Created By: CluLegacyAugust 11, 2013 Last Edited By: CluLegacyAugust 19, 2013
Nuked

Character Leaves With The Actor

An actor leaves a show and their character is written out in consequence. [Trivia]

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
Noticed someone missing at the right? The black guy was axed because his actor left. The white guy only replaced him in the cover, though.

Up For Grabs

When an actor decides to leave a show, or is fired, or is unavailable for a long time, or dies, the obvious thing to do is writing out the character.

This sometimes can lead to the creation of a Suspiciously Similar Substitute. Also can be the reason behind Put On A Bus, when the character takes a "vacation". May be caused by Role Ending Misdemeanor.

This effect is common enough, we have subtropes dealing with specific variations:

Examples belong on the appropriate subtrope.

The aversion (when the character is not written out) is The Other Darrin and The Nth Doctor. Compare Character Outlives Actor when an actor dies and the character remains alive off-screen or on-screen.

This entry is Trivia and is related to/shall be indexed under Characters And Casting and Real Life Writes The Plot.

Examples:

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:Film]]
  • Dana Freeling (Carol Anne's elder sister) from Poltergeist was written out of Poltergeist II due to the actress Dominique Dunne having been murdered. Word Of God stated that Dana was in the college during the events of II however she was not even mentioned in the film.
  • The Joker was intended to reappear in The Dark Knight Rises but then the actor Heath Ledger passed away and the script had to be rewritten without the Joker because Ledger's image was strongly attached to the character.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Live Action TV]]
  • After Francesca Gonshaw's departure from the show at the end of the third series, Allo Allo! opted to explain why Maria Recamier had suddenly vanished when she was trapped in the prison camp for British soldiers with the majority of rest of the primary cast by explaining that she had attempted to escape by disguising herself as a package and getting mailed out. Unfortunately, she didn't have enough stamps and was as such "returned to Switzerland."
  • This is played straight in the Brazilian television: Actors are never replaced in soap operas, drama series or comedy shows. If an actor dies the character is written out. Period.
  • Babylon Five made frequent use of Put On A Bus and The Bus Came Back. Notably, Commander Sinclair (Michael O'Hare) was replaced by the seemingly very similar Captain Sheridan (Bruce Boxleitner), but Sinclair continued to receive character development as O'Hare became a recurring guest star.
    • Commander Susan Ivanova was given her own ship to command when the actress Claudia Christian left the show. She appeared a year later in the last episode of season five, which was however filmed as the last episode of the season four when the actress was still part of the cast.
  • Beverly Hills 90210: When Shannon Doherty was fired due to unprofessional behavior her character Brenda Walsh went off to London and never more came back. Reverted when Doherty made cameo appearances in the Sequel Series 90210.
  • After five seasons on Bewitched, Aunt Clara was quietly dropped from the show, due to Marion Lorne's death. In spite of The Other Darrins this show had (different actors played Darrin, Gladys Kravitz, and Louise Tate), Aunt Clara was the only character who wasn't recast, so in her place, the writers brought in a Suspiciously Similar Substitute named Esmeralda, played by Alice Ghostley.
  • First-Season character of the series Big Wolf On Campus Stacy Hansen is a prime example. It's revealed at the start of the Second Season that she had left for college. This is somewhat based on real life in that the actress who played Stacy really DID go to college.
  • On Bonanza, Adam Cartwright moved to Australia when Pernell Roberts left the show.
  • CSINY:
    • Detective Aiden Burn was dismissed from the team in season two episode "Grand Murder at Central Station" due to actress Vanessa Ferlito having left to pursue career in theatre and films. Subverted with Ferlito's special appearance in season two episode "Heroes", where Aiden is Killed Off For Real.
    • Detective Stella Bonasera moved definitively from New York to New Orleans due to actress Melina Kanakaredes not renewing her contract to season seven.
  • Degrassi:
    • Darcy supposedly goes to Africa as some sort of missionary, when in reality the actress Shenae Grimes left to work on 90210.
    • Mia Jones went off to Paris to model. In reality actress Nina Dobrev ran off to The Vampire Diaries.
  • Doctor Who: Louise Jameson wanted to leave, and at the time had no real interest in returning sometime down the line, and so asked that her character Leela die at the end of her last serial. The producers decided the event might be too traumatic for children (more likely, they were concerned about the increasing violence in the show -- the series was already being targeted by Media Watchdogs), and so instead had a last-minute romance occur between her and a capitol guard, prompting her to stay on Gallifrey.
  • Doogie Howser MD: Dr. Jack McGuire, the hunky (yet not too suave) doc played by Mitchell Anderson. Although an integral part of the show, Anderson quit the series at the end of season 2, and was subsequently written off. McGuire, after returning from a life-changing mission trip to Mexico, decided to move across the border to continue pursuing his medical aspirations.
  • iCarly: Chuck Cunningham, Spenser's nemesis, was sent off to military school since the actor Ryan Ochoa is now appearing on Pair Of Kings on Disney.
  • From M*A*S*H:
    • The actor Wayne Rogers (who played Trapper John McIntyre) had some disagreements with the producers and so left between seasons 3 & 4. In the opening episode of season 4 Hawkeye returns from R&R and discovers that Trapper John had been discharged while he was away. Hawkeye tries to catch Trapper before he leaves Seul, but he misses him and picks up his replacement, BJ Hunnicut. The change was so sudden (behind the scenes) that they had to start filming the shows they had already written before they could write the one intoducing BJ; they just changed all the instances of "Trapper" to "BJ" in the script.
    • The actor Gary Burghoff (who played Radar O'Reilly) decided to leave after the seventh season due to having lost the interest in his role and because he wanted to spend more time with his family. His last appearance in the show was in the two-part special episode of the eighth season "Good Bye, Radar".
  • When James Bolam left New Tricks his character, Jack Halford, was also written out in-universe, the character said he was leaving to retire to France. Also in New Tricks Alun Armstrong's character, Brian, suffered from a No Good Deed Goes Unpunished moment and made to leave UCOS when Armstrong decided to move on.
  • In NYPD Blue's first season David Caruso became a major hearthrob and decided to quit the show to pursue a film career, which upset the creators of the show. But they decided that no matter how much the actor pissed them off, the character of John Kelly didn't deserve being Put On A Bus To Hell; so Kelly proudly left out on his own terms.
  • Darth Lott was written out of Raumschiff Gamestar in a hurry because his actor, Gunnar Lott, was promoted to editor-in-chief of GameStar's sister magazine GamePro and had to leave the team.
  • In That70s Show, main characters Eric Forman and Michael Kelso are both written out due to their respective actors Topher Grace and Ashton Kutcher working on other projects. Eric leaves in the seventh season finale to teach in Africa; Kelso remains among the cast for the first few episodes of Season 8 before leaving for Chicago. Both make guest appearances in the series finale.
  • When T'Keyah Crystal Keymh decided to leave Thats So Raven the character Tanya Baxter was written out by stating she went to study in England. Tanya didn't even appear in the spin-off Cory In The House.
  • In 1992 Bea Arthur decided to leave The Golden Girls to go on with her acting career and the producers didn't dare to replace her, what led to the end of the show and the production of a short-lived spin-off without her character Dorothy Zbornak: The Golden Palace.
  • When David Duchovny decided to leave The X Files due to a contract dispute the executive producer Chris Carter considered recasting the character Fox Mulder but then he decided that Mulder would be abducted by aliens, making him a recurring character in the show.
  • Threes Company: Suzanne Somers's character, Chrissy Snow was sent away when her contract wasn't renewed because of her protesting for a pay raise. Her character was sent off to tend to her sick aunt. She spent the rest of her run on the show in brief on-the-phone segments until her contract ran out.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Western Animation]]
  • In Blues Clues, to help its impressionable young viewers cope more easily with the resignation of host Steve Burns, he supposedly leaves to go to college and is quickly replaced by a brother, Joe.
  • When Phil Hartman was murdered his characters in The Simpsons were retired.
[[/folder]]
Community Feedback Replies: 87
  • August 11, 2013
    paycheckgurl
    A large part of this is already covered under The Character Died With Him and Real Life Writes The Plot....
  • August 11, 2013
    CluLegacy
    Indeed this IS a subtrope to Real Life Writes The Plot AND a supertrope to The Character Died With Him.
  • August 11, 2013
    MorganWick
    Needs a better title and a much better laconic.
  • August 12, 2013
    Arivne
    Also a Super Trope to McLeaned, where an actor decides to leave a show and their character is killed off.

    If an example is already on The Character Died With Him, McLeaned or any other Sub Trope it doesn't need to be added here too.
  • August 12, 2013
    Koveras
  • August 12, 2013
    lakingsif
    • In the first season of That '70s Show Donna has a sister for an episode who we later hear nothing about. In the soap-style episode this is lampshaded by asking if we'll ever hear from Midge's second daughter. Sh's never mentioned for another few seasons (while the parents divorce, Donna gets engaged) until Donna says she's an only child. The character sort-of served a purpose in an episode then was dropped.
  • August 12, 2013
    AgentLetrush
    Is there anything about this that isn't covered by Mc Leaned or The Character Died With Him? All the examples that aren't already on those pages probably should be (except for the one about Brazilian television, as it does cover both). I'm a newbie, and don't know the rules for supertropes, but does this need examples?
  • August 12, 2013
    OlafMerchant
    Live Action TV

    • The character Zhaan from Farscape died because her actress developed health problems due to the makeup they used, as well as several other outstanding issues.
  • August 12, 2013
    Paradisesnake
    The laconic of Mc Leaned: A character is killed because their actor left the program.

    I don't really see the difference between these two...
  • August 12, 2013
    CluLegacy
    I'm open to suggestions of laconic. Thanks everyone for the feedback.
  • August 12, 2013
    CluLegacy
    ^^ This trope covers not only characters killed off, but characters written out at all. That's why it's a supertrope to Mc Leaned.
  • August 12, 2013
    CluLegacy
    @lakingsif: Was the sister played by an actress? If so, did the actress become unavailable for any reason? If not, this isn't an example.
  • August 12, 2013
    lakingsif
    ^ That '70s Wiki says that Donna actually had two sisters when the show began, an older one who is never seen and the younger one who is. They both existed and then didn't: Word Of God says that Tina was meant to appear in more episodes after season 1, but the actress wasn't available, and then being a single child suited the plot and character development of Donna, so she was expendable. The older sister was meant to show what a good future Donna could have but was never really included and so axed, too.
  • August 12, 2013
    justanotherrandomlurker
    Live Action TV
    • After five seasons on Bewitched, Aunt Clara was quietly dropped from the show, due to Marion Lorne's death. In spite of The Other Darrins this show had (different actors played Darrin, Gladys Kravitz, and Louise Tate), Aunt Clara was the only character who wasn't recast, so in her place, the writers brought in a Suspiciously Similar Substitute named Esmeralda, played by Alice Ghostley.
    • Radar O'Reilly from M*A*S*H. Although the series had replaced characters altogether before, Radar in particular was so beloved and irreplacable. G.W. Bailey as Sergeant Luther Rizzo was originally meant to be Radar's replacement, but knowing it wouldn't have worked like previous character replacements had, Klinger was instead "promoted" to Radar's position to avoid upset.
  • August 12, 2013
    RandomSurfer
    ^Also from MASH, actor Wayne Rogers had some disagreements with the producers and so left between seasons 3 & 4. In the opening episode of season 4 Hawkeye returns from R&R and discovers that Trapper John had been discharged while he was away. Hawkeye tries to catch Trapper before he leaves Seul, but he misses him and picks up his replacement, BJ Hunnicut.

    The change was so sudden (behind the scenes) that they had to start filming the shows they had already written before the could write the one intoducing BJ; they just changed all the instances of "Trapper" to "BJ" in the script.
  • August 12, 2013
    DAN004
    Tangentially related to Pigeonholed Voice Actor?
  • August 12, 2013
    CluLegacy
    @lakingsif: Was Tina Pinciotti supposed to be a recurring character in That70s Show? Or was she supposed to be a one-time appearance? If it's the former, then why did the actress Amanda Fuller leave the show after only one episode?
  • August 12, 2013
    FrodoGoofballCoTV
    Live Action Television:
    • In Downton Abbey, actor Dan Stevens wanted to leave the show, so they Dropped A Bridge On Him, much to the fans' horror, as Matthew was The Hero, and his death may have doomed the Crawley Family to a bad end.
    • Babylon Five made frequent use of Put On A Bus and The Bus Came Back. Notably, Commander Sinclair (Michael O'Hare) was replaced by the seemingly very similar Captain Sheridan (Bruce Boxleitner), but Sinclair continued to receive character development as O'Hare became a recurring guest star.
  • August 12, 2013
    KJMackley
    The problem I see is this is an aversion trope, not an averted trope but a trope that depends on averting something. It relies on NOT doing what you expected instead of an actual action, which ultimately means we are cataloging nothing that happens. The important idea is basically covered by Put On A Bus so I don't see much use for this trope.
  • August 12, 2013
    CluLegacy
    ^ The idea of Put On A Bus has nothing to do with an actor leaving a show. Also, this is Super Trope so it's not expected "much use".

    EDIT: But you lighted a good point. Put On A Bus To Hell seems to be a Sub Trope to this.
  • August 12, 2013
    paycheckgurl
    I'm not sure about the picture. It seems like Just A Face And A Caption.
  • August 12, 2013
    CluLegacy
    ^ I agree. Picture removed.
  • August 12, 2013
    gallium
  • August 12, 2013
    Tallens
    ^How?

    Might also want to compare The Nth Doctor.

  • August 13, 2013
    gallium
    Because this isn't a trope, it's just something that happens. When an actor leaves a program, the character is written out. Chairs is defined thusly: "People Sit On Chairs don't convey any meaning — they aren't storytelling conventions at all, they're just things that happen normally or incidentally during the storytelling." Certainly writing out a character is far more common than recasting with The Other Darrin.
  • August 13, 2013
    maxwellsilver
    Covered by several different tropes while not being a trope itself.

    Motion to discard.
  • August 13, 2013
    CluLegacy
    ^^ No Trope Is Too Common. ^ Also you really don't understand the meaning of Super Trope.
  • August 13, 2013
    CluLegacy
    From The Other Darrin:

    This entry is trivia, which is cool and all, but not a trope. On a work, it goes on the Trivia tab.

    Like The Other Darrin, this one is also trivia, so a motion to discard for "not being a trope itself" is pretty mean-spirited.
  • August 13, 2013
    Larkmarn
    I think the best thing to do would make a Super Trope to pretty much all the tropes at play here as Written Out.

    I think this is just the default fate of an actor leaving, while The Other Darrin and The Nth Doctor are aversions; Put On A Bus, Mc Leaned and The Character Died With Him are subtropes.

    That make sense to anyone else?
  • August 13, 2013
    CluLegacy
    ^Yes it does. I'm open to suggestions of name.
  • August 13, 2013
    Larkmarn
    I'm thinking just Written Out. In my mind, making it as vanilla as possible highlights that it's the default that we hardly think of since the others are a lot more colorful.
  • August 13, 2013
    SeptimusHeap
    This is Trivia, not People Sit On Chairs - it's about how the leave of an actor changes a work.

    That said, the name violates two guidelines at once [1],[2] so it definitively needs to go.
  • August 13, 2013
    CluLegacy
    OK, name changed.
  • August 13, 2013
    SeptimusHeap
    I've alphabetized, folderized and namespaced the draft.
  • August 13, 2013
    Tallens
    EDIT: Whoops, I was thinking of something completely else.
  • August 13, 2013
    KJMackley
    A character written out of a show is Put On A Bus, a character written out of a show by being killed is McLeaned, a character written out of a show in a mean spirited manner is Put On A Bus To Hell. The reasons for any of them and the aftermath are irrelevant, they tend to be separate tropes like Role Ending Misdemeanor or Suspiciously Similar Substitute. Put On A Bus is basically the supertrope already, which could probably get Written Out made as a redirect because that is the industry term for it.
  • August 13, 2013
    Koveras
    • Darth Lott was written out of Raumschiff Gamestar in a hurry because his actor, Gunnar Lott, was promoted to editor-in-chief of GameStar's sister magazine GamePro and had to leave the team.
  • August 14, 2013
    CluLegacy
    ^Put On A Bus isn't supertrope neither to Mc Leaned (because it DOES depend on the actor leaving) nor to The Character Died With Him (because it also does depend on the actor leaving) and not even to Put On A Bus To Hell (at most it's a Sister Trope to Put On A Bus). But it can be caused by the actor leaving, so it can be considered a subtrope.
  • August 14, 2013
    CluLegacy
    Also, "irrelevant" isn't a valid reason to discard because There Is No Such Thing As Notability.
  • August 14, 2013
    CluLegacy
    And a character written out of a show by being killed is Killed Off For Real.
  • August 14, 2013
    SeptimusHeap
    ^Character Death if anything, actually.
  • August 14, 2013
    CluLegacy
    Mc Leaned is when a character is killed off because the actor left.
  • August 14, 2013
    DAN004
  • August 14, 2013
    SeptimusHeap
    No, The Character Died With Him is when the actor dies. Mc Leaned is when the actor leaves.
  • August 14, 2013
    KJMackley
    Actually read the description of Put On A Bus and not just the name. It is simply "Character written out of a series." The caveat that they have the possibility of returning is really secondary to that, most of the time they never return. Killed Off For Real has nothing to do with being written out of a show, it's a counterpoint to Death Is Cheap. And No Such Thing As Notability is about WORKS, not tropes (ie a webcomic that ran for 2 weeks can get a media page). Tropes actually do have to be notable otherwise it is People Sit On Chairs.
  • August 15, 2013
    Arivne
    ^ Put On A Bus specifically says that the character leaves the show in such a way that they can be easily brought back. Your statement that the possibility of their return is not actually necessary is incorrect.

    If they can't return easily then it is not Put On A Bus by definition.

    Put On A Bus is not a Super Trope to this trope because this trope is not limited to examples where the character can be easily brought back.
  • August 15, 2013
    crazysamaritan
    Put On A Bus must allow the character to return.

    Examples of sub tropes, such as Mc Leaned and Put On A Bus To Hell should not be present on this page.
  • August 15, 2013
    CluLegacy
    ^^^ People Sit On Chairs has nothing to do with notability, but with something being too common to trope. Nice try. And Killed Off For Real has nothing to do with being written out of a show? Insane Troll Logic.
  • August 15, 2013
    CluLegacy
    EDIT: I removed the Charlie Sheen and the Downton Abbey examples for being a case of Mc Leaned.
  • August 15, 2013
    SeptimusHeap
    People Sit On Chairs is about something not being meaningful enough to trope. It's not "too common to trope".
  • August 15, 2013
    CluLegacy
    The Farscape example was properly moved to Mc Leaned.
  • August 15, 2013
    crazysamaritan
  • August 15, 2013
    KJMackley
    Clu, the proposal is effectively covered by all the different tropes we have listed. A rule of thumb is that if you fight so much to defend your ykttw then it likely does not fit a needed "gap" in trope coverage. This ykttw as written means nothing.

    Now I also understand the semantics with regards to Put On A Bus, but any sort of supertrope is covered simply by Written Out, not anything with regards to what is proposed here.

    And by the way, Killed Off For Real doesn't always result in being written out. Just see Dragonball Z.
  • August 15, 2013
    SeptimusHeap
    I actually don't see anyone arguing for this thing to be already covered. Am I missing something?
  • August 15, 2013
    CluLegacy
    ^^ Mc Leaned is when the character is killed off because the actor left.

    The Character Died With Him is when the character is killed off because the actor died and consequently left.

    Put On A Bus To Hell is when a character is written out in a way they will not return, without being killed off, because the actor left.

    You only see the Written Out thing and ignore the true basic idea that is because the actor left. So don't say this ykttw means nothing because no one will buy it.
  • August 15, 2013
    KJMackley
    Look at all the tags at the top, several for "motion to discard," "already have" and "tropeworthy?" I don't use those tags so obviously I'm not the only one who thinks there are problems with the proposal. Cause really, there are only two ways to write someone out and that is either keeping them alive (allowing them to return) or dead (and in some works they can still return).
  • August 15, 2013
    AmyGdala
    I guess this is fine, since No Trope Is Too Common, but we should lose all that stuff about The Other Darrin. There's absolutely no expectation that when an actor leaves, the show will find a new actor to play the character. This trope, in which the character is simply written out, is the norm.
  • August 15, 2013
    CluLegacy
    I thought The Other Darrin were the norm, once it's so much played.

    EDIT: Thanks for the enlightment. Draft fixed.
  • August 15, 2013
    CrypticMirror
    When James Bolam left New Tricks his character, Jack Halford, was also written out in-universe, the character said he was leaving to retire to France. Also in New Tricks Alun Armstrong's character, Brian, suffered from a No Good Deed Goes Unpunished moment and made to leave UCOS when Armstrong decided to move on.
  • August 15, 2013
    gallium
    I agree with KJ Mackley above. This is not a trope.
  • August 15, 2013
    StarSword
    No, this is not a trope. Out-of-universe stuff like this falls under the classification "Trivia item".

    With that clarification, this is a valid super-item.

    Regarding the caption on the page picture: I was under the (perhaps mistaken) impression that Warrick was killed off because the network was mad about his actor's drug use.
  • August 15, 2013
    CluLegacy
    The only way to clarificate that this is a trivia item is adding it to the Trivia index, what i can't do before launching the page.
  • August 16, 2013
    CluLegacy
    EDIT: Indeed, this trivia item can be very useful to stop the misuse of Put On A Bus, i.e. it's not put on a bus when the character knownly will not return, specially in the cases when a) the actor was fired or b) the actor left the show to move on with their career.
  • August 16, 2013
    DAN004
    ^ That'll be Put On A Bus To Hell
  • August 16, 2013
    SeptimusHeap
    There is more to Put On A Bus To Hell than "the actor is gone". That one requires a very mean-spirited removal.
  • August 16, 2013
    StarSword
    @Clu Legacy: Actually, you can clarify that this is Trivia by listing the indexes you want to put this on at the bottom of the draft and/or putting something like "[TRIVIA]" in the Laconic.
  • August 16, 2013
    KJMackley
    There is no guarantee the actor won't be returning regardless of how confrontational the departure was. Killed Off For Real didn't stop Dallas.

    My main problem with the proposal is that it is conflating two very distinct ideas and trying to sell it off as one. There is an actor wanting out of a show. Then there is a character being written out of a show. Both are fine ideas individually but trying to put them together is nonsense. One is a trope, something you can see from watching the show. The other is trivia, something you can only know about if you read interviews. They sometimes go together but not always. Ed O'Neil wanted out of Married With Children for years and only got out when the show ended. Jennifer Morrison never asked to leave House and her being written out was a surprise.

    Lastly the picture does nothing, if you have to explain why the picture is relevant then it fails at what it is supposed to do.
  • August 16, 2013
    crazysamaritan
    It sounds like you want a super trope of Written Out, for characters who leave the story.
  • August 16, 2013
    CluLegacy
    ^^Your main problem is that everything you write is Insane Troll Logic.
  • August 16, 2013
    SeptimusHeap
    While I do not see how this idea is "nonsense", accusing other people of Insane Troll Logic is just a bit rude.

    Please don't do that, Clu.
  • August 16, 2013
    CluLegacy
    I'm sorry for it. Won't repeat. But if this is "nonsense" then everything under Real Life Writes The Plot is "nonsense" because this is Real Life Writes The Plot.

    EDIT: The image in The Other Darrin isn't self-explanatory and it "does", so his argument on the image is fail.
  • August 16, 2013
    CluLegacy
    @crazysamaritan: Indeed it's a "subtrope" of written out, for characters who leave the story because the actor left the show.
  • August 16, 2013
    crazysamaritan
    I understand, and I think this is a valid trivia item. However, KJ Mackley seems to be falling under Missing Supertrope Syndrome. (Also, Killed Off For Real doesn't mean what they think it means) In this case, the symptom is the idea that since we don't have a Written Out trope, we do not need this subtrope.

    I think this could be handled better by Written Out, for all characters, being created as a Trope. ((No Trope Is Too Common although perhaps exampleless)) and this is a Trivia item and subtrope, for when the actor chooses to leave a show.

    Currently, I think your ykttw is too Example As A Thesis to grant a hat, and the image could be improved by doing a red "crayon" circle around Warrick and his placement on the other box. It's unlikely this trope will garner many examples, as it should be redundant to the subtropes of Mc Leaned, Put On A Bus To Hell, and The Character Died With Him.
  • August 16, 2013
    CluLegacy
    ^See if the description is fine now.
  • August 16, 2013
    crazysamaritan
    The image is better because it's drawing attention to the effect. The first paragraph still doesn't work as the first paragraph of the trope, but the earlier version is better than the current as a caption under the image.

    You've done a good job taking out Example as a Thesis, minor suggestion for your subtropes is to replace your paragraph with this:

    This effect is common enough, we have subtropes dealing with specific variations:

    Examples belong on the appropriate subtrope.

    New name is really good; Written Out Because The Actor Left
  • August 16, 2013
    randomsurfer
    In NYPD Blue's first season David Caruso became a major hearthrob and decided to quit the show to pursue a film career, which greatly upset the creators of the show. But they decided that no matter how much the actor pissed them off, the character of John Kelly didn't deserve being Put On A Bus To Hell; so Kelly proudly left out on his own terms.
  • August 16, 2013
    CluLegacy
    Done, i ran out of ideas to the description. Up for grabs.
  • August 16, 2013
    KJMackley
    No, I think all of the value of this trope is that it is a subtrope to Real Life Writes The Plot (actor wants out, writing staff is forced to accommodate). It's past and current incarnation is promoting itself as a supertrope to Put On A Bus, Mc Leaned, etc., which is why I am trying to push for this to be more a general Written Out trope because that IS the supertrope. Simply put, a lot of examples of Put On A Bus happens in media like literature and comic books which don't have actors to deal with.

    On those terms (subtrope to Real Life Writes The Plot) I would suggest a title like Character Leaves With The Actor.
  • August 16, 2013
    crazysamaritan
    Why not have Written Out as a separate trope? Why does the existence of this trope invalidate the existence of Written Out?
  • August 16, 2013
    KJMackley
    Because I believe in practice this trope will just end up as Put On A Bus Because the Actor Wanted to Leave and it will fail to get any traction. In truth this is a subtrope to ANOTHER Missing Supertrope in simply Actor Wants Out (cause The Other Darrin is still an option when an actor leaves). I would like all these ideas be given their own due as their own tropes and not diminished by combining them.
  • August 16, 2013
    crazysamaritan
    How does creating the supertropes diminish the supertropes?

    And this trope cannot be a more specific version of Put On A Bus, because Mc Leaned is a subtrope.
  • August 16, 2013
    FastEddie
    This is not needed, crazysam. No one else is finding it distinct.
  • August 18, 2013
    CluLegacy
    Put On A Bus is a more specific version of Written Out, it's NOT Written Out itself. And how come being a subtrope diminishes a trope? This makes zero sense. And please, a character that goes away with the actor can be put on a bus, but hardly is, as you can see by the examples above.
  • August 18, 2013
    crazysamaritan
    ^^ by "this" do you mean KJ Mackley's idea, or Clu Legacy's idea?

    I see a Lumper Vs Splitter debate going on.
  • August 18, 2013
    CluLegacy
    Put On A Bus implies that the character likely will return, but it's overly misused for characters that clearly will not return.
  • August 18, 2013
    FastEddie
    I backed out that radical revision of the article and massive deletions. This seems to be a discussion in which someone is trying to force into existence a trope which is too finely defined to be useful. Let's drop it. It causing more trouble than it is worth.

    That means do not restore this YKTTW I am about to discard.
  • August 19, 2013
    lu127
    < Moderator Hat on >

    Per the admin's note above, this YKTTW is discarded. Please don't restore it.

Three days must pass before this YKTTW is Launchworthy or Discardable