Created By: NoirGrimoirJanuary 15, 2012 Last Edited By: NoirGrimoirNovember 3, 2015
Troped

Witch Classic

A type of magic user traditionally known for keeping cats, riding broom sticks and wearing pointy hats.

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Trope
While the term witch itself is often applied as a catch-all word for female magic users in fiction, the Witch as it has evolved out of Western traditions and folklore, has a number of distinct trappings and tropes.

  • Traditional Witchy Attire: Black medieval or colonial period dresses and a pointy hat, also black, are the most traditional, but not every witch buys into the uniform. Often they dress normally, especially if the want to blend in, and the traditional clothing only comes out for spell casting or ceremonies. The Hot Witch especially tends to dress more wildly while the Wicked Witch is almost always traditionally attired. Goth clothing is also associated with classic witches, as is the New Age Retro Hippie's typical style of flowy garments.
  • Broomsticks as a Transportation Method: Witches are known for riding Flying Broomsticks. In works with low amounts of fantasy, this may be omitted, but broomstick flying is something that is relatively unique to witches and not strongly associated with other types of magic users.
  • Animal Companions: Witches are often seen around animals, especially nocturnal ones, although cats are the most common by far, especially black ones. The animal is usually a Familiar that aids in spells in some way or is sometimes magic in their own right. The animals being able to communicate with their owners through telepathy, or just being able to speak to all humans, is common. When a Witch doesn't have a cat, other animals they might have include owls, crows, toads and mice.
  • Association with Nature and the Earth: Witches are often portrayed as very knowledgeable in the workings of nature, especially plants and weather. Whereas a Wizard Classic will have his head in the clouds, always watching the stars, a witch will be Closer To Earth watching the seasons turn and advising people when to plant their crops. It's common for witches to live alone in the woods, and to be a Nature Lover and Outdoorsy Gal. A witch probably has a Green Thumb too, so she can grow herbs for her magic potions, or just to scent her home-made soaps.
  • Witchcraft: Witches practice witchcraft specifically as their type of magic, which, because of the above aspect, is usually strongly tied to nature and may resemble European pagan-like traditions. Commonly their magic employs the use of herbs and strange ingredients like "Eye Of Newt" bubbling away in cauldrons, as well as night ceremonies under the moon. Usually a witch has a Spell Book, perhaps passed down through the family. In Modern media, Witchcraft is strongly associated with Hollywood versions of Real Life religions of Wicca and other forms of Neo Paganism note  although in the past they were associated with many forms of local folk traditions. Witches usually belong to 'covens'a group of witches who practice together and share knowledge and resources and often get together to cast more powerful spells. Witches do not usually use a Magic Wand or Magic Staff, those items are more commonly associated with Wizards and Sorcerers.
  • Associated with Femininity and Sistership: Witches are associated with femininity and sistership, despite the fact that traditionally and even in most media, witches are not Always Female. For male witches to be possible is common, though in-universe they are often considered rarer than female witches, and in truth most witch characters in media are female, like the classic image. If male witches do not share the term 'witch', they are sometimes called 'warlocks'. Witches also tend to have sisters, for whatever reason, and they have a strong tradition of passing their magic down from mother to daughter.
  • Associated with the number 3: For whatever reason, Witches are often seen in threes and involve three in their magic or worship. If a witch has sisters, she's probably part of a trio of siblings. A coven also usually has at least three members, or do magic in groups of three. This is most likely related to the concepts of The Three Faces Of Eve and The Hecate Sisters, two tropes that link the number three with both women and divinity.

In early western tradition, the Witch was predominantly an evil figure. Often they were associated with pagan religion and traditions or outright devil worship (which to the predominantly Christian Europe, generally amounted to the same thing), but this particular portrayal of the evil witch, known nowadays as a Wicked Witch, was most likely invented by witch hunters and targeted against the weakest sections of the populace, such as old women, who were unable to field an effective legal defense.

In modern media, witches tend to be more neutral or outright good figures. Media that has both often has a Good Witch Versus Bad Witch dynamic. Usually good witches are pretty and bad witches are very ugly, though when an evil witch is beautiful, she's usually a Vain Sorceress. Witches are often shown in contrast to a Wizard Classic, sometimes being rivals or outright enemies, or just often having differences in opinion.

A Witch shown in a modern setting, in genres such as Urban Fantasy, tend to forgo a lot of the traditional associations and tropes tied to the Witch, such as the attire and the broom riding, the character often seeing it as "too traditional". A common modern variation is for the witch to ride a vacuum cleaner as a joke. They usually acknowledge they are descendant from, or taught by witches in the European Tradition.

Subtropes of Witch Classic include:

Other tropes related to witches:

Compare to other Always Female magic users, such as the White Magician Girl, Black Magician Girl, Lady Of Black Magic, Solitary Sorceress and Vain Sorceress.

While a Witch Doctor also practices magic, they have nothing to do with the Classic Witch. Also, while sometimes witches are a Witch Species, this is not always, or often the case.

Examples:

Anime And Manga
  • Blair the Cat in Soul Eater fits into this, although she's technically a cat with strong magic (and thus the ability to shapeshift into a Cat Girl form). Angela (a child witch) is the only other non-antagonistic witch in the series who wears black. The rest of the witches are either a Wicked Witch (and wear the standard outfit, but modified with an Animal Motif and different colours) or avert the trope entirely (particularly Kim, although her non-witch partner just happens to have a flying broom form).
  • In Kikis Delivery Service, the titular Kiki is a witch-in-training. She doesn't wear the pointed hat but does wear a black dress, rides on a broomstick and has a black cat who she can speak to through magic. Her mother does magic with potions but other witches do things like fortune telling. Witches go on a journey to live along for a year as part of their training, and leaving on a full moon is the best night.
  • Witches in Rosario To Vampire are a species of "monsters" despite looking like humans, and conform to the traditional Witch stereotypes, including the pointed hat, cape, broomstick-riding, use wands with pentagrams on them. What breaks the traditional mold, though, is that men are members of this species as well, and they have hats, capes, and the works.
  • The witches of Little Witch Academia, who wear the pointy hats, ride brooms, wear black (or purple) dresses and brew potions. The protagonist is also a part of a trio of friends (who are also witches), and the main witch antagonist is also in a group of three, with two witchy minions.
  • Flying Witch is a Slice Of Life Urban Fantasy in which the main character is a young witch who goes to live with her cousins (normals) in a rural town. She has a cat familiar only she can understand, rides a broom, wears black robes on witch holidays, and plants a garden. She also takes on her younger (female) cousin as an apprentice. Other characters who uphold witch traditions (including her sister) also drop in from time to time.

Film
  • The Wicked Witch of the West from The Wizard Of Oz, is a very famous version of a classic witch. She wears black, rides a broom, has the pointy hat and has a sister.
  • The three witch sisters from Hocus Pocus, complete with sister, brooms, colonial dresses and Eyeof Newt. They are traditional Wicked Witch versions.
  • In Practical Magic all the main characters, including the very traditional New Age Retro Hippie aunts as well as the younger heroines. Brooms and potions are both used in magic in the film and they even wear the traditional clothes during Halloween.

Literature
  • Witches in Discworld. The pointy hats are very important, since a lot of being a witch is based on everyone else seeing you as a witch. The black clothes seem to be mostly because witches are practical and black is hard-wearing. Nanny Ogg and more recently Granny Weatherwax have cats. Broomsticks are generally only used by witches, even though they're made by dwarfs and can be flown by anyone, even without magical talent. One difference from the standard version is that although witches are Always Female, and Discworld magic is hereditary, witchcraft isn't passed down from mother to daughter here, it being considered that young witches should learn from another witch with a different way of doing things to prevent a family's magical style from coiling in on itself.
  • Meg, from Jan Pienkowski's Meg and Mog series.
  • Minerva McGonagall from the Harry Potter Film-verse (although the book universe could possibly count). She was seen on the Quidditch Plaque in Philosopher's Stone, which meant she must've had skill with a broomstick, not to mention she turns into a cat, and her image is never complete without her hat.
  • Many characters in the Dorrie The Witch books fit this, including Dorrie herself and her mother.
  • Blackadder referenced this trope a few times, with three witches who are based of the Macbeth ones in the first series, and a "Wise Woman" in the second.

Live Action TV
  • Witchiepoo in Sid And Marty Krofft Productions' HR Pufnstuf is this turned Up To Eleven. She's got all the traditional traits including hat and broom riding as well as the Wicked Witch ones like a tendancy to mess up a child's day.
  • The titular Sabrina The Teenage Witch, who had a black cat who was a former warlock, but other than that was rather devoid of most witchy tropes. Her aunts on the other hand, play it pretty straight, being sisters with the flowy gypsy-like clothes and the occasional potion brewing.
  • Hanna Barbera produced the opening animation for Bewitched in which Samantha Stevens wears the conical hat and dark cape, and rides a broom sidesaddle. Since Samantha herself usually averts this, the opening clues in the audience from get-go that she's a practicing witch, masquerading as a suburban housewife.
    • Samantha usually averts this, but in one Halloween episode Endora turns Darrin into a Witch Classic to teach him a lesson about tolerance. However, he volunteers to be the chaperon for his daughter's class's trick-or-treat outing, and he garners rave reviews for his perfect witch costume.
  • In an episode of Big Time Rush, Camille auditions for a movie about witches impersonating one of these. A case of Wrong Genre Savvy since the producers weren't looking for witch classic and rather by more contemporary hot witches.

Theater
  • The witches in Shakespeare's Macbeth. They cackle, rhyme, and have a cauldron full of nasty stuff.

Video Games
  • Tessa would seem to be a modern update of this trope (if not, she comes close). Her robes are white and a bit more festive and revealing than your traditional witch, not to mention that she uses a magic wand, but she has the trademark pointed hat (which appears to be alive in some depictions), owns four cats (two of which—Al and Ivan—actually aid her in battle), is often shown thumbing through what is presumably her spell book, and is seen riding on a broomstick during Pocket Fighter/Super Gem Fighter: Mini-Mix. The only difference is that she refers to herself as a sorcerologist, one who employs magic in her studies to discern the nature of the universe, and as such, Tessa's brand of witchcraft seems to be a mix of classical cauldron brewing and alchemy.
  • Except for the lack of a cat, Touhou's Marisa Kirisame is an example in both the modern Windows games and the, appearance wise, completely different, PC-9801 era Marisa.
  • The witches from Castlevania Aria Of Sorrow and Castlevania Dawn Of Sorrow. They are actually a staple of the Castlevania series.
  • Gruntilda "Grunty" Winkybunion, the primary antagonist of the Banjo Kazooie series plays this trope straight full-on. She wears black clothes and a pointy hat, rides a broomstick, uses magic as her primary method of attack, has three sisters (one of whom is a Fairy Godmother), talks in rhyme (except in Banjo-Tooie at the request of an annoyed Mingella and Blobbelda), and owns a cat named Piddles in Banjo-Kazooie: Nuts and Bolts.

Western Animation
  • Witch Hazel from Looney Tunes.
    • Disney also had a Witch Hazel in the Donald Duck short "Trick or Treat". The only thing the two have in common, beside the name, is that they're both voiced by June Foray.
  • Hanna Barbera's Winnie Witch, who is a lot like the Witch Hazels above.
  • A witch riding a broom and giddy with martinis drops her magic wand in the Pink Panther cartoon "Pink-A-Rella." Pink finds the wand and uses it to transform an impoverished girl into a dazzling debutante so that she can meet her idol, Pelvis Parsley. The boozy witch returns to confront Pink about reclaiming her wand. This cartoon was directed by Friz Freleng.
  • The Tom And Jerry cartoon "The Flying Sorceress" has a classic witch with almost every feature: conical hat with wide brim, flying broom, witchcraft, wicked cackle, haunted house ... missing only the feline familiar. Tom Cat arrives at her home to apply for the position of cat companion.
Community Feedback Replies: 67
  • January 15, 2012
    NESBoy
    Green skin. Don't forget about the green skin.
  • January 15, 2012
    Bisected8
    • Blair the Cat in Soul Eater fits into this, although she's technically a cat with strong magic (and thus the ability to shapeshift into a Cat Girl form). Angela (a child witch) is the only other non-antagonistic witch in the series who wears black. The rest of the witches are either a Wicked Witch (and wear the standard outfit, but modified with an Animal Motif and different colours) or avert the trope entirely (particularly Kim, although her non-witch partner just happens to have a flying broom form).
  • January 15, 2012
    X2X
    ^^ But isn't that more commonly associated with the Wicked Witch archetype? It probably evolved from the classical depiction of witches (as did several other witch tropes listed above), it's sort of its own thing nowadays.

    Video Games
    • Tessa would seem to be a modern update of this trope (if not, she comes close). Her robes are white and a bit more festive and revealing than your traditional witch, not to mention that she uses a magic wand, but she has the trademark pointed hat (which appears to be alive in some depictions), owns four cats (two of which--Al and Ivan--actually aid her in battle), is often shown thumbing through what is presumably her spell book, and is seen riding on a broomstick during Pocket Fighter/Super Gem Fighter: Mini-Mix. The only difference is that she refers to herself as a sorcerologist, one who employs magic in her studies to discern the nature of the universe, and as such, Tessa's brand of witchcraft seems to be a mix of classical cauldron brewing and alchemy.
  • January 16, 2012
    TonyG
    • The Wicked Witch of the West from The Wizard Of Oz.
    • Witch Hazel from Looney Tunes.
      • Disney also had a Witch Hazel in the Donald Duck short "Trick or Treat". The only thing the two have in common, beside the name, is that they're both voiced by June Foray.
  • January 16, 2012
    DaibhidC
    • Witches in Discworld. The pointy hats are very important, since a lot of being a witch is based on everyone else seeing you as a witch. The black clothes seem to be mostly because witches are practical and black is hard-wearing. Nanny Ogg and more recently Granny Weatherwax have cats. Broomsticks are generally only used by witches, even though they're made by dwarfs and can be flown by anyone, even without magical talent. One difference from the standard version is that although witches are Always Female, and Discworld magic is hereditary, witchcraft isn't passed down from mother to daughter here, it being considered that young witches should learn from another witch with a different way of doing things to prevent a family's magical style from coiling in on itself.
  • January 16, 2012
    randomsurfer
    Hanna Barbera's Winnie Witch, who is a lot like the Witch Hazels above.
  • January 16, 2012
    deuxhero
    Except for the lack of a cat, Touhou's Marisa Kirisame is an example in both the modern Windows games and the, appearance wise, completely different, PC-9801 era Marisa.
  • January 17, 2012
    PaulA
    • Meg, from Jan Pienkowski's Meg and Mog series.
  • January 17, 2012
    Duncan
    The gang from Hocus Pocus.
  • January 17, 2012
    DracMonster
    Um, doesn't Wicked Witch already cover all this?

    If this is just "Wicked Witch without the wicked part" it may be The Same But More Specific territory. (Being automatically evil is part of the classic witch image.)

    EDIT: Changed my mind after some thought. It might be better to rewrite Wicked Witch as "Classic Witch plus evil parts." Write this description to include the imagery which isn't Obviously Evil (like green skin) then point the reader to Wicked Witch for those.
  • January 17, 2012
    NoirGrimoir
    I really don't think green skin is a big part of witches. I can't think of a single one aside from the witch in The Wizard Of Oz. Wicked Witch is a subtrope of this. The Wicked Witch could do with some improvement in the description but as tropes I think they are fine.
  • January 17, 2012
    PaulA
    ^ I can think of other examples, but they're all paying homage to The Wizard of Oz, so that doesn't really weaken your point.
  • January 18, 2012
    Frank75
    More than one work has parodied the broomstick bit with witches in modern times who use a vacuum cleaner instead.
  • January 18, 2012
    Mozgwsloiku
    And cackling. Don't forget cackling.
  • January 21, 2012
    Prfnoff
    I think it would be better to not have Wicked Witch as a subtrope of this, and redo the definition of that trope to make that less about the stereotypical image.
  • January 21, 2012
    NoirGrimoir
    I can't 'not' have it a subtrope. It's about witches! Wicked Witch is a type of witch. Particularly an evil witch.
  • January 22, 2012
    PaulA
    ^ But not every Wicked Witch wears traditional witchy attire and rides around on a broomstick with her cat familiar.
  • January 23, 2012
    azul120
  • January 28, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    ^ They are actually a staple of the Castlevania series.
  • January 28, 2012
    githyan
    seems to be in a similar vein to the above "wizard classic." looks good!
  • January 28, 2012
    nman
    • Witches in Rosario To Vampire are a species of "monsters" despite looking like humans, and conform to the traditional Witch stereotypes, including the pointed hat, cape, broomstick-riding, use wands with pentagrams on them. What breaks the traditional mold, though, is that men are members of this species as well, and they have hats, capes, and the works.
  • January 30, 2012
    DracMonster
    @Paul A: This is a Super Trope. It's going to have the common imagery that's used, but any depiction can have exceptions, as long as it conform to most of it. In my mind "Evil" is part of the standard imagery (calling a girl a witch is never a compliment,) but non-evil has become so common that I think that Wicked Witch can be left as sub-trope.

    Just because something's a stereotype (even a bad stereotype) doesn't mean it isn't a trope. (Anyway, that article does go into some of the Unfortunate Implications and Double Standard.)

    @Noir Grimoir: Since this is becoming a Super Trope, you could just call it Witch.
  • January 30, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    In that case, would Wicked Witch cover the standard style?
  • January 30, 2012
    DracMonster
    It does, I had brought that up, the thing is, it's become so rare it's almost a Plot Twist when one is actually evil. (I said standard but I meant "used to be standard".) I think it's basically slid from overtrope to subtrope is what I was trying to say.
  • January 30, 2012
    Rytex
    I would like to point out Professor Minerva Mc Gonagall from the Harry Potter Film-verse (although the book universe could possibly count). She was seen on the Quidditch Plaque in Philosopher's Stone, which meant she must've had skill with a broomstick, not to mention she turns into a cat, and her image is never complete without her hat.
  • March 14, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    • Many characters in the Dorrie The Witch books fit this, including Dorrie herself and her mother.

    Have a ykttw for that work, in case anyone's worried about the red link.
  • March 18, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    ^ Now it's launched.

    As for this trope, what is to be done?
  • March 19, 2012
    HeartOfAnAstronaut
    The witches in Macbeth. They cackle, rhyme, and have a cauldron full of nasty stuff.

    Blackadder also referenced this trope a few times, with three witches who are based of the Macbeth ones in the first series, and a "Wise Woman" in the second.
  • March 19, 2012
    JonnyB
  • August 6, 2012
    Koveras
    I still think Witch Classic was a good wikiword for this...
  • August 6, 2012
    LordGro
    I think this is insufficiently different from Wicked Witch. Especially the cat, flying broomsticks and "witchy attire" are part of the Wicked Witch stereotype, or "Witch Classic" if you want to drop the "wicked" part.

    About the definition of "witch" plain and simple, there's two things to consider:
    • The witches of European folk belief -- those hunted during the European Witch Hunts -- were not actually Wicked Witches per se, as "witches" could be of any age and of any appearance. Broomsticks were only one of their various possible means of locomotion, and they weren't all female -- men could be witches too, even if women were thought to be witches more often (because women were thought to be more susceptible to the devil, or something in that vein). The Wicked Witch is an stereotype that began with fairy tales ("Hansel And Gretel") and was codified by children's books from a time when nobody took "witches" seriously any more.
    • The concept of "witch" is not exclusive to Western/Christian culture. Belief in malicious sorcerers, male or female, was and is extremely widespread. It existed in Europe before it became Christian and it exists (and has existed as long as anybody can remember) elsewhere. Australian Aborigines believed in sorcerers too, for example.

    Under the name "Witch", I'd expect one of the following definitions:
    • A synonym for Evil Sorcerer (male or female) - the oldest definition.
    • A evil sorceress (female only) - a more recent definition.
    • A female magic user -- the youngest definition that appears mostly in modern fantasy literature, having liberated witches from the stigma of always being evil.
  • August 6, 2012
    acrobox
    -
  • August 6, 2012
    acrobox
    the list of attributes is covered by Wicked Witch and the description is very similar to Witch Species I might just go in and edit one of those rather than make a new witch trope.
  • August 7, 2012
    NoirGrimoir
    ^Did you even read beyond the first sentence of Witch Species? That's a totally different thing that only vaguely has to do with actual witches.

    I think the best thing is to make this the 'witch trope' and then redo the Wicked Witch description (not definition, just description) to specify that Wicked Witches will have all the classic traits and a few more like stereotypical cackling, ugliness or age, warts, a particular hatred of children, creepy or malicious pets and evilness, and that the 'wicked witch' trope mostly came out of fairy tales, where the wicked witch was a stock villain, aimed at giving moral and practical lessons to children (hence usually liking to steal/eat children and such). Also that nowadays most wicked witches are based on the Wicked Witch Of The West from Wizard Of OZ, as witches in fiction are hardly ever evil anymore.
  • August 7, 2012
    lexicon
    The film examples and some others need context.
  • August 7, 2012
    lexicon
    Unfortunately I don't think this works for a trope. It would essentially be used to discribe every character called a witch. A sorceress or enchantress wouldn't use the classic traites of the Wiched Witch, Witch Species, and Widow Witch. A Princess Classic on the other hand wouldn't be used for just someone with the title of princess.
  • August 7, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    ^ Well Everythings Better With Princesses covers just about any princess in a work (just some assume things need to be better as part of the trope).
  • August 7, 2012
    elwoz
    A long time ago I tried to YKTTW "Village Witch" which was essentially this except that Wicked Witch was excluded from the definition. I then didn't have time to flesh it out and it fell off the bottom, but I still think we ought to have something of the sort.
  • August 7, 2012
    NoirGrimoir
    A 'witch' is as much a stock character as a 'wizard' (which has a trope) or 'elves'. Being able to list every single witch is perfectly acceptable. Knowing a character is a witch tells you things about them that the text won't otherwise tell you.
  • August 7, 2012
    lexicon
    Everythings Better With Princesses is too vague to be a trope too. So you could just call this The Witch?
  • August 7, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    ^ You have to prove that on the forums. Until then, you can't use a personal opinion of a trope, that others find valid, to try to invalidate a ykttw.
  • January 25, 2014
    NoirGrimoir
    I want to revive this, I think it's a needed and useful trope. If anyone wants to edit it or make suggestions, feel free. I think 'Wicked Witch' should be exclusively for evil versions of witches, this being the umbrella trope for all witch-type characters. There are plenty of witch characters who don't fall into one of the existing witch tropes, but share qualities with many of them, including costume and personality. I think this needs some more revision and information but I don't think it is an idea that should be discarded. Input on what should be done would be appreciated. I will write up an example description of what the Wicked Witch page would become once this trope is passed after we have some more input so that a determination can be made about how necessary having both tropes is.
  • January 25, 2014
    DAN004
    We also have Hot Witch, Cute Witch etc. Not sure why Wicked Witch is "classic".
  • July 21, 2014
    gilbmj
    I agree, if Wicked Witch covers most of what Witch Classic is intended to cover, it's a problem with Wicked Witch being outdated in respect to the fact that a woman riding a broom while wearing black with a matching cat isn't reliably a villainous character.
  • July 21, 2014
    DAN004
    So this isn't "classic" so much as "generic". Because classically, witches ARE wicked. Amirite?
  • July 21, 2014
    lexicon
    Right, classically witches are wicked. I had forgotten about this. If you want a traditional witch that isn't wicked you could call it "Gothic Witch".
  • July 21, 2014
    DAN004
    Maybe call it Witch Style.
  • August 16, 2014
    gilbmj
    I'm now of the opinion that the intended topic is essentially a Witch Supertrope to all the other variants of "witch." Housing the thematic trappings of witches in general under Wicked Witch seems outdated, I think I see a lot more Cute Witch these days.
  • August 16, 2014
    Generality
    I think fundamentally this is Wicked Witch, except that the wicked part is diminishing over time. Certainly the most "classic" depiction of a witch is the Wicked Witch, with any variations now common being modern additions. I can see this being useful as a supertrope, but it's worth mentioning that the portrayal of witches on a moral compass shifts over time.
  • August 16, 2014
    FlyingDuckManGenesis
    Video Games
    • Gruntilda "Grunty" Winkybunion, the primary antagonist of the Banjo Kazooie series plays this trope straight full-on. She wears black clothes and a pointy hat, rides a broomstick, uses magic as her primary method of attack, has three sisters (one of whom is a Fairy Godmother), talks in rhyme (except in Banjo-Tooie at the request of an annoyed Mingella and Blobbelda), and owns a cat named Piddles in Banjo-Kazooie: Nuts and Bolts.
  • August 16, 2014
    DAN004
    Well, is somebody managing this?
  • August 16, 2014
    oneuglybunny
    Western Animation
    • A witch riding a broom and giddy with martinis drops her magic wand in the Pink Panther cartoon "Pink-A-Rella." Pink finds the wand and uses it to transform an impoverished girl into a dazzling debutante so that she can meet her idol, Pelvis Parsley. The boozy witch returns to confront Pink about reclaiming her wand. This cartoon was directed by Friz Freleng.
  • August 17, 2014
    JujuP
    It should have been added that, in Harry Potter, as part of Early Installment Weirdness, the Hogwarts uniform was the Witch Classic (dresses and pointed hats)
  • September 23, 2014
    Pichu-kun
  • September 23, 2014
    DAN004
    Again, call it Witch Style.
  • September 24, 2014
    Spindriver
    There's probably a family of "witch" tropes, and one thing that jumped out at me as wrong about this one was "Originally the Witch was an evil figure that either practiced pagan religion or traditions..." The idea that European witchcraft was a survival of pre-Christian paganism is not proven, to put it politely, and should probably be blamed on Margaret Murray.

    Which suggests another trope for the family, alongside "Cute/Sexy Witch" for when you've basically got the classic costume and some of the habits hung on a curvy babe; "Pagan/New Age Witch", for characters drawing on the witch-cult hypothesis. Usually either benevolent or kind of a neutral nature-worshiper, downplays some of the classic features, tends to floaty dresses. Magrat Garlick as the comedy version, Willow Rosenberg and friends as the low-key modern dramatic version.
  • October 29, 2015
    NoirGrimoir
    ^New Age Witch is a great subtrope. Also I'll update the description a bit to incorporate that information.

    I want to get this one going again. You guys are right, this is basically a "Witch Super Trope".

    I am not calling it Witch Style, sorry but that makes no sense to me, but I'm open to other names. Gothic Witch seems like it would be mistaken for A Goth Is A Witch or something similar.
  • October 29, 2015
    DAN004
    Maybe call it Standard Witch Attire?
  • October 29, 2015
    Generality
    ^^ The earliest version of what we might call the classic witch archetype is the Wicked Witch, which is not particularly based on any real activity. It was mostly invented by witch hunters and targeted against the weakest sections of the populace who were unable to field an effective legal defense, especially old women. Most of the witch tropes developed as a result of these prejudices. (things like broomsticks, cats and black clothing were things that practically everyone had, but it could be easy to cast them in a suspicious light, especially if eyewitnesses could be found who would claim they had seen them used in an unusual fashion)

    Witchcraft, i.e. folk superstitious practice, certainly pre-existed the medieval witch hunts, and doesn't conform to any typical witch tropes except insofar as some portion of practitioners were old women, possibly a significant proportion. Some of them were probably pagans, especially in areas that polytheism once held heavy sway, such as the British Isles and Scandinavia, in that they essentially hearkened back to ancient traditions of superstition that had been inherited through the culture. Whether they could be considered pagans in the modern sense is a matter of perspective, as they would likely have followed Christian practices as well.
  • October 29, 2015
    NoirGrimoir
    ^^It's not just about clothing bro.

    ^I think that's better for analysis, it's a lot to put on the main page.

    Also, I sandboxed a new description for Wicked Witch here: Wicked Witch. I know that's usually a trope repair shop thing, but it's not like I redefined anything, just made it more descriptive and less lame, and also TRS doesn't want anythign new they won't ever get done. If this gets launched I'll just swap the descriptions out.
  • October 31, 2015
    oneuglybunny
    Western Animation
    • The Tom And Jerry cartoon "The Flying Sorceress" has a classic witch with almost every feature: conical hat with wide brim, flying broom, witchcraft, wicked cackle, haunted house ... missing only the feline familiar. Tom Cat arrives at her home to apply for the position of cat companion.
  • November 1, 2015
    Generality
    By the way, Solitary Sorceress is one of the typical subtropes: The standard witch will live in a shack in the woods.
  • November 1, 2015
    NoirGrimoir
    ^Thanks, I added it as a 'compare' trope since Solitary Sorceress isn't always a witch.
  • November 2, 2015
    randomsurfer
    Bewitched usually averts this, but in one Halloween episode Endora turns Darrin into a Witch Classic to teach him a lesson about tolerance. However, he volunteers to be the chaperone for his daughter's class's trick-or-treat outing, and he garners rave reviews for his perfect witch costume.
  • November 2, 2015
    oneuglybunny
    ^ Let me add to that, in that Hanna Barbera produced the opening animation for Bewitched in which Samantha Stevens wears the conical hat and dark cape, and rides a broom sidesaddle. This clues the audience from get-go that she's a practicing witch, masquerading as a suburban housewife.
  • November 3, 2015
    GiorgioDaneri
    • In an episode of Big Time Rush, Camille auditions for a movie about witches impersonating one of these. A case of Wrong Genre Savvy since the producers weren't looking for witch classic and rather by more contemporary hot witches.
  • November 3, 2015
    NoirGrimoir
    I'll probably launch this Wednesday.

Three days must pass before this YKTTW is Launchworthy or Discardable