Created By: HawktureShorts155 on August 25, 2012

Wedgie

A character gets a wedgie.

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
Part Slapstick, part Wardrobe Malfunction, this occurs when a character has the clothing on or around their buttocks suddenly grabbed and lifted. It comes in two humiliating flavors.

The classic wedgie is (with a few noteworthy exceptions) always visited upon a male character. The character will have his underpants violently pulled up, literally "wedging" them into his anus. The underpants might be left hanging from some high place (with the victim still in them) as added humiliation, or they might be pulled so high they cover the victim's eyes and/or face (the "atomic" wedgie). The recipient in most settings tends to be a Nerd, especially if the show is taking place on a high-school campus.

The less vulgar variant can be visited upon either men or women, and it typically involves a clawed apparatus of some sort (a hook, in most cases) snagging a character by the seat of the pants or the hem of a skirt and lifting them into the air. If this happens to a woman in a skirt, her panties will be flashed to the world. This is popular in "zany" cartoons.
Community Feedback Replies: 22
  • August 26, 2012
    Mozgwsloiku
    • In one The Simpsons Halloween comic special, the use of Death Note results in two school bullies dying from a wedgie Mutual Kill.
  • August 26, 2012
    Routerie
    I don't know if this is a trope. This kind of falls under the category of "things that just happen, in real life, and also in fiction." The trope would be what the story does with the wedgie.

    Bully-gives-wedgie-to-nerd-and-everyone-laughs would be a trope, and it would be the same trope as bully-humiliates-nerd-in-any-of-several-ways-and-everyone-laughs.
  • August 26, 2012
    KZN02
    See also Swirlie for other bully antics.
  • August 26, 2012
    randomsurfer
    • In Bill And Teds Bogus Journey B&T give Death a wedgie (or as they apparently call it in Southern CA a "Melvin") to get away from him.
    • The Simpsons
      • Homer gives one to himself as he's "Jiggling for Justice" as part of a protest of a new stadium being built. He drives by some construction workers who have just gotten done ogling a woman passing by, dressed only in very tight cutoff jean shorts. The vibrations of the riding mower he's driving give him the wedgie, which Squicks the workers out even more.
      • Martin is sometimes seen having become the victim of a wedgie. In the episode parodying 24 he wedgies himself, hanging himself on a coat peg in a (virtual) "What Have I Done" suicide.
  • August 27, 2012
    KarjamP
  • August 27, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    ^ Does fiction have wedgies just happen, and it has no significance? That's what PSOC actually requires.
  • August 27, 2012
    Xtifr
    Yes, this is a trope. It's a common way to indicate that bullying is occurring. Bullying may be a supertrope, but that doesn't mean this isn't a trope.
  • August 27, 2012
    Routerie
    Okay, but then the trope would be x-bullies-y-by-giving-y-a-wedgie, a subtrope of bullying. Giving death a wedgie to escape him would not be an example. Nor would Homer getting a wedgie to construction workers' disgust, or Martin giving himself one. Those would be, in order, Did You Just Flip Off Cthulhu, a spoof of Construction Catcalls using Fan Disservice, and a spoof of Driven To Suicide.
  • August 27, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    Well since we have Swirlie, it does give some merit to this as a trope. That is unless one can prove we should merge these into a stock bullying tactics page.
  • August 28, 2012
    Obasheeba
    I think "wedgie" on its own is too insignificant to be a trope. If it were referring to some sort of extremely-severe wedgie, and was given the name "Atomic Wedgie" or something, it would look better as a trope.
  • August 28, 2012
    Xtifr
    I think wedgies are too significant and meaningful to not be a trope. At the very least, it's a subtrope of Amusing Injury, and, unlike a lot of Amusing Injuries, signifies a strong humiliation for the recipient. A person who gets a wedgie is almost always a sad sack. Yes, even Death, in the example above, becomes a sad sack by the mere virtue of having received a wedgie.
  • August 28, 2012
    Routerie
    Okay again, then make the trope Wedgied Sad Sack. Not just wedgie. If it;s just "wedgie," it will attract examples like "Homer got a wedgie this one time while walking, and it was disgusting."
  • August 29, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
  • August 30, 2012
    Xtifr
    Yeah, I'm good with something like that. (Though I'd be more concerned if I'd ever seen a case where a wedgie "just happens".)
  • August 30, 2012
    elwoz
    ^ Bloom County did it at least once (Opus wore pants that were the wrong size).
  • August 30, 2012
    rodneyAnonymous
    Arguably, anything that is mentioned / happens at all is significant in some way. "Significance?" is kind of a semantic twist away from the important question, which is "meaning?"

    Just "wedgie" is "chair". "Bullies Give Wedgies" or "Only Losers Get Wedgies" or whatever are tropes because it's about that being used to convey a particular message. Just "wedgie" might be used to convey many different messages, and is not by itself a trope, like a particular hair or eye color by itself is not a trope.
  • August 30, 2012
    Xtifr
    ^^ Opus was the series' resident sad sack. (We're talking about authorial reasons, not causal.)

    ^ Find me one example where the author uses a wedgie for some reason other than to humiliate a character, and I'll concede the point. Until then, I respectfully disagree, but have no problem with a clearer name. Humiliating Wedgie might be good. I think it's redundant, but it is clear.
  • August 30, 2012
    rodneyAnonymous
    Although commonly used that way, as Routerie pointed out above, wedgies can be used for lots of things besides straight-up humiliation, like when Bill and Ted escape Death by giving him a reverse wedgie, in Bill And Teds Bogus Journey (Did You Just Flip Off Cthulhu). "Why" should be specified; "any wedgie for any reason" is not a trope.
  • August 30, 2012
    elwoz
    ^ True. However, the strip I'm thinking of was more about Opus as walking deconstruction of Funny Animal. He was going on a safari (in search of the elusive basselope, if memory serves), and penguin-sized safari shorts were not available, so he grit his beak and wore human-sized shorts, despite that this meant suffering a wedgie for the duration of the safari.

    Admittedly, in large part Opus was the resident sad sack because he was a penguin trying to live as a human, but I don't think this particular strip was using the wedgie to underline the sadsackness.

    Despite all that, I agree "Only Losers Get Wedgies" is a better name for this trope than just "Wedgie." Breathed likes to play with his tropes.

  • August 30, 2012
    Xtifr
    So, Bill and Ted humiliated Death in order to escape, and Opus humiliated himself, as he so often did. Yes, I'm quite familiar with both works (especially Bloom County/Outland), and as I said before, I've never seen a wedgie that wasn't given (by the author) in order to (at least in part) humiliate the character. It may not be the primary or only purpose, but in my experience, it's always a purpose.

    I don't think Only Losers Get Wedgies quite works, though. Non-losers can get wedgies, but only (as with the example of Death) when they're being humiliated. Which is why I recommend Humiliating Wedgie. But I could go with the former name under the Tropes Are Flexible principle.
  • July 21, 2013
    Kafkaking
    What about something like action wedgie or fight wedgie or painful wedgie, were it at least implies that the wedgie is a site gag and not something like tight pants?
  • July 21, 2013
    DAN004
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=yrxnh27b67o4t789mx3bcmr2