please stop adding examples from Homeopathy? This trope has nothing to do with Homeopathy or any other Pseudoscience, Quackery, or other scam. This trope is specific to sci-fi or fantasy settings so I don't see why we should have Real Life examples anyway, but even if Real Life examples of this existed, the trope still would not cover "boiling eggs in young boys' urine" for example, because of the lack of evidence of any medicinal value.
  • April 17, 2012
    Dacilriel
    If you want to limit the trope to sci-fi/fantasy examples that's fine, but as there is real science behind Homeopathy, please do not lump it together with pseudoscience.

    That said, a fad of urine-boiled-eggs does not count as real Homeopathy.
  • April 17, 2012
    fulltimeD
    What real science is there behind homeopathy?
  • April 17, 2012
    zarpaulus
    ^ Sorry, homeopathy is the specific misbelief that solutions diluted hundreds of times over are more effective medicine than the correct concentrations.

    This stuff, would be more like "folk medicine".
  • April 17, 2012
    Earnest
    • In Vampire The Requiem and precursor Vampire The Masquerade, vampire saliva can heal skin punctures and remove the signs of fang puncture marks. I may be wrong, but Hunter The Vigil has one group of hunters, the Cheiron Group, use stolen vampire saliva glands grafted to agents to help them heal.
  • April 17, 2012
    reub2000
    The eggs in urine thing seems to be more something they enjoy in parts of China. A few less than scrupulous vendors might be claiming health benefits. Anyways, No Real Life Examples includes Cats Are Snarkers, because get this, cat's can't talk. If it's impossible in Real Life, then there is no reason to not apply the tag by default.
  • April 18, 2012
    Arivne
    Live Action TV
    • 1970's show The Immortal. A man discovers that his blood not only makes him immortal but can cure diseases in any person it's transfused into.
  • April 18, 2012
    fulltimeD
    ^Agreed, Reub. Unlike certain other tropes on this wiki, this one is purely fiction-only until and unless we discover a creature with bodily fluids that are literal panaceas.
  • April 18, 2012
    fulltimeD
    (redacted)
  • April 18, 2012
    Duncan
    • In an arc of Bloom County, Oliver makes a nearly-magical hair tonic out of cat sweat. It makes balding men grow their hair back overnight.
  • April 18, 2012
    zarpaulus
    • In the most recent film adaptation of Alice In Wonderland the Bandersnatch's saliva is one of the few things that can heal the wounds left by its poison claws.
  • April 19, 2012
    HaggisMcCrablice
    Snake venom is often harvested and used in medicines as an anticoagulant, which was an important plot point in the seventies horror film Sssssss.
  • April 20, 2012
    ParadiscaCorbasi
  • April 22, 2012
    Omeganian
    In the Russian folk tale about Yeruslan Lazarevich, one of the hero's adventures is about curing his family which was blinded (either by a villain or due to sitting to long in a dark dungeon where said villain threw them). The cure required is the bile of a certain evil king.
  • April 22, 2012
    TwoGunAngel
    Also (kinda pointing out the Elephant In The Living Room here), we'll want to keep perverted examples to a minimum here. The Power Perversion Potential for this trope is pretty big, particularly with the "any body fluids" thing. Though outside of porn (which isn't really allowed here anymore due to the new content policy), I can't really name a single example of sexual fluids being used for medicinal purposes.
  • April 22, 2012
    SeptimusHeap
    Need the healing abilities to be somewhat fictional? There are plenty of Real Life examples otherwise.
  • April 22, 2012
    reub2000
    ^Well that's exactly what we've been discussing.
  • April 22, 2012
    fulltimeD
    ^^ There are probably examples in folklore or mythology of that.

    @Septimus Heap: I don't see how there could be real life examples of this anymore than there can be real life examples of rubber forehead aliens, casual interstellar travel or teleporters and transporters. This is clearly a "fantastic" trope unique to sci fi, fantasy, and mythology/folklore. "Tears and saliva contain weak antiseptics in real life" is NOT this trope: "Vampire/Alien/Unicorn blood cures cancer, heals wounds and/or brings people back to life" IS this trope. Even, say, a Neo-Pagan's ceremonial use of menstrual blood in a healing ritual would be considered "folklore" or possibly "Religion and Mythology" for the purposes of this wiki, not Real Life.
  • April 22, 2012
    fulltimeD
    So, to simplify, because I really could have just said it this way but didn't think of it:

    Made up creatures or made up properties of otherwise real creatures, ONLY.
  • April 22, 2012
    fulltimeD
    "In the Russian folk tale about Yeruslan Lazarevich, one of the hero's adventures is about curing his family which was blinded (either by a villain or due to sitting to long in a dark dungeon where said villain threw them). The cure required is the bile of a certain evil king."

    ^ case in point. Bile is not made up. A (presumably human) evil King is not a made up creature. But Bile does not have healing properties in Real L Ife, thus this is an example of this trope.

    Similarly...

    Blood is a real substance, but Unicorns are made up creatures. Thus, Unicorn Blood with healing properties, whether fantastic (like resurrecting the dead) or relatively mundane (disinfecting a wound) would also count as an example.

    However, harvesting snake venom for its anti-coagulant properties isn't an example of this trope. It IS, however, an example of Real Life medical science.

    I COULD see compromising and adding a Real Life section, the problem with that is I don't trust people to discriminate between science and pseudoscience, and I don't want this trope to become weighed down by all manner of pseudoscience. I could see, for example, including the Snake Venom example (especially as it is touched on in a fictional context in the movie Sssss, as the poster mentions). But by including this, we should NOT be including mistaken beliefs about the bodily fluids of real creatures. That snake venom has anticoagulant properties is a scientific fact. But as some traditional medicine, and not other traditional medicine, has been scientifically researched, not every example from traditional medicine WOULD be a valid real life example. That is why I would prefer to stick with Fictional Examples only and make it clear in the description that this is a "Fantastic" trope dealing with fantastic creatures or made up fantastic properties of real creatures, without real life analogs.

    Sorry for the essay.
  • April 22, 2012
    fulltimeD
    @The Ninth

    RE: Werewold blood toxic to Vampires

    That should probably be a different trope, maybe a subtrope of Alien Blood?
  • April 22, 2012
    SharleeD
    Also from Harry Potter, drinking unicorn blood can preserve life, but at a cost that the life gained is pretty miserable.
  • April 23, 2012
    fulltimeD
    Added "Fantastic" to the title to resolve the Real Life Examples issue. There can be no Real Life examples of anything defined on this wiki as "Fantastic."
  • April 23, 2012
    corpsedoll
    In Neon Genesis Evangelion, the LCL that sustains life within the entry plug (that is described as being identical to amniotic fluid) is the bodily fluid of Lilith, the being that spawned all of humanity.
  • April 24, 2012
    SeptimusHeap
    ^^Why are we bending the name to fit the no Real Life examples?
  • April 24, 2012
    wotnoplot
    Unless we are being prescriptive 'real life' means anything that cures or is believed to cure. Although I'm not advocating killing endangered animals, giving their fluids etc as medicine could have a placebo effect if nothing else...
  • April 24, 2012
    fulltimeD
    @septimus: The trope was never meant to cover Real Life examples, therefor I have made the title more accurate by specifying "fantastic."
  • April 24, 2012
    Koveras
    Don't know if this counts but the "exchange of bodily fluids" is how the Synchronizers' healing technique works in Tsukihime. Said formula includes both the Synchronizers' fluids and others' fluids (if imbibed by or, uh, otherwise injected into them), so both drinking their blood and having sex with them will have healing effect on the other person.
  • April 26, 2012
    aurora369
    Not exactly a cure, but a Laser Guided Amnesia drug is made from vampire saliva in Age Of Aquarius.
  • April 26, 2012
    HyperTurbina
    In the classic tale of Rapunzel, the prince ends up separated from the titular character and is blinded. When they meet each other again, Rapunzel's tears of happiness restore his vision.
  • April 26, 2012
    LordGro
    Not about healing powers, but a desirable power nevertheless:

    Literature:
    • In the medieval German epic Nibelungenlied, the hero Siegfried becomes invulnerable by bathing in a dragon's blood.
  • April 27, 2012
    Arivne
    Tabletop Games
    • Dungeons And Dragons 3rd Edition supplement Creature Collection. The ewe of the Amalthean Ram gives milk that neutralizes non-magical poisons and diseases and heals the wounds of anyone who drinks it.
  • May 10, 2012
    fulltimeD
    Will update with new examples probably this weekend...
  • February 12, 2014
    XFllo
    Up For Grabs/YKTTW Bump.

    Compare Swiss Army Tears. Any tear examples should go there. Yet there are many tear examples in the draft and in the discussion.
  • February 12, 2014
    StarSword
    Literature:
    • In the Destroyermen series, the paste left over from fermenting polta fruit into seep (an alcoholic beverage) is used by the Lemurians as a topical antiseptic and anesthetic. The human destroyermen quickly adopt it into their first aid kits.
  • February 12, 2014
    SharleeD
    Often overlaps with Mainlining The Monster.
  • February 12, 2014
    Chabal2
    • Artemis Fowl: Dwarf saliva is apparently a healing balm (at least against burns).
    • While not a healing fluid, the Venber of Animorphs melt at temperatures above zero, and the resulting fluid acts as a supercoolant. The Venber were hunted to extinction for this, those encountered by the team are some kind of hybrid (that still melts).
    • In Heart Of The Swarm's campaign, one of the possible upgrades for Banelings (mobile, acid-filled sacs) is to heal nearby troops with splashed acid when they explode.

  • February 12, 2014
    stupac85
    In The Vampire Diaries, a human who drinks vampire blood will temporarily gain a slightly weaker version of the Healing Factor that vampires have, allowing said human to recover from otherwise fatal injuries. Similarly, the blood of the Original hybrid, Klaus, can be used to heal a normal vampire from a werewolf bite, which is typically fatal to non-Original vampires.
  • February 12, 2014
    DAN004
    Compare Eye Of Newt
  • February 13, 2014
    Arivne
    Tabletop Games
    • Dungeons And Dragons
      • 1st Edition. When eaten, the royal jelly secreted by Giant Honeybees acted as a potion of Extra Healing and a Cure Disease spell.
  • February 13, 2014
    Chernoskill
    Not sure if this fits.

    Mythology

    • In the Nibelung saga, Siegfried slays a dragon and bathes in it's blood, thereby gaining invincibility (except for one spot on his back which was covered by a leaf).
  • February 13, 2014
    paycheckgurl
    Subverted in Spider Man with a nasty case of Reality Ensues. Peter's blood is said to have healing properties and a transfusion would help a patient. Both are technically true, but when Aunt May needed a transfusion from him she got radiation poisoning before she got better. We Love Nuclear Power and all, but as in real life injecting someone with radiation isn't necessarily the best for their health.
  • February 13, 2014
    Chabal2
  • February 13, 2014
    Diask
    • Queen bees in Spelunky HD, when killed, drop gel that restores one Hit Point to a spelunker who picks it up.
  • February 13, 2014
    DAN004
  • February 13, 2014
    troacctid
    This might be a good candidate for a pun title or a Trope Namer.

    • In Heroes, Claire's blood turns out to be a miracle cure.
  • February 13, 2014
    Hero_Gal_2347
    Wouldn't the Superman comics example go under Swiss Army Tears?
  • February 13, 2014
    Paradisesnake
    ^^ You should Pot Hole that to Healing Factor. Otherwise the example isn't going to make much sense.
  • February 14, 2014
    lamoxlamae
    This page looks about ready to launch!
  • February 14, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ One more hat, dude
  • February 14, 2014
    Hero_Gal_2347
    Wasn't there a Superman comic where Lois and Lana both got sick and the cure was in Superman's blood?
  • February 14, 2014
    randomsurfer
    • In an issue of The Incredible Hulk from the early 1990s Jim Wilson, a former Teen Sidekick of the Hulk, asks him for a transfusion because he's dying of AIDS and thinks that the Hulk's blood will cure him, much like it made Bruce Banner's cousing Jennifer into the She Hulk. He refuses.
    • In a Treehouse Of Horror episode of The Simpsons Bart is immune to a zombie plague. The other still-human residents of Springfield want to kill, cut up & eat him in order to aquire his immunity.
  • February 14, 2014
    zero24
    EDIT: Covered by an earlier reply.
  • February 15, 2014
    DAN004
    Maybe title can be a bit mpre concise?
  • February 15, 2014
    StarSword
    Is somebody actually updating this?
  • February 15, 2014
    DAN004
    Is this Up For Grabs yet?
  • February 15, 2014
    StarSword
    ^Yeah, X Fllo bumped it from Development Hell but forgot to actually add the Up For Grabs tag.
  • February 16, 2014
    TrueShadow1
  • March 20, 2014
    XFllo
    bump
  • March 20, 2014
    SharleeD
    Mainlining The Monster already covers many of these examples, as does Solid Gold Poop.
  • March 21, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ this would be a subtrope then.
  • May 18, 2014
    jormis29
    • Agents Of SHIELD "T.A.H.I.T.I." reveals that agent Coulson was resurrected by a drug called GH.325, derived from the bodily fluids of a blue humanoid corpse of unknown origin, code named G.H. It is then used to heal Skye's fatal bullet wounds.
  • July 31, 2014
    XFllo
    Bumping once again. I'll probably volunteer to sponsor it...
  • July 31, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ Go ahead.
  • July 31, 2014
    DAN004
    Regarding the No Real Life Examples Please, I'd like to argue that if the Real Life bodily fluids (or some other bodily products; thinking of snake fangs or toad glands) is used in a fantastic way (i.e used for fantastic magic/potion/etc and not in the way it is used in Real Life) then it should count.
  • July 31, 2014
    Synchronicity
    • Bodily fluids are often used in potions in Harry Potter. Some entries are elaborated on from the companion novel Fantastic Beasts And Where To Find Them:
      • Phoenix tears have universally healing properties.
      • Unicorn blood can give the drinker life or preserve it, but killing a unicorn will curse them.
      • Re'em blood gives the drinker Super Strength for a short amount of time.
      • Salamander blood is mentioned to have rejuvenating properties, and is thus often used in strengthening potions.

    EDIT: Oops, the phoenix tears and unicorn blood were already mentioned above. Sorry about that.

    ^I agree. Like in this example, we muggles probably don't have any use for salamander blood, but them wizards use it as a healing ingredient — so I'd say it qualifies.
  • August 1, 2014
    DAN004
    Sorry, but gonna pull a hat. Many things need to be sorted out.
  • August 1, 2014
    jormis29
    • The Music Video for the Silverchair song, "Freak" has an old woman paying to consume sweat produced by the band while they are playing. Not satisfied with just the sweat causing her to be de-aged, she demands more. This causes her to mutate alien features such as yellow-green eyes, purple lips and bony ridges. She does seem quite happy with the changes.

Three days must pass before this YKTTW is Launchworthy or Discardable

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=zid5ltk2kxh96owm67act4oe