Created By: WolfBloodstone on August 30, 2012

Creative Battle Strategies

For any fight that doesn't end in a Deus ex Machina, you need a creative way to win.

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In any given fight, it's perfectly possible to win via smashing. But in fiction, the protagonist always seems to come up against an opponent that cannot be defeated by simple means, and thus requires a special Creative Battle Strategy to defeat.
Community Feedback Replies: 10
  • August 30, 2012
    rodneyAnonymous
    "For any fight that doesn't end in a Deus ex Machina..."

    Could you rephrase that, in English?
  • August 31, 2012
    vampiriccannibal
    sounds like it means that any fight that doesn't end in a random, un-foreshadowed event (i.e, a Deus Ex Machina), ends because a plan concocted by the heroes, which is a very Creative Strategy, is enacted.

    I'll give this a couple of tags.
  • August 31, 2012
    randomsurfer
    During a Bar Brawl in the Hercules The Legendary Journeys Made For TV Movie "Hercules in the Underworld" the Girl Of The Week demonstrates to Herc that there are ways of resolving conflict besides beating it into submission - the man who was destroying the bar had simply burned his mouth on the stew, which they never would have known if he had been knocked out. This comes back when Hercules is in the Underworld capturing Cerberus: instead of punching him, Herc talks gently and pats his head.
  • August 31, 2012
    WolfBloodstone
    Okay, so a fight that ends in Deus ex Machina would be, like, in The Titan's Curse by Rick Riordan, where the hero is getting overwhelmed by a manticore at the beginning, and then the goddess Artemis shows up and annihilates. An example of Creative Battle Strategy I'd thought of but didn't know how to put in would be Coop, the Hero of Megas XLR, who always prefers to defeat enemies by smashing, but always uses something else because EVERYTHING he fights seems to be too big to smash, i.e. blocking out the sun so the solar-powered evil robot would die, teleporting a Slushie onto the control panel of an enemy ship. One episode takes this Up To Eleven by having him fight an entire freaking living planet and he (accidentally) launches Rock Pops and soda into its core, which, as learned earlier in the episode, made it explode.
  • August 31, 2012
    rodneyAnonymous
    I don't mean explain it to me. I mean in the laconic. What do you mean, without jargon or foreign words?
  • August 31, 2012
    WolfBloodstone
    Also, in the Pokemon anime, every one of Ash's league strategies seems to be this: using Charizard to turn water into steam, making Snorlax's Protect deal damage, blowing up a roof so Buizel's Swift Swim would take effect. His first gym battle EVER had Pikachu use an electric attack on the sprinklers to make them go off all over Brock's Onix (who has a weakness to water).
  • August 31, 2012
    polarbear2217
    Would Haymitch using the force field to make the rock come back and kill the girl in Catching Fire count?
  • August 31, 2012
    WolfBloodstone
    Definitely. It was a means of winning a fight against a stronger opponent, it did not rely on a Deus ex Machina, and it was quite creative in its execution.
  • August 31, 2012
    WolfBloodstone
    And about the thing in Pokemon, there's actually so many that that should probably have its own page or something.
  • August 31, 2012
    WolfBloodstone
    Question: Do you all think that Harry understanding Temporal Paradox enough to defeat the dementors in Prisoner of Azkaban counts? If not, Accio Firebolt in Goblet of Fire should.
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