Human Hammer Throw
Grabbing some part of your opponents body, spinning around one or more turns, and then letting go!
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(permanent link) added: 2011-11-06 05:39:51 sponsor: DAN004 (last reply: 2013-11-19 01:10:44)

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Indexes: Fight Scene, Combat Tropes, Everything's Better with Spinning

Grabbing some part of your opponents body, spinning around one or more turns, and then letting go!

This is a popular move due to its sheer impressiveness, though it's more than a little impractical. Usually, it's the legs or feet that are grabbed, but in some cases it's the arms, the heads, or the tail (if present).

May be combined with Grievous Harm with a Body (either hitting other people on the turns or with the throw) or A Twinkle in the Sky. Compare also Metronomic Man Mashing and Spinning Piledriver. It can be done with an ally, as a physically slightly more believable way to do a Fastball Special when the hurlee is heavy.

A subtrope of Wrestler in All of Us, though it's seldom seen in wrestling (which should tell something of how practical the move really is). There it often is called a "Giant Swing". The name "Hammer Throw" refers to the one of Olympic Games' events; this trope is when someone replaces the "hammer" as the thing being thrown.

The hurler pretty much has to have Super Strength, Charles Atlas Superpower, or at least be very, very angry.


Examples

Anime
  • In Attack on Titan, The Rogue Titan accomplishes this by grabbing an opponent's neck with its teeth.
  • In Dragon Ball, Goku does this to Freeza by grabbing his tail, and in the fighting videogames it's his standard "grab" attack, though he goes after the opponent's leg there instead.

Film
  • Superman II. During the battle with the three Kryptonian supervillains, Superman grabs General Zod by an arm and a leg and swings him around in a circle. When he releases him, Zod flies away at great speed and hits an advertising sign. Watch it here.
    • As a nod to this, in Man of Steel, in the final fight, Zod grabs Supes by the cape, then spins him around a few times before throwing him across multiple buildings.
  • In Airplane! it's used as a dance move.
  • In Kung Fu Hustle, the Landlord uses a variant of this where he grabbed the twin blind musicians, one on each hand, then grind them along the ground while spinning and then throw them away. It's revealed that he draws a taijitu on the ground in the process.
  • Up to Eleven in Pacific Rim, as the tosser in this case is a Kaiju and the tossee a Humongous Mecha. Gipsy Danger ends up flying for the better part of a mile before crashing into a harbor, thanks to the massively strong Leatherback.

Literature

Professional Wrestling
  • WWE wrestler Antonio Cesaro grabs both of his opponent's legs and swings them around for a numerous rotations. It pretty much is his Signature Move.

Video Game
  • In Tekken, there is a special throw known as the "Giant Swing/Spinning Throw", which operates under the basic principles of this trope. It is usable by King, Armor King, Roger/Alex, and Roger Jr., either as a standalone throw or as the end of a particular throw chain. King II also possesses a faster variant of the throw ("Swing Away") which can be performed when the opponent is on the ground.
  • Colossus in Capcom's crossover titles has this kind of move, named "Giant Swing".
  • Marvel vs. Capcom 3
  • Sasquatch in Darkstalkers series grabs enemy's body before doing the same.
  • In Super Mario 64, Mario defeats Bowser by grabbing him by the tail, spinning him around, and then tossing him into one of several explosives that surround the battle arena.
  • In Wario World, one of Wario's attacks involves picking up the enemies and then spinning them around in circles. He can do this to almost every enemy in the game, including the massive dinosaur that acts at the first world's boss.
  • In every version of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles arcade game, the Turtles have the ability to spin mooks around and hurl them into the player's screen.
  • Wolf Hawkfield of Virtua Fighter uses it.
  • In Dead Rising Frank West uses this against zombies. He also uses it in one of his hyper combos in Tatsunoko vs. Capcom and Ultimate Marvel Vs Capcom 3.
  • In Suikoden V, Faylon does this to his sister, Faylen, seen at 2:05 here, during their unite attack; which has him approach her from behind and grab her legs. Then spins her around a few times before launching her at the enemy!
    • This usually causes them to become unbalanced afterward, but you can get around it if you equip each of them with an equilibrium rune. That way, you can spam their unite attack without having to wait for them to recover.
  • Dead or Alive, Tina Armstrong's "Texas Twister" has her grab downed opponents by their legs, then spin and toss them. Bass's lower leg counter, "Giant Swing", is even more impressive in terms of it's speed, power, and most especially of all... distance!
  • Bloody Roar: Primal Fury Ganesha also has one of these. After grabbing the victim's legs, he slams them once, then whips 'em around and tosses them across the ring. Shina has one too, except hers is used on crouching opponents, and has her hook them by their arms, spin, and launch them vertically into the air. The victim lands headfirst.
  • Soul Calibur II, Astaroth's "Poseiden Tide" is one of the most visually impressive throws of this nature. He uses his battle axe to whip the opponent around at high speed before launching them high into the air and quite nearly the opposite side of the arena!
  • Mario's throw in Super Smash Bros. looks just like the aforementioned Bowser throw from Super Mario 64.
  • This is an advanced HEAT Action in the Yakuza series. With the HEAT Gauge full, Kazuma Kiryu can throw a grappled enemy for very high damage, as well as clearing out enemies surrounding him.
  • In Batman: Arkham City, Robin has a special combo move where he grabs a foe and swings them around a couple times before throwing them.
  • A couple of Mario's throws in the Super Smash Brothers series are these in homage to Super Mario 64.

Web Animation

Western Animation
  • The Simpsons: When the clan go to a 50s themed diner, first Homer spins Marge around by the hair, then Marge spins Homer by one leg.
  • In The Little Rascals short "Rushin' Ballet" Butch & Worm do this to Alfalfa while they're onstage at a ballet recital, Alfalfa having been Disguised in Drag in order to escape their clutches (it didn't work).
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