Created By: Valxam56 on November 20, 2012 Last Edited By: Valxam56 on September 24, 2014

Fake Feud

A feud is falsified for publicity stunt or other purposes.

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
Feuding is Older Than Print; wresting has its own staged feuds; television (and film) has the Feud Episode.

However, faking a feud is a trend that is often used to drum up publicity.

[[noreallife]]

Literature
  • In A Song of Ice and Fire,after gaining power in The Vale, the scheming Littlefinger stops the lords there from moving against him by having haan ally Lyn Corbay pretend to be his enemy and to challenge him to a duel while they were at dinner with other nobles (a breach of Sacred Hospitality). By having Corbay do this, Littlefinger makes it so that it would be dishonorable for any of his actual enemies to challenge him.
  • In The King of Attolia, two brothers Sejanus and Dite pretend to hate each other when in actuality, they have a close bond. Both they and their father are enemies of the king, and according to the plan, Sejanus would make actual treasonous plots while pretending to be the king's supporter, and in the meantime, Dite would seem like a harmless critic of the king (and their father would have plausible deniability).
  • At the beginning of Michael Chabon's novel Gentlemen Of The Road, the two protagonists, who are mercenaries/bandits/rogues con patrons at an inn by pretending to have an argument and stage a faked duel.

Live-Action TV
  • The Body of the Week on the Castle episode "Food to Die For" was a celebrity chef who had previously appeared on a dueling cooks Reality Show. His in-show rival was brought in for questioning since she'd threatened to kill him on-air, but she points out that in "Reality Show", the emphasis is on "show": the series played up their feud for ratings and she didn't really have any reason to want him dead (even second place had gotten her enough name recognition for a successful catering business).
  • Star Trek: Voyager has Paris pretending to be a malcontent for several episodes, so he can leave the ship and infiltrate the Kazons.

Theater
  • In The Fantasticks as well as the original play Les Romanesques, two fathers who are friends pretend to be mortal enemies in order to invoke Star-Crossed Lovers in their children and get them to fall in love.

Web Original

Western Animation
  • On The Boondocks, Ann Coulter and Rev Rollo Goodlove are both pretending to oppose each other on TV, but in reality Ann Coulter is just performing her role.

Community Feedback Replies: 26
  • November 20, 2012
    Jordan
    • In The Fantasticks as well as the original play Les Romanesques, two fathers who are friends pretend to be mortal enemies in order to invoke Star Crossed Lovers in their children and get them to fall in love.
    • In A Song Of Ice And Fire,after gaining power in The Vale, the scheming Littlefinger stops the lords there from moving against him by having haan ally Lyn Corbay pretend to be his enemy and to challenge him to a duel while they were at dinner with other nobles (a breach of Sacred Hospitality). By having Corbay do this, Littlefinger makes it so that it would be dishonorable for any of his actual enemies to challenge him.
    • In The King of Attolia, two brothers Sejanus and Dite pretend to hate each other when in actuality, they have a close bond. Both they and their father are enemies of the king, and according to the plan, Sejanus would make actual treasonous plots while pretending to be the king's supporter, and in the meantime, Dite would seem like a harmless critic of the king (and their father would have plausible deniability).
    • At the beginning of Michael Chabon's novel Gentlemen Of The Road, the two protagonists, who are mercenaries/bandits/rogues con patrons at an inn by pretending to have an argument and stage a faked duel.
  • November 20, 2012
    StarSword
    Live Action TV
    • The Body Of The Week on the Castle episode "Food to Die For" was a celebrity chef who had previously appeared on a dueling cooks Reality Show. His in-show rival was brought in for questioning since she'd threatened to kill him on-air, but she points out that in "Reality Show", the emphasis is on "show": the series played up their feud for ratings and she didn't really have any reason to want him dead (even second place had gotten her enough name recognition for a successful catering business).
  • November 20, 2012
    reub2000
    • On The Boondocks, Ann Coulter and Rev Rollo Goodlove are both pretending to oppose each other on TV, but in reality Ann Coulter is just performing her role.

    Also, I'm going to suggest no real life examples, period.
  • November 21, 2012
    Arivne
    ^ A Real Life Example should only be allowed if the parties involved have publicly admitted that their feud was false. If it's only alleged or believed to be false, it doesn't count.
  • November 21, 2012
    NimmerStill
    • Star Trek Voyager has Paris pretending to be a malcontent for several episodes, so he can leave the ship and infiltrate the Kazons.
    • Real Life and as portrayed in Man On The Moon: the rivalry between Andy Kaufman and Jerry Lawler was faked for entertainment, as Lawler admitted for Real Life by appearing as himself in the movie.
    Spoiler-rich trope, by the way, so maybe we can un-spoiler the Voyager example.
  • December 25, 2012
    randomsurfer
    The Nostalgia Critic and The Angry Video Game Nerd had a feud played for laughs, culminating in the TGWTG Year One Brawl.
  • December 25, 2012
    reub2000
    Is this Up For Grabs?
  • December 26, 2012
    Arivne
    ^ It's been less than two months since the OP Valxam56 created it, so according to the Up For Grabs page it isn't.
  • December 26, 2012
    WeAreAllKosh
    ^^^^ I've been wondering if spoilery examples should go onto YKTTW pages, or wait until after launching. I've deleted some of my own examples on YKTTW pages (after second thought) for that reason, figuring that oftentimes spoilers aren't warned about on YKTTW pages, and the proposers/launchers themselves, while being somewhat compelled to read the examples given to decide if they belong (and thus add them to the prelaunch page), may not have seen that particular work and not want it spoiled for them.

    Is there a protocol for avoiding spoilers on YKTTW pages? Maybe there should be, although that may be difficult by nature for some proposed tropes.
  • December 27, 2012
    reub2000
    Spoiler tags work on YKKTW?

    Also, the Needs A Better Description. If anyone wants to edit the desciption, go ahead.

    Also, for now it's No Real Life Examples. I'm willing to put the issue up for a vote on the special efforts thread.
  • December 28, 2012
    Antigone3
    I don't know if this would count as Literature or Real Life, but there were some public debates in the early 1930s between mystery authors Ellery Queen and Barnaby Ross. Both "authors" were actually pseudonyms for the writing team of Manfred Lee and Frederic Dannay. For the debates, one of the cousins would play Queen and the other Ross (both wearing masks).
  • December 28, 2012
    spideydude
    In the movie Wag The Dog, as re-election approaches, the US President's advisors create a fake war with Albania, including a fake American hero nicknamed "The Old Shoe", to garner patriotic publicity and turn attention away from a presidential sex scandal.
  • December 28, 2012
    WeAreAllKosh
    ^^^ Yes, spoiler tags do work on YKTTW. However, if you're the trope proposer and you're cutting-and-pasting examples onto the draft page, you'd see what's in the tags unless you purposely don't read what you're cutting and pasting. However, if you don't read the example, how will you know if what it describes (given that all good examples are descriptive) actually fits the trope you're proposing?

    Maybe not that big a deal, I've just wondered about it, and have tried to refrain from giving examples that are too spoilery, anyway. However, the nature of some tropes (like many death tropes) may make this impossible to avoid.
  • December 29, 2012
    reub2000
    I won't mind. Post them.
  • January 9, 2013
    Waterlily
    This is assumed to be the case in The Wrestler with Randy "The Ram" Robinson and "The Ayatollah" his archnemesis from his glory days of wrestling.

    We don't see them in their heyday but there's no feud at the time the film is set.
  • January 9, 2013
    Valxam56
    It is still Up For Grabs; I'm researching this still, but in any case you can do what you want with the trope. I can always edit the main trope page later if this becomes a trope.
  • January 10, 2013
    AgProv
    95% of American professional wrestling. Isn't there a South Park episode about this, where the acting - getting your lines right and delivering them beleivably - becomes twenty times more important than actual physical wrestling?
  • August 27, 2014
    Ingonyama
    What about the specific example of people who pretend to be feuding in order to make someone else give themselves away (as an enemy, that they have something the feuders want, etc.)? Would that be a subtrope of this, or something related but different?
  • August 27, 2014
    Ingonyama
    Also, two examples from Wheel Of Time: Rand and Perrin fake a falling-out so that the latter can be sent away on a secret mission (to find the demagogue Masema and bring him to heel), while later Mat (inspired by the first example) fakes a falling-out with Tuon to flush out The Mole among the Seanchan.
  • September 23, 2014
    Cider
    • In WSU, Becky Bayless and Alicia staged a feud to advance themselves through the rankings by making each other look good. The ruse was blown when Alicia had to defend the WSU championship in a triple threat match, where she could lose without being pinned and Bayless ran out to ensure that did not happen.
  • September 23, 2014
    justanotherrandomlurker
    Live Action TV
    • MASH. Hawkeye and B.J. fake a fight between each other for Frank's amusement as a birthday present to him; the fight becomes real after Frank mentions to Hawkeye the things B.J. said about him behind his back.
  • September 23, 2014
    IndirectActiveTransport
  • September 23, 2014
    FlyingDuckManGenesis
    • In the Arthur episode, "Best Enemies", the Merkle family comes to visit the Read family, and their daughter, W.D., is the same age as D.W.. They don't get along at first, as their interests are quite different. Specifically, W.D. is more interested in race cars, while D.W. is more interested in unicorns. When the Reads visit the Merkles, W.D. and D.W. try to start a feud so they can break up with each other. However, they have a lot of fun planning the feud, to the point that W.D. is sorry D.W. has to leave.
  • September 23, 2014
    dalek955
    • In The Legend Of Drizzt, the mercenary captain Jarlaxle's two senior lieutenants pretend to fight all the time (when in fact they're close allies) so that Jarlaxle won't think of them as a threat to his position. Jarlaxle actually knows what they're up to, but lets them get away with it in the certain and happy knowledge that neither of them wants his job anyway.
  • September 24, 2014
    DAN004
  • September 24, 2014
    Alvin
    Live Action Television: The TV-movie "Malice In Wonderland" portrays a real-life feud between two gossip columnists as if it might have been this. Literature: In the Agatha Christie mystery The Mysterious Affair At Styles the woman loudly denouncing an obvious suspect in a murder in his secret lover and accomplice.
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