Created By: OneMore on April 27, 2012 Last Edited By: Muffinbotton on January 13, 2013
Nuked

Luck Manipulation Power

Supernatural ability to change fortune

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
Needs More Examples, probably Needs an Index, maybe Needs a Better Title, Up for Grabs.

Splitting from Winds of Destiny, Change, which is often confused with this.

Belongs to Luck Tropes index, Stock Superpowers. Any more?


A Luck Manipulation Power is an ability to give luck to oneself or others, be it good luck or bad luck.

Simply being Born Lucky or Born Unlucky isn't enough. The character must either make a conscious decision to use his powers over fortune, or be able to convey luckiness to others.

Compare with Winds of Destiny, Change, which is a power based on probability instead of luck. Where with a probability superpower a character can consciously control the probability of specific outcomes, a luck superpower has no such conscious control and is far more random.

In games, both the probability and luck tropes manifest as a Luck Manipulation Mechanic or a Luck Stat. If the flavor of the mechanic is about manipulating luck, it belongs here too.

Compare Luck Manipulation Mechanic, Winds of Destiny, Change, Born Lucky, and Born Unlucky.

Examples:

Comic Books
  • In the Marvel Universe:
    • One of the original Hellions was called Roulette and could generate both good or bad luck.
    • The character Black Cat (Felicia Hardy) originally had (and eventually regained) the power to give "bad luck" to her opponents.
    • The Scarlet Witch's original version of her "Chaos Magic" was essentially weaponized Bad Luck. It caused probability changes to whoever she cast it against - like if she cast it against Cyclops his Eye Beams would ricochet incorrectly compared to how he wanted them to go. (Later versions would have her use a reality warping probability power instead.)
    • Longshot has amazing good luck as long as his motives are pure.
    • Domino has luck that makes things work out so they "fall into place" for her.

Film
  • Intacto, a Spanish film starring Max Von Sydow. The movie's plot involves people who are a sort of "luck vampire" being able to suck a person's luck away to add to their own.
  • By the end of the Just My Luck, the main characters can swap their Born Lucky and Born Unlucky status with each other by kissing.

Literature
  • The Felix Felicis potion in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.
  • In the Harry Potter spinoff Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (a defictionalised version of the book from the stories which was released for Comic Relief), one creature has a bite which curses it's victim with bad luck.
  • Luck Dragons from The Neverending Story don't have conscious control over it, but they are constantly surrounded by a sort of "good luck aura", which makes them and anyone who earns their liking succeed in risky endeavors by pure luck.
  • Morgoth, the God of Evil from The Silmarillion, claimed the title "Master of Fate" and thus cursed Hurin and his descendants. And yes, Hurin's children were plagued by misfortune.
  • While it's not seen in story, the Alloy Of Law Ars Arcanum appendix notes that Feruchemists can use chromium to store "fortune" which makes them unlucky when storing and lucky when they later tap the storage.
  • Teela Brown in Ringworld is not just Born Lucky; her luck practically molds the universe around her. She unconsciously "distributes" good or bad luck to people only so that her own fate is influenced positively.

Live Action TV
  • The luck virus in one episode of Red Dwarf. Lister injected himself with it and found whatever he needed just lying around.
  • In the TV show Misfits, Nathan in the special "Vegas Baby!" is revealed to have gained luck manipulation powers.
Tabletop Games
  • In Pathfinder, Witches have some hexes which do this (mechanically, if gives the victim a penalty on their rolls).
    • The Huldra has the ability to impart good or bad luck to someone.
  • Champions.
    • A character could have the Luck power with the Usable on Others advantage, which would allow the character to make other creatures lucky.
    • Starting with 5th Edition, you can't buy the Unluck disadvantage with the Usable on Others advantage and use it to make other people unlucky. However, you can use a Transform attack to change them into someone who's Born Unlucky.
  • Dungeons & Dragons
    • 1st Edition
      • Fiend Folio. A Tween improves the luck of its host. Each time the host's controller has to roll dice for it, they get to roll twice and take the better result. Those creatures associated with the host don't fare so well: they have to roll twice and take the worse result.
      • Monster Manual II. The Luck Eater drains and feeds on the luck of all creatures within 30 feet of it, worsening their saving throws, chance to hit and the damage they inflict. It stays with the same creatures for 2-5 hours, after which it's sated and leaves.

Video Games

Web Comics
  • Luckmancy, a form of Clevermancy in Erfworld, allows a caster to improve a unit's die rolls at the expense of another. Though it's unclear how this is affected by fate in the prequel novel, and whether characters with a fate can be used to create luck out of nothing.
  • Vriska Serket from Homestuck has an ability to grant and steal luck as part of her Hero of Light powers. It works well with her Fluorite Octet, a set of enchanted dice.
  • The eponymous Lucky Bunny from the Show Within a Show, The Lucky Bunny Bounty Show (an anime parody) from El Goonish Shive. Apparently, she creates greater varieties in luck for those close to her - as she puts it, "Luck doesn't mean GOOD luck" - so her Bounty Hunter partner keeps stumbling into improbably dangerous situations, yet luckily surviving. So essentially she does BOTH - at the same time.

Web Original
  • In Episode 1 of Harry Partridge's animation Starbarians, the main villain is the Evil Snake Wizard Siad, "who can bend the very fates to his own evil will."

Western Animation
  • Teen Titans had Jinx, who could cause bad luck for her foes. Which is egregiously different than the comic book version, who had earth-related Elemental Powers.
  • Tex Avery had a cartoon, "Bad Luck Blackie" about black cats being bad luck -- but only as long as they were black. Paint them white, and the bad luck goes away, thus subverting the black Cat Stereotype.
Community Feedback Replies: 68
  • April 27, 2012
    tdgoodrich1
    For reference here is the relevant TRS thread.
  • April 27, 2012
    Bisected8
    • In Pathfinder, Witches have some hexes which do this (mechanically, if gives the victim a penalty on their rolls).
      • The Huldra has the ability to impart good or bad luck to someone.
    • In the Harry Potter spinoff Fantastic Beasts And Where To Find Them (a defictionalised version of the book from the stories which was released for Comic Relief), one creature has a bite which curses it's victim with bad luck.
  • April 27, 2012
    Antigone3
    Talisman from the Justice Machine has karmic powers -- as long as he does good, good things happen for him.
  • April 27, 2012
    condottiera
    There was a Lindsay Lohan movie called Just My Luck a couple years ago where she loses her luck powers or something. I never saw the movie, though, so I don't know anything else.
  • April 27, 2012
    BrentLaabs
    • Luckmancy, a form of Clevermancy in Erfworld, allows a caster to improve a unit's die rolls at the expense of another. Though it's unclear how this is affected by fate in the prequel novel, and whether characters with a fate can be used to create luck out of nothing.
  • April 27, 2012
    ParadiscaCorbasi
    • Marvel Comics:
      • Longshot has amazing good luck as long as his motives are pure.
      • Domino has luck that makes things work out so they "fall into place" for her.
      • One of the original Hellions was called Roulette and could generate both good or bad luck.

    • Teen Titans Animated had Jinx, who could cause bad luck.

    • Tex Avery had a cartoon, "Bad Luck Blackie" about black cats being bad luck -- but only as long as they were black. Paint them white, and the bad luck goes away.

    • Schoolhouse Rock had "Lucky 7 Sampson" -- a rabbit who had a 7 on the bottom of his foot. He was preternaturally lucky.
  • April 27, 2012
    ElCheViva
    The Felix Felicis potion in Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince.
  • April 28, 2012
    OneMore
    Items like luck potions don't fit there. The trope is about a character's (conscious) ability, similar to Elemental Powers.

    Also, some of the mentioned examples belong to Born Lucky instead.
  • April 28, 2012
    Arivne
    Tabletop Games
    • Champions.
      • A character could have the Luck power with the Usable on Others advantage, which would allow the character to make other creatures lucky.
      • Starting with 5th Edition, you can't buy the Unluck disadvantage with the Usable on Others advantage and use it to make other people unlucky. However, you can use a Transform attack to change them into someone who's unlucky.
  • April 28, 2012
    Koveras
    Do the Luck Dragons from The Neverending Story count? Although they don't have conscious control over it, they are constantly surrounded by a sort of "good luck aura", which makes them and anyone who earns their liking succeed in risky endeavors by pure luck.
  • April 28, 2012
    aurora369
    Morgoth, the God Of Evil from The Silmarillion, claimed the title "Master of fate" and thus cursed Hurin and his descendants. And yes, Hurin's children were plagued by misfortune.
  • April 28, 2012
    captainsandwich
  • April 28, 2012
    DVAcme
    Intacto, a Spanish film starring Max Von Sydow. The movie's plot involves people who are a sort of "luck vampire" being able to suck a person's luck away to add to their own.
  • May 2, 2012
    Arivne
    Comic Books
    • In the Marvel Universe, the character Black Cat (Felicia Hardy) originally had (and eventually regained) the power to give "bad luck" to her opponents.

    Tabletop Games
    • Dungeons And Dragons
      • 1st Edition
        • Fiend Folio. A Tween improves the luck of its host. Each time the host's controller has to roll dice for it, they get to roll twice and take the better result. Those creatures associated with the host don't fare so well: they have to roll twice and take the worse result.
        • Monster Manual II. The Luck Eater drains and feeds on the luck of all creatures within 30 feet of it, worsening their saving throws, chance to hit and the damage they inflict. It stays with the same creatures for 2-5 hours, after which it's sated and leaves.
  • May 4, 2012
    something990
    The Lucksuckers in Beyond Zork. They drain your Luck stat and can only be defeated by throwing a good luck charm at them.
  • May 4, 2012
    BlackDragon
    The titular Lucky Bunny from the Show Within A Show, The Lucky Bunny Bounty Show (an anime parody) from El Goonish Shive. Apparently, she creates greater varieties in luck for those close to her - as she puts it, "Luck doesn't mean GOOD luck" - so her Bounty Hunter partner keeps stumbling into improbably dangerous situations, yet luckily surviving. So essentially she does BOTH - at the same time.
  • May 4, 2012
    JobanGrayskull
    • In Skyrim the Daedric prince Nocturnal gives luck to his followers (this is especially important to the Thieves Guild).
    • Victini in Pokemon is said to have this power.
  • May 4, 2012
    cygnavamp
    • The luck virus in one episode of Red Dwarf. Lister injected himself with it and found whatever he needed just lying around.
  • May 4, 2012
    randomsurfer
    The Scarlet Witch's original version of her "Chaos Magic" was essentially weaponized Bad Luck. It caused probability changes to whoever she cast it against - like if she cast it against Cyclops his Eye Beams would ricochet incorrectly compared to how he wanted them to go.
  • May 5, 2012
    BrentLaabs
    Seriously, this got a hat? A one-sentence description with three examples in the text?

    condottiera: I decided to read about Just My Luck on The Other Wiki; seems like a borderline case. (see also my Magical Kiss YKTTW)

    Bisected8: The Pathfinder example: I see the flavor difference, but mechanically that's basically just the same as a bane spell, right? Since the whole game is run on dice, it's hard to tell the difference.

    Edit: removed some examples I mistakenly rejected earlier.
  • May 5, 2012
    Generality
    For games, there is a Luck Manipulation Mechanic.
  • May 6, 2012
    BrentLaabs
    I finally got tired of having an unclear description and wrote a new one.
  • May 6, 2012
    AMillionSkies
    How is this different from Winds Of Destiny Change?
  • May 6, 2012
    BrentLaabs
    ^ Apparently TRS wanted a slightly different trope in this discussion, so here it is. I'm not sure if I agree with the logic of it either, but I at least want to make this proposal not suck.

    Also, from the description: "Compare with Winds Of Destiny Change, which is a power based on probability instead of luck."
  • May 8, 2012
    OneMore
    I'm leaving the wiki, so the YKTTW is now as Up For Grabs as they get. Good luck.
  • May 8, 2012
    BrentLaabs
    Apparently I'm grabbing it, at least for now. Added most of the examples, with a couple of questions:

    Also I'm not seeing a huge narrative difference between "character has an ability to create luck" and "character has an ability to create a magic potion that creates luck", because the effects on the plot will be very similar. So I added the felix felicis potion.
  • May 9, 2012
    LordMelchior
    Here's a Web Original Example:
    • In Episode 1 of Harry Partridge's animation Starbarians, the main villain is the Evil Snake Wizard Siad, "who can bend the very fates to his own evil will."
  • May 9, 2012
    Andygal
    While it's not seen in story, the Alloy Of Law Ars Arcanum notes that Feruchemists can use chromium to store "fortune" which makes them unlucky when storing and lucky when they later tap the storage.
  • May 12, 2012
    Arivne
    Tabletop Games
    • Dungeons And Dragons
      • 3rd Edition
        • Supplement Relics & Rituals, spell "Enkili's Luck". When cast upon a character, the next time the character did something that required a die to be thrown to resolve the action (e.g. an attack or skill check), the roll would automatically be a 1, most likely causing the action to fail. In other words, the spell gave a one-use version of bad luck.
  • May 12, 2012
    HATI
    Supernatural had a rabbits foot which gave the holder good luck until they lost it, at which point they suffered bad luck that would almost always end ip killing them.
  • May 12, 2012
    MorganWick
    I still don't get the distinction from Winds Of Destiny Change. Can we get someone from the TRS in on this?

    Update: Read the thread, apparently it's about the probability of a particular event happening v. a character being lucky in general. Still, I could see someone like Vriska being problematic for that; I think "luck" powers are sometimes used to mean what we would be defining as "probability".
  • May 14, 2012
    BrentLaabs
    Yeah, I'm not sure I entirely get it either. It's primarily a flavor difference in application, and some works use both luck and probability when describing a power. It will be pretty difficult to tell the difference in those cases. But TRS wanted it; if they decide they don't want it later, they can always merge it back to Winds Of Destiny Change.
  • May 22, 2012
    BrentLaabs
    I'm bored of this one, so it's Up For Grabs again.
  • June 11, 2012
    Arivne
    I've just read the Winds Of Destiny Change page, and it's limited to "random and unlikely incidents happening spontaneously". All we have to do is define this trope as causing events that could occur naturally (i.e. general good luck) that don't include freak accidents.

    That will not only completely differentiate it from Winds Of Destiny Change, but fill in a gap left by that trope's limitation.

    Alternately, we could make this the Super Trope for "altering/controlling luck", and Winds Of Destiny Change would be a Sub Trope of it.

    Tabletop Games
    • Dungeons And Dragons (cont.)
      • 1st Edition
        • Deities and Demigods Cyclopedia.
          • The Hindu goddess Lakshmi has this power. Anyone she looks at with her right eye will automatically succeed on all saving throws and attacks they make in the next hour. Anyone she looks at with her left eye will fail on all such rolls during the next hour.
          • Kishijoten, the Japanese goddess of luck, gives good luck to those she favors. This allows them to always succeed on all saving throws and physical attacks.
        • Forgotten Realms boxed campaign set.
          • Beshaba is the deity of Misfortune and Ill Luck. All creatures that view her suffer from ill fortune.
          • Tymora is the goddess of Good Fortune and Luck. She grants good luck to people who demonstrate skill and innovation.
  • June 20, 2012
    Arivne
    Tabletop Games
    • Dungeons And Dragons
      • 1st Edition
        • Oriental Adventures supplement. Several Asian monsters are noted to be able to grant good fortune to others, such as the Hu Hsien and the Einsaung Nat.
  • June 20, 2012
    DarkConfidant
    In Wild AR Ms 3, the Luck Guardian Chapapanga grants this ability to the user of his medium. One ability is a static ability that keeps the wielder's luck in a positive direction, and another is a Force Ability that increases luck during battle.
  • June 20, 2012
    goplayer7
    Some more for Dungeons And Dragons: The Luck Domain for clerics and several of the feats/prestige classes in Complete Scoundrel (A whole section of feats called 'Luck Feats', Fortune's Friend class, probably others that I am missing). Both 3.5e that I know of, not sure about others.
  • July 10, 2012
    RJSavoy
    We need a shorted, less jargon-sounding title. Bringer of Fortune? Granting Luck? Or is there an existing term for this in folklore academia?
  • July 10, 2012
    NimmerStill
    Not sure it totally fits, but in the Final Destination series the freak accidents that occur could be interpreted as luck being manipulated by a mysterious, possibly sentient force. "Death", or whoever.
  • July 10, 2012
    spellraiser
    Supernatural: The episode "Bad Day at Black Rock" features a cursed rabbit's foot which brings spectacularly good luck to whoever has it , but as soon as that person loses the foot, the good luck turns into fatal bad luck.
  • July 10, 2012
    Blubble
    I read the Discworld books a long time ago, but I do remember that the Gods play some sort of destiny board game with mortals as pawns, and thus luck is pretty much equivalent to what the Gods have planned for you. They can grant or take it away at will. I also have a fuzzy memory of the Goddess of luck (the one with green eyes) helping Rincewind occasionally. If any troper is familiar with Discworld don't hesitate to help!

    note: added Ringworld example
  • July 10, 2012
    spellraiser
    Hang on though. I don't get the supposed difference between luck and probability. Isn't luck just having good improbable things happen to you, while bad luck is having bad improbable things happen to you?
  • July 10, 2012
    kjnoren
    Literature:
    • In Grand Central Arena by Ryk Spoor humanity after a time discover that all humans have a low-level and unconscious supernatural ability to influence probabilities to their advantage. It wasn't noticed earlier, since all humans had it.
  • July 10, 2012
    ccoa
    The difference is thus:

    • "Good luck" power: good things happen to you, but you have no control over what they are.
    • "Probability" power: you can increase or decrease the odds of something happening. In other words, you have control over what good things happen.

    To an outside observer, the results might look the same, but the difference is in the conscious control.
  • July 10, 2012
    Blubble
    @spellraiser In the context of tropes Probability can be both negative and positive, and more likely to relate to foreseeable events (such as the rope bridge breaking) while Luck is positive and more likely to create some unpredictable events such as accidentally pushing a stone that opens a treasure chamber. At least that's what I gleaned from the relevant entries.
  • July 10, 2012
    CobraPrime
    In Dungeons And Dragons
    • 3rd edition, the Fatespinner Prestige class has this as its powers.
    • In 4th edition, several of the Bard's Powers are flavored this way, like "Unluck", "Jynx Shot", "Inescapable Fate", "Rewrite the Future", "Sculpt Fate", "Satire of Fortune", "Virtuoso of Misfortune" and "Blunder".

    • In Shadowrun, this is an explicit power of Great Dragons: Twist Fate. This allows them to spend edge (The attribute for luck) differently than everyone and alter other creatures edge use. This part of the reason why Dragons are so terrifying as beside all the obvious dangers, luck is literally on their side.
  • July 10, 2012
    spellraiser
    Fair enough - but some of the examples from Winds Of Destiny Change need to be moved from there over to this one of course. My own Supernatural example is more this, for instance, but it's on the other one already and won't belong there if this gets approved.
  • July 10, 2012
    ceen
    Wait... so is the difference between probability and luck the difference between fighting on the edge of a cliff and having the ground break away under the opponent (probability) versus having the opponent step on some loose gravel and slip (bad luck)?
  • July 11, 2012
    Blubble
    @ceen I think ccoa's explanation is the best one.
  • July 11, 2012
    triassicranger
    @RJSavoy, I disagree with the title Bringer of Fortune and Granting Luck, due to the fact the trope description talks about the opposite as well.

    And now some examples:

    • An episode of Jackie Chan Adventures featured an episode with a gem that brought bad luck to whoever had it. The bad luck could only be passed on if the gem was given away willingly. If not, the person had bad luck for life.
    • An episode of Ben10 has Gwen pick up one of Charmcaster's gems, leading to Gwen's luck to start changing (becoming better). Unfortunately, the gem also takes away luck from others.
  • July 11, 2012
    kjnoren
    Closer reading of the trope shows that the Grand Central Arena example I offered doesn't fit.
  • July 11, 2012
    ccoa
    @Ceen the difference in that example would be this:

    • Good Luck: You and an opponent are fighting on a cliff. The cliff suddenly gives way only under your opponent, or he slips in gravel, or a bird randomly flies in his face, and you're saved through lucky chance.
    • Probability: You can an opponent are fighting on a cliff. You consciously make it more likely that the cliff will collapse under his feet. It does, saving you through your actions. Alternatively, you make it more likely that his weapon breaks, and it snaps the next time you hit it.

    With a probability superpower, you have control over the outcome. With a good luck power, it's outside your control.
  • July 11, 2012
    Rognik
    Anime example: Binbougami ga! has the main girl, Sakura, having a great deal of "fortune", and apparently sucks it up from those around her, even if she doesn't want to. The misfortune goddess, Mimoji, is able to leech this fortune out of her through various means.
  • July 11, 2012
    DrakeClawfang
    Skyrim, the Thieves' Guild is said to be on a streak of bad luck because they've lost favor with Nocturnal, the Daedric Prince of darkness. One member offers the explanation of her influence by saying that a lockpick breaking or a guard hearing you is your lack of skill, but the clouds parting and the moon lighting up a yard as you're sneaking across it? That's what Nocturnal's favor influences.
  • August 22, 2012
    ccoa
    Bumping this, as there is a TRS thread waiting on this. Anyone looking for a YKTTW feather for their hat, this one is Up For Grabs.
  • August 22, 2012
    NightNymph
    I'm still slightly confused as to how probability is distinct from the luck, because I know of an example from an episode of the X Files where the line might be blurred between the two types described. In the episode, a guy had incredibly good luck, but at the same time, that meant someone around him had to have bad luck to balance it out, similar to the anime example from Rognik above. The guy explained it as being a balance of probabilities type thing, and he was obsessed with probability because of this. He could not control the power, however, meaning that people he cared about around him could get bad luck, and potentially hurt, when something occurred where he needed good luck. So good luck did happen to him, but a law of averages/ probability thing was also involved and he had no control over where the bad luck would fall. He could only guess that it would be somewhat equal to his good luck. (And this was generally the case - if good luck was needed to save his life, often this would mean someone else nearby would end up seriously hurt or dead while the "luck" was saving him.)

    I am assuming in this case that it would most likely fall under the "luck" one, but the fact that probability is also involved a bit is kind of bugging me.
  • August 23, 2012
    ccoa
    If he can't control it, it's still luck. Just because it has the word "probability" in it doesn't make it a probability superpower as we define it. Tweaked the description so it's hopefully more clear.
  • September 29, 2012
    MrRuano
    • As a side effect of his actual power, Touma from A Certain Magical Index has this power also create some amount of bad luck for him. He never seems to anticipate when it will happen, and this power is pretty much why he isn't as much of a threat as could be.
  • September 29, 2012
    bulmabriefs144
    I'm nixing a hat.
    1. We have too many luck-based tropes. Butt Monkey is similar to Born Unlucky, Luck Manipulation Mechanic sounds too much like Random Number God only for players, and so on. We have a lot of similar tropes that need to seriosuly be weeded through to make sure they aren't just a case of The Same But More Specific. We don't need to split this trope.
    2. Winds Of Destiny Change is more comprehensive, involving not only luck powers, but some to do with fate. Since characters with luck powers usually have abilities to bend fate, this is a senseless distinction that makes people quibble "well that person has luck powers but not fate, this person has both." A trope that covers a general concept of fortune is fine. What I do think we need is a Blessings And Curses trope, that is, a blessing generally is something that affects positive luck anyway while a curse is sort of a bad luck spell. This too allows for broader usage, instead of having a too similar split.
    3. Winds Of Destiny Change is a cooler name. This just sounds contrived, and I can think of no good reason for it.

    I suggest some serious thought before launching. Whether this is a needed trope or just a split because someone doesn't get it. Whether this is the right name or concept (should it be luck manipulation, or more towards jinx powers). And what is meant by "luck" anyway, Dresden Files saw it as a sort of life force, Teen Titans defined bad luck as a sort of object decay ability, and other sources might put it hand in hand with Winds Of Destiny Change.

  • November 13, 2012
    Kernigh
    This trope is a duplicate of Winds Of Destiny Change; I don't accept the difference between luck and probability that is presented here.

    Suppose that I am gambling on a coin flip. If it lands on heads, I win 100 dollars; if it lands on tails, I lose 100 dollars. I have a 50% chance to win. Now, I cast my magic spell so that I win. Was it a probability spell, that increased the chance of heads to 100%, or a luck spell, that made me so lucky that I had to win? I don't find a difference.

    Winds Of Destiny Change is a power that adjusts the probability of good (or bad) luck. This trope is the same power.
  • November 13, 2012
    PaulA
    As I understand the OP's explanation, the distinction is this:

    • Winds Of Destiny Change is about affecting the probability of specific events; e.g. if a coin flip is important, you can increase the probability it will come up heads, without affecting the outcome of anything else.
    • This trope is about affecting how lucky or unlucky a given person in general; e.g. you can make yourself luckier, and everything will go well for you, including but not limited to the coin flip.
  • December 2, 2012
    morenohijazo
    There's a TRS thread depending on this YTTW.
  • December 2, 2012
    foxley
    The supervillain Hazard in The DCU (originally appearing in Infinity Inc) could cause good or bad luck in others by rolling a pair of magical dice.
  • December 5, 2012
    Kernigh
    If PaulA has the correct distinction, then we should fix the description.

    Right now it says:

    • Compare with Winds Of Destiny Change, which is a power based on probability instead of luck. Where with a probability superpower a character can consciously control the probability of specific outcomes, a luck superpower has no such conscious control and is far more random.

    It should say:

    • Compare with Winds Of Destiny Change, which is a power to control the probability of specific outcomes. To contrast, the Luck Manipulation Power has no such control and is far more random.

  • December 5, 2012
    troacctid
    That doesn't seem like a useful or meaningful distinction.
  • December 30, 2012
    Kernigh
    This proposal seems to have failed. It will not be launched because Winds Of Destiny Change will not be split. See discussion at http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/posts.php?discussion=1331483925029601000&page=2#39

    Motion To Discard.
  • January 13, 2013
    troacctid
    Second.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=xmiec05inlabzcct9v18z5xc&trope=DiscardedYKTTW