Widescreen Shot


(permanent link) added: 2010-08-04 12:30:03 sponsor: DragonQuestZ (last reply: 2010-08-04 14:00:26)

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People Sit on Chairs... in Cinemascope!

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While 3D films relied on "jump out" shots to show themselves off (until recently), widescreen films would rely on wide shots to show themselves off. At first, these were largely landscape shots, but as they didn't give people headaches, they were a lot more successful, and an integral part of Scenery Porn in films.

Later on directors such as David Lean and Akira Kurosawa used the format for more artistic shots, to the point where their widescreen films actually lose a lot in being cropped to 4:3 ratio.

Although landscapes are still some of the most common forms of widescreen showing shots, others include people far apart from each other or showing a huge crowd of people.

Film studios also marketed their formats in the early days, even if most were essentially the same (Cinerama was a big exception, utilizing three synchronized projectors over three standard ratio screens).

Notable shots in films:

  • The desert shots in Lawrence of Arabia
  • One of the few memorable images in Pearl Harbor was the shot of the Japanese planes flying in from behind the camera.
  • The Star Destroyer shot in A New Hope.
  • Kurosawa was fond of shots of Samurai standing far apart from each other, and was referenced at the end of Kill Bill part 1.
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