Created By: CaveCat on October 30, 2013 Last Edited By: CaveCat on February 3, 2014
Troped

Noah's Story Arc

Building an ark in the emergency of an incoming flood, a lot like the Biblical figure, Noah.

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There is a flood coming, so you put most of the earth's life in a large vessel. When the flood finally hits, you and your animal passengers are safe from the flood while aboard the ark that you were able to build.

The Trope Namer and Trope Codifier would be the story of Noah from The Bible, who was told by God to build an ark in order to preserve his family and two of every single animal in order to be protected from the flood.

Not to be confused with Noah's Arc.


Examples:

Anime and Manga
  • In Spriggan, it's depicted to be created by an ancient race as an out-of-place artifact which not only carried dinosaurs and mythical creatures, it's also used as a weather control device that can bring about drastic changes to the Earth's weather, including the threat of global flooding.
  • In the first season of Dragon Ball GT, Bulma just happens to have one of these tucked away beneath the Capsule Corporation in order to evacuate everyone to the new planet created by Baby with the Blackstar balls.
    • Considering the number of times Earth has been nearly (or actually) destroyed in this franchise, that might be more Justified than it sounds.
  • In Tengen Toppa Gurren Lagann, the Arc-Gurren is used to house the population of Kamina City in space when the moon is on a collision course with earth.

Comic Books
  • Nero: In the story "The Ark Of Nero" Nero builds an ark and even has lots of animals imported to bring along with him. Everyone says he's crazy, but as it turns out the tide does come. In the end it was All Just a Dream.

Film
  • Evan Almighty, the 2007 sequel to 2003's Bruce Almighty, had the title character from the former assume the role of Noah when God informs him to make an ark because of an incoming flood.
  • The underground refuge in Deep Impact, designed to ensure continuity of the species in the face of an impending extinction-force impact, is called the Arc.
  • In 2012, there are great disasters all around the world, particularly a giant flood. The small portion of the populace try to escape this fate by building giant arks in the Himalayas. In one shot, some animals are brought in such as giraffes and elephants. One of the protagonists is a young boy named Noah.
  • Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow. Dr. Totenkopf believed that Earth was doomed due to the destructive nature of humanity, so he built a rocket ship to carry two of every animal on Earth (and genetically engineered humans) to another planet. He intended them to create a technological utopia there.
  • Ice Age: The Meltdown: All the herds head for a giant log that would serve as a boat when the flood waters come.
  • Moonraker: Drax created his space station to hold the humans who would repopulate the Earth after the deadly spores killed everyone on the surface. When the two leads see that their space shuttle is carrying a cargo of men and women.
  • Is one of the episodes in the 1936 Warner Bros.. film The Green Pastures, which retold The Bible from the perspective of a poor African-American child.
  • Fantasia 2000 has a segment where Donald Duck is a deckhand on Noah's ark responsible for getting the animals onboard, including two non-anthropomorphic ducks.

Literature
  • The Clive Cussler novel Arctic Drift Features the villains attempt to cause the End of the World as We Know It and survive in four megaships to found a Master Race.
  • In Discworld, there's an Urban Legend about the founding of Ankh-Morpork that tells how a wise man foretold a Great Flood, gathered his family and hundreds of animals into a big ship, and rode it out. After a few weeks' sailing, the accumulated wastes from all the animals were filling up the vessel, so they tipped all the manure over the side, and built a city on the resulting dung-island.
  • Utnapishtim from The Epic of Gilgamesh is the Ur-Example and Trope Maker, pre-dating Noah's story from The Bible. Similarly to his biblical counterpart, he built a giant ship called The Preserver of Life to save his family, friends and all the animals from a flood. He was granted immortality afterwards.
  • Parodied in The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. The main characters are teleported to Golgafrinchan Ark Fleet Ship B. Which seems like a Ark, but is actually a trick to get its inhabitants off the planet.
  • Joked about in Holes. The kids see a cloud in the sky, the first they've ever seen in this arid desert, and start joking about how they need to start building an ark. It's all just to get their hopes up, as Camp Green Lake hasn't had rain for a hundred years.
  • When Worlds Collide (Literature and Film versions): a pair of rogue planets are on a direct path to hit Earth. Scientists and governments rush to make a pair of rocket ships to hold the best of the best (and supplies) to send to another planet so humanity won't be extinguished.

Live-Action TV
  • A scammer-slash-crazy guy used this and built an ark in CSI NY once. He offered rides, made off with the victims' money, and was found dead inside the ark with his animals.

Newspaper Comics
  • Boner's Ark, a gag-a-day strip about Captain Boner and the various animals on his ark. (Noah had it easy - Boner's ark was on the sea for 32 years, only reaching dry land in the final strip.)
  • Just a Pilgrim: the role of the ark is taken by a space shuttle containing genetic sequences of thousands of animals so life can be started elsewhere, as the planet is now under the control of sentient mind-controlling jellyfish.
  • In Jules Feiffer's satirical "The Deluge," an installment of his Feiffer comic strip for the Village Voice, an angel instructs U.S. civil servant Harvey Noah to build an ark. Instead of doing so himself, he takes the matter to his supervisor. This starts a bureaucratic chain of events which culminates in the ark housing only selected members of Congress. As it starts to rain, Harvey attempts to board the vessel, only to be told he's not on the list.

Video Games
  • This is Johannes von Schicksal's plan in God Eater Burst.
    Basically, The Aegis Project was just a front for a secret Ark Project which involved a certain Macguffin Girl being some sort of key that will give Johaness he power of God, where a select few population were to be shipped to the moon while the rest of the world are to be nuked to oblivion along with the aragami. it should be noted though that the one who planned all this had no intention of being with the ones to repopulate the earth though, knowing well how extreme his actions are.
  • Parodied in Team Fortress 2's "Meet The Soldier" video:
    Soldier: ...Then [Sun Tzu] used his fight money to buy two of every animal on Earth, and then he herded them onto a boat, and then he beat the crap out of every single one!
  • The main character in Terranigma is named Ark. Why? He's The Chosen One who has the power to revive the dead surface of the earth and all its inhabitants.

Western Animation
  • In a The Simpsons Treehouse of Horror episode spoofing Y2K, after Homer's blunder destroys all electronics on Earth the US govenerment sends two rockets off: one with the best of the best (Lisa is invited) and one which Homer & Bart sneak on to which is aimed directly at the sun.
  • There was at least one Animaniacs sketch called "Noah's Lark" that went like this. Buster and Babs walked up and stated they were no relation, so Noah let them on, along with the Hip Hippos.

Needs More Examples Description Needs Help
Community Feedback Replies: 75
  • October 30, 2013
    Ominae
    • In Spriggan, it's depicted to be created by an ancient race as an out-of-place artifact which not only carried dinosaurs and mythical creatures, it's also used as a weather control device that can bring about drastic changes to the Earth's weather, including the threat of global flooding.
  • October 30, 2013
    chicagomel
    A scammer-slash-crazy guy used this and built an ark in CSI NY once. He offered rides, made off with the vixtims' money, and was found dead inside the ark with his animals.
  • October 30, 2013
    Larkmarn
    How about Noahs Archetype for a name?

    ... as much as I love that name, this is probabably sufficiently covered by The Ark.
  • October 31, 2013
    KarjamP
    Nevermind.
  • November 1, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    ^^ this is a Plot Trope; not a Character Trope, or even Seaborne And Submersible Vehicles.

    and The Ark is about The Ark, not the plot. just like a Forbidden Fruit does not necessarily cover an Adam And Eve Plot.

    Videogames Basically, The Aegis Project was just a front for a secret Ark Project which involved a certain Macguffin Girl being some sort of key that will give Johaness he power of God, where a select few population were to be shipped to the moon while the rest of the world are to be nuked to oblivion along with the aragami. it should be noted though that the one who planned all this had no intention of being with the ones to repopulate the earth though, knowing well how extreme his actions are.
  • November 1, 2013
    StarSword
    ^FYI, Adam And Eve Plot does not mean what you think it means.
  • November 1, 2013
    Generality
    I think the plot is Fling A Light Into The Future.
  • November 1, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    ^^ which is related to my point. which is "just because a story has an ark, doesn't mean it would use the noah's ark plot."

    I understand from memory that Adam And Eve Plot is when a guy and a girl are Last Of Their Kind and are expected to fuck their way to overpopulation. also when people plot/are designated to be the adam/eve. and iirc the trope namers don't count.
  • November 1, 2013
    KarjamP
    ^^That trope's for preserving in case of an end-of-a-world destruction so that the thing/person/people that's being preserved can be a warning to people about what happened (incidentally, I found some misuse there, particularly in the Real Life section), while this one's about preserving animals and some people when a flood comes so that life isn't totally annihilated.
  • November 1, 2013
    DAN004
    • Parodied in Team Fortress 2's Meet The Soldier video:
      Soldier: ...Then [Sun Tzu] uses his fight money to buy 2 of every animal on earth, and then he put them all into a boat, and then he beat the crap out of every single one!
  • November 1, 2013
    Generality
    ^^ Be that as it may, I don't think that there's sufficient reason to make a separate trope page for the plot element of The Ark. The two are intrinsically connected. Any time an Ark appears, the plot associated with it is going to appear, at least in backstory; and any time an Ark plot is used, the actual ark has to appear at some point. There just isn't enough distinction between them.
  • November 2, 2013
    DAN004
    Of course, I believe that plots that invoke Noah's Ark doesn't literally have to involve flood. It merely have to involve a giant ark that acts as a preservation storage; actual giant disaster happening is optional but there needs to be a mention of the disaster.
  • November 2, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    ^^ i beg to differ, The Ark trope as it is now is about a hugeass vessel or anything called ark; so it doesn't necessarily follow that it covers the plot any more than Adam And Eve Plot would be about the trope namers, a snake, and a fruit.

    in fact, some examples there fit better here.

    for one, in Raiders Of The Lost Ark, the ark is a Box (something mentioned in The Ark's page) Mac Guffin, but the plot is no show.

    for another, in my God Eater Burst example, only the plot itself is of importance to the story. The Ark is even a no show. though its probably because of technical limitations.
  • November 2, 2013
    Generality
    The Ark as a trope is about a large vessel which is used to secure (some part of) a population against a disaster. It says so in literally the first sentence on that page. It's not about anything called "ark". The Ark of the Covenant does not appear on that page, and if it did, I would remove it. I understand that there are several variations in how the Ark is interpreted in story, but that's because Tropes Are Flexible.
  • November 2, 2013
    DAN004
    What about making this an Internal Subtrope?
  • November 2, 2013
    Larkmarn
    I don't really see the point to that. What, precisely, would the subtrope be? It doesn't seem distinct from the page itself.
  • November 3, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    ^ it's more of a Sister Trope from how i see it.
    as said, you can feature The Ark as a vessel that already houses life or is a vessel called "Ark" (e.g. Titan AE, WALL-E,One Piece), and hence exclude the "flood" part since it's already After The End.

    and likewise, have a "put the biosphere in a ship" plot while minimally featuring or not featuring The Ark at all.


    Generality

    I know that. however:
    Derived from a Latin word for "chest" (see also the Ark of the Covenant), an ark is now best known as a vessel
    it also says so right there in the first sentence that it technically speaking, is still an ark (there's also the Terranigma example who isn't even a box yet somehow still counts due to the guess what? plot part).

    what you're saying would be like not mentioning Adam and Eve in Adam And Eve Plot because they don't actually count.
  • November 3, 2013
    mythbuster
    The underground refuge in Deep Impact, designed to ensure continuity of the species in the face of an impending extinction-force impact, is called the Arc.
  • November 4, 2013
    DashSpendar
    This isn't distinct from The Ark. MTD.
  • November 4, 2013
    lakingsif
    Two Thousand Twelve (yay Zero Context Example, but really the plot is a 'Noah's Ark Plot' and your description has that).
  • November 4, 2013
    DAN004
    I'm suggesting bringing The Ark to TRS. Anyone?
  • November 4, 2013
    Larkmarn
    Why?
  • November 4, 2013
    mew4ever23
    I can't see the difference from The Ark either, and yes it is about this kind of plot. MTD.

    ^^ I await defense of that position.
  • November 4, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    So there isn't a difference between The Ark(a large vessel for safekeeping life) and Noahs Ark Plot(safekeeping life from impending doom). fair enough.

    and yet there's enough a difference between Bulletproof Human Shield (a highly effective meastshield) from Human Shield (a... meatshield) for it to warrant its own page when it's obviously just a The Same But More Specific trope?
  • November 4, 2013
    mew4ever23
    ^Please, for the love of god, go read the pages you're linking.

    Direct quote from Human Shield: "A Sister Trope is Bulletproof Human Shield, where your attacker(s) callously open fire anyway — only to have their shots blocked by the victim you're holding. The distinction is psychological protection ("You wouldn't dare hurt this innocent victim!") versus physical protection."

    That's a topic for the forum though. The point here, is that if you'd bothered to read The Ark's description, you'd see that it details exactly this plot - saving life from impending doom, rather than the means of doing so.
  • November 4, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    ^ listen to yourself, that's what i've been saying here all along (that it is distinct, that is).

    a trope about the titular vessel vs a trope about the plot the vessel is used on

    as repeatedly mentioned (which somehow no one says is not a distiction),

    you can use the plot without featuring the ark and use the ark without featuring the plot.

    how the hell is this somehow not a distinction?

    @your edit. i did read it, and it does say that it's about the vessel and merely mentions the plot, if it was more about the plot it would be under Plots, which it is not.
  • November 4, 2013
    Generality
    I disagree; I don't think it is possible to have one without the other, and I have yet to see an example of such a separation. The distinction is theoretical at best.
  • November 5, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    ^ *headdesk*, you think i've been saying that here without backing them up?

    see 2013-11-03 11:37:21; 2013-11-02 08:07:18; 2013-11-01 03:06:04

    or if i must, ripped straight The Ark:

    vessel without plot, or at least, implies it was made before "the flood" as a precaution:
    • Fishman Island in One Piece has a gigantic ark named 'Noah' in the slums.
    • The underground refuge in Deep Impact, designed to ensure continuity of the species in the face of an impending extinction-force impact, is called the Arc.
    • Ishra's Ark, a large airship of indeterminate origin, serves as one of the most memorable levels of Klonoa 2
    • Shows up in a space variant in Captain Planet And The Planeteers, with the alien who has a ship that's a refuge for animals extinct in their homelands. It's referred to as 'The Ark' at times.
    • The Space Colony ARK from a handful of Sonic The Hedgehog titles is apparently a long-term habitable structure, but has remained inactive for the majority of the time we see it, staying in orbit over the planet.

    implies the plot via backstory, but is otherwise about the vessel:
    • The ship that originally brought Superman to earth, along with a database containing the history and culture of Krypton. His father Jor-El wanted to make ships big enough to save all of Krypton's people, but Krypton's xenophobic policies banning space travel got in his way. He only had enough time and resources to build one little ship.
    • Crops up in XX Xenophile, of all places. In "Family Reunion", salvalger Otis discovers the U.N.S.S. Rojong, the first colonization slowship from Old Terra, presumed lost in space. The bio-pods are intact and should contain all of the 'lost' animals: elephants, fireflies, anteaters, unicorns...
    • The eponymous Titan in Titan AE, a ship holding the DNA of all known Earth organisms and the capacity to recreate the planet from scratch.
    • In WALL-E humanity abandons a ruined Earth in a fleet of spaceships. The Axiom is sending out probes - such as EVE - to find viable life on Earth but the "ark" takes on a mind of its own and tries to prevent a return.
    • In the backstory of Trigun, there was Project SEEDs, a series of generation-ships, with most of its occupants in cold sleep while it searched for another habitable planet.

    is about the plot itself, usually features the ark, or have it as an offscreen Mac Guffin whose presence or absence will not change the plot progression until the boarding part
    • Ice Age: The Meltdown: All the herds head for a giant log that would serve as a boat when the flood waters come.
    • In the first season of Dragon Ball GT, Bulma just happens to have one of these tucked away beneath the Capsule Corporation in order to evacuate everyone to the new planet created by Baby with the Blackstar balls.
      • Considering the number of times Earth has been nearly (or actually) destroyed in this franchise, that might be more Justified than it sounds.
    • In Tengen Toppa Gurren Lagann, the Arc-Gurren is used to house the population of Kamina City in space when the moon is on a collision course with earth.
    • Evan Almighty is basically a modern retelling of the original story of Noah, with a few twists (most notably, the flood comes not from rain but from a dam breaking).
    • Moonraker: Drax created his space station to hold the humans who would repopulate the Earth after the deadly spores killed everyone on the surface. When the two leads see that their space shuttle is carrying a cargo of men and women:
    • Is one of the episodes in the 1936 Warner Bros. film The Green Pastures, which retold The Bible from the perspective of a poor African-American child.
    • The main character in Terranigma is named Ark. Why? He's The Chosen One who has the power to revive the dead surface of the earth and all its inhabitants.
  • November 5, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    o_o forgot to mention: to make the long story short, my point is:

    The distinction is that you can have The Ark in a story without bothering with "The Great Flood" and "Mass Migration Plot" by having it either Before The End or After The End. so it's there as a failsafe or something like a Domed Home Town.

    likewise you can have Noahs Ark Plot without the ark, since it's about the plot. whether or not there is even an ark the story won't change because it's about "putting two of each in a boat", not the boat itself.
  • November 5, 2013
    DAN004
    So for example Film/{{2012}} has a lot of Arks. It is also a film of big disaster, a big flood in particular, and one shot reveals many kind of animals brought in alongside a couple of human population.

    I suppose that makes it this trope, then?

    So what I'm thinking is that Noah Ark Plot will need more definition and get closer to, well, the plot of Noah's Ark. Not every story that has The Ark will follow the plot of Noah's Ark. Is that what you're thinking, sir Shanghai Slave?
  • November 6, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    Dont Call Me Sir, Monsignor DAN 004-dono. and yes, that is exactly what i am saying. and yeah, that one fits here.

    the only reason i'm rabidly defending this one is because everyone else is simply "NOT DISTINCT FROM THE ARK >> MOTION TO DISCARD" without actually analyzing whether Noahs Ark Plot is tropeable or not.

    At the moment, yes, it's not distinct; but only because of the confusing description of The Ark.
  • November 6, 2013
    DAN004
    ^ Lol.

    That said, then The Ark needs... a bit fixing.
  • November 9, 2013
    xanderiskander
    The hell is everybody jumping on the discard bandwagon on this for?? The Ark is about a Public Domain Artifact, and otherwise doesn't require it to have any meaning for the plot of a work. This is about a Whole Plot Reference. It needs a bit of work, but it's just as tropeworthy as the Moby Schtick is in relation to literature.

    I suggest calling this Noahs Story Arc for the pun
  • November 9, 2013
    Prfnoff
    "The Ark is about a Public Domain Artifact"? That's not how the description reads, and wouldn't cover most of the examples.
  • November 9, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    ^^ pure genius. but the pun can easily be lost. just Noahs Arc works if that's the case IMO. bonus points for the plot usually taking up a few episodes or much of the runtime if in the movies.

    @down, didn't notice that. checked the page and it's about LGBT. wtf...
  • November 9, 2013
    Snicka
    Noahs Story Arc is a good potential trope name. The title Noahs Arc already belongs to a TV show.
  • November 13, 2013
    DAN004
    I'll reword my example
    • In Two Thousand Twelve, there are great disasters all around the world, particularly a giant flood. The small portion of the populace try to escape this fate by building giant arks in the Himalayas. In one shot, some animals are brought in such as giraffes and elephants.
  • November 13, 2013
    randomsurfer
    Comic Strips: Boner's Ark, a gag-a-day strip about Captain Boner and the various animals on his ark. (Noah had it easy - Boner's ark was on the sea for 32 years, only reaching dry land in the final strip.)
  • November 14, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    @Cave Cat. you sure you don't wanna reword the description to sound more about the general Get On The Boat plot rather than be a Whole Plot Reference that covers everything from the two every species to the flood?
  • November 15, 2013
    DAN004
    What about pointing out the things that are likely to be homaged from Noah's Ark?
  • November 16, 2013
    SharleeD
    • In Discworld, there's an Urban Legend about the founding of Ankh-Morpork that tells how a wise man foretold a Great Flood, gathered his family and hundreds of animals into a big ship, and rode it out. After a few weeks' sailing, the accumulated wastes from all the animals were filling up the vessel, so they tipped all the manure over the side, and built a city on the resulting dung-island.
  • November 18, 2013
    Snicka
  • December 5, 2013
    Kotatroper
    • Parodied in The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. The main characters are teleported to Golgafrinchan Ark Fleet Ship B. Which seems like a Ark, but is actually a trick to get its inhabitants off the planet.
  • December 5, 2013
    Snicka
    Maybe the description should mention: "Not to be confused with Noahs Arc".
  • December 5, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    seriously? no further work in the description? i've encountered deconstructions of this where people fight among each other because only a select few are allowed in the ark.

    this also causes trouble among the ones who made the ark, as they are faced with the moral dilemma of being the ones to choose who survives and who doesn't.

    note again that the ark doesn't even need to be around. just the fact that people want to board it is this trope.
  • December 5, 2013
    DAN004
    Maybe you'd like to ask Cave Cat to edit it.
  • December 6, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    already tried subtlely informing him before to work on his trope by asking him if he forgot about it and told him about the MTD bandwagon. and his response was... "I haven't forgotten about it". o_o
  • December 6, 2013
    DAN004
    ^ Um, sir, it's a she, not he. :P
  • December 6, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    ^ Do I look like I give a damn, Monseigneur-dono?
  • December 7, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    i put several examples from The Ark up in the description. they all use the plot. but the Dragon Ball and TTGL examples need to be rewritten to describe the plot rather than the vessel.
  • December 9, 2013
    Tuckerscreator
    • Joked about in Holes. The kids see a cloud in the sky, the first they've ever seen in this arid desert, and start joking about how they need to start building an ark. It's all just to get their hopes up, as Camp Green Lake hasn't had rain for a hundred years.
  • December 11, 2013
    robinjohnson
    The same pun can be made less clumsily with Story Ark.
  • December 11, 2013
    DAN004
    ^ We need Noah in the title, though.
  • December 13, 2013
    robinjohnson
    ^ Why? "The Ark" is evocative of Noah on its own (and it's the ark, not Noah, that's generally being used.)
  • December 13, 2013
    DAN004
    ^ I know, but it's about the biblical story of Noah (and his arks) rather than the ark itself (which is covered by The Ark).
  • December 18, 2013
    Patachou
        Comics 
    • Nero: In the story "The Ark Of Nero" Nero builds an ark and even has lots of animals imported to bring along with him. Everyone says he's crazy, but as it turns out the tide does come. In the end it was all a dream.
    • A The Simpsons comic strip story did this too.

  • December 18, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    ^ Zero Context Example on The Simpsons. "X did it too" is not context.
  • December 20, 2013
    Snicka
  • December 20, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    ^ yeah, because everyone's seen every episode of the Simpsons at one point of their lives.
  • December 24, 2013
    Chabal2
    Just A Pilgrim: the role of the ark is taken by a space shuttle containing genetic sequences of thousands of animals so life can be started elsewhere, as the planet is now under the control of sentient mind-controlling jellyfish.
  • December 25, 2013
    Arivne
    Film
    • Sky Captain And The World Of Tomorrow. Dr. Totenkopf believed that Earth was doomed due to the destructive nature of humanity, so he built a rocket ship to carry two of every animal on Earth (and genetically engineered humans) to another planet. He intended them to create a technological utopia there.
  • December 25, 2013
    Stratadrake
    If we're going to make a pun on Story Arc, then let's spell it Noahs Story Arc or just plain Noahs Arc. (Wait, scratch that last one.)
  • December 25, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    ^ haha, been there done that (see above). Noahs Arc i mean. quite strange for it to be about homosexuals.
  • December 25, 2013
    randomsurfer
    • When Worlds Collide (Literature and Film versions): a pair of rogue planets are on a direct path to hit Earth. Scientists and governments rush to make a pair of rocket ships to hold the best of the best (and supplies) to send to another planet so humanity won't be extinguished.
    • In a Simpsons Treehouse Of Horror episode spoofing Y 2 K, after Homer's blunder destroys all electronics on Earth the US govenerment sends two rockets off: one with the best of the best (Lisa is invited) and one which Homer & Bart sneak on to which is aimed directly at the sun.
  • December 30, 2013
    Snicka
    ^^^ I agree that the spelling "Noah's Story Arc" keeps the pun better than the current name.

    The Unsorted examples need to be sorted by media type. Also, Evan Almighty is listed twice (both at Film and at Unsorted).
  • January 12, 2014
    Generality
    We still have to figure out the difference between this and The Ark. At the moment, the two have 90% identical examples, making them redundant. We need to restrict one or the other in some way.
  • January 12, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    ^ You cannot have Noahs Story Arc without referencing an Ark in some way even if you don't actually feature it in the work. likewise, The Ark gets identical examples because most plots do include the actual ark, only a few just refer to the plot itself. also, The Ark attempts to be a lumped version of this and works that have an Ark.

    I already PM'ed Cave Cat about this before and she worked on the description, but for some reason she now did what you see here: a very short description.
  • January 13, 2014
    DAN004
    ^^ This trope is a subtrope.
  • January 13, 2014
    CaveCat
    ^^The only reason I shortened the description was because I was told that it was a bad form of Example As A Thesis.
  • January 20, 2014
    DennisDunjinman
    I believe there was at least one Animaniacs sketch that went like this. Buster and Babs walked up and stated they were no relation, so the Warners let them on.

    There was another Simpsons example I can think of; I believe Homer sued the Church and started living in it, but then in his blasphemy a flood started and Flanders decided to do the Noah's Ark thing on a car-driven speedboat, but said he only brought two of every ''male'' animal to prevent them from actually mating.
  • January 24, 2014
    Snicka
    ^ Yes, there was an Animaniacs sketch like that, called "Noah's Lark". You can view it here. It didn't feature the Warners, but the Hip Hippos.
  • January 27, 2014
    randomsurfer
    Fantasia 2000 has a segment where Donald Duck is a deckhand on Noah's ark responsible for getting the animals onboard, including two non-antrhopomorphic ducks.
  • January 28, 2014
    Snicka
    There seems to be a little confusion about the Animaniacs example, so let me clear it up. It was Noah who let both Babs and Buster Bunny and the Hip Hippos on the Ark.
  • January 29, 2014
    AliceMacher
    Newspaper Comics
    • In Jules Feiffer's satirical "The Deluge," an installment of his Feiffer comic strip for the Village Voice, an angel instructs U.S. civil servant Harvey Noah to build an ark. Instead of doing so himself, he takes the matter to his supervisor. This starts a bureaucratic chain of events which culminates in the ark housing only selected members of Congress. As it starts to rain, Harvey attempts to board the vessel, only to be told he's not on the list.
  • February 2, 2014
    DAN004
    Launch?
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