Created By: XFllo on January 2, 2013 Last Edited By: XFllo on March 17, 2013
Troped

Coordinated Clothes

Characters intentionally wear the same clothes to show that they belong together

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Trope

Aw, look, the characters, be they twins, a couple in love, loving family members or a group of friends, intentionally wear matching clothes to show that they belong together. The outfits might be exactly the same, or just similar and matching in style. It's usually seen as cute, cool, creepy or just lame.

Coordinated Clothes will be often employed with Twin Tropes, especially Always Identical Twins to emphasize the identical look. Sickeningly Sweethearts like to choose matching outfits for fancy occasions or costume parties to make it clear that they are together. It can be a trait of Those Two Guys or Heterosexual Life-Partners. Sometimes a group of friends and a posse might coordinate their clothes as well.

A variation occurs as a part of Irritation Is the Sincerest Form of Flattery when a character tries to imitate somebody they look up to. Copying their clothes is the easiest thing to do. The person whose appearance is copied might welcome it as proper attention, but individuality and uniqueness is a valued thing, so the role model might get annoyed very soon.

This trope originates in wearing uniforms. Uniforms and sports shirts are worn to show that all the people wearing them form a strong group, and they build morale and encourage unity. However, wearing uniforms is enforced. This trope happens only when characters willingly wear the same clothes to show that they belong together, or when somebody willingly tries to copy their role model.

Contrast with Dresses the Same, which is wearing the same clothes by accident and considered embarrassing, especially by ladies.

Compare with Whole Costume Reference, which is a Shout-Out given by wearing an identical outfit that was famously worn by another character or Real Life person.

Examples:

Film
  • Stanley Kubrick's The Shining: The creepy sisters wear the same light blue dresses with pink ribbons. The identical look multiplies the creep out factor.
  • The twins wear matching outfits several times in The Parent Trap remake, sometimes to confuse the others about which twin is which. When the mother sees both her daughters for the first time since their separation, each is dressed in yellow and white. She tells them not to do this to her because she's already seeing double and asks who is who.
  • The Andys of Hot Fuzz are two inseparable detectives who, though not very good at their job, certainly dress for it.
  • Inverted in Dirty Dancing where the two main characters wear clothes of contrasting colors throughout the movie, even for their dance number where couples very often wear matching outfits.
  • In Never Been Kissed, the group of mathematical enthusiasts go to a prom in matching outfits. It makes them feel secure.

Literature
  • Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey:
    • Isabella Thorpe, a reputed beauty, tries to invoke the trope by suggesting her newest, bestest friend Catherine that they should be dressed exactly like each other because men often do take notice of that. She probably wants to invoke the beautiful twins image and attract attention. The innocent Catherine doesn't follow.
    • Isabella's younger and less attractive sisters Maria and Anne try to imitate Isabella's style and they dress like her. According to the narrator, it kind of works, but their rude brother John thinks his younger sisters are laughable and quirky.
  • Lisa and Lottie (original German title Das doppelte Lottchen -- "The double Lottie", known to many as one of its many film adaptations, e.g. The Parent Trap) by Erich Kästner: Nine-year-old girls Lisa and Lottie are twins separated as babies who accidentally meet at summer camp. Lottie brought two dresses of the same kind, and each girl wears one, complete with matching braids, for dinner. They wanted to confuse and amuse other children and their camp supervisors.

Live Action TV
  • The X-Files, "Eve": Teena and Cindy, who are creepy murderous clone girls, wear matching red hellish outfits. It was probably a case of I Just Knew because they did not grow up together, making their identical look even more disturbing.
  • How I Met Your Mother:
    • Lily and Marshall are a cute couple and very much in love. They like wearing corresponding Halloween costumes, for instance they went once as Sony and Cher (surprisingly, Marshall as Cher) or a pirate and his parrot.
    • Barney and Abby (guest starred by Britney Spears) wear matching outfits. Each wears a white T-shirt, a light blue jumper and jeans. It was Barney's idea to wear it and humiliate Ted. Its purpose was to mock Ted's quest for a perfect soul mate.
  • The Drew Carey Show:
    • A little person who works at Winfrid-Lauder looks up to Mimi and starts dressing like her to be a "Mini Mimi".
    • A man starts taking after Drew, down to dressing like him and decorating his house to look exactly like Drew's. It creeps Drew and his friends out.
  • The Big Bang Theory:
    • "The Holographic Excitation": The newly weds Howard and Bernadette are both little people (as in short and thin), so they dressed as a couple of cute smurfs for a Halloween party.
    • "The Holographic Excitation": Amy and Sheldon are going to a Halloween party and she tries to convince him to wear couple costumes. Amy wants something romantic that shows everyone that they together, while Sheldon doesn't understand the sentiment and would prefer Star Wars characters R2D2 and C3PO, or Hewlett and Packard, founders of the HP company. Their compromise is being dressed as Raggedy Ann and "Raggedy" C3PO.
    • One episode features the gang dressed up as superheroes from the Justice League of America for a New Year's Eve party in a comic book store. Too bad there were several gangs with the same idea, but Leonard and co's costumes were the coolest and they won the competition.
  • The 2012 ABC series Series The Neighbors:
    • The alien members of the gated community all dress identically. The main alien family may dress in a slight variation, but they still colour-coordinate with the community and with each other.
    • The father-and-son and mother-and-daughter have always worn matching theme Halloween costumes, but this year the son decides to go out with his new school friends as a zombie and the daughter "goes slutty" by declaring that she and a neighbor boy will go as "hot doctor and slutty nurse." Due to the fact that the neighbor boy is a Cloud Cuckoolander alien, he assumes that he is supposed to be the slutty nurse.
  • In Disney's Shake It Up, Gunther and Tinka are extravagant twins who often wear matching outfits, but not the same ones (e.g. Gunther's will sport a 'G' and Tinka's a 'T'). They are brother and sister rather than of the same gender, so Gunther's outfits are slightly creepy.
  • In the Gilmore Girls episode "Application Anxiety", Lorelai suggests to Rory that the siblings they just met are acting like they're together too much to just be brother and sister. Once they come back having changed their clothes, Lorelai notes to Rory that they're color-coordinated as further proof.
  • In Once Upon a Time, Regina and Rumplestiltskin both wore black and blue for an episode after they started a sort of Heel–Face Turn and tried to redeem themselves for their loved ones. They are still as antagonistic as ever, and end up disagreeing on the best way to carry this plan. [NEEDS CONTEXT - what is their relationship?]
  • The HBO comedy series Not Necessarily The News: There was a "sniglet" (= any word that doesn't appear in the dictionary, but should) that describes this trope; "fods" -- noun, couples at amusement parks who wear identical T-shirts.

Manga and Anime
  • In Sket Dance:
  • Detective Conan:
    • In her début scene, Kazuha is very jealous when Ran accidentally shows up in the same shirt as Heiji, and so Ran changes out of it. Kazuha and Heiji are childhood friends who claim to be Like Brother and Sister but they're really a couple who just haven't started dating yet. Kazuha thought that Ran was the person Heiji was secretly talking to over the phone and wanted to meet with in person, and she interprets the outfits as intentional.
    • Two identical necklaces are a subtle hint that another pair of characters are romantically inclined.
    • At the end of the mystery, Ran and Kazuha end up switching shirts for a Brick Joke. Ran's wearing a shirt that happens to be similar to Heiji's current outfit, so she has Kazuha wear it instead. Kazuha feels super embarrassed, but Heiji is oblivious as to the romantic implications. Conan snarks to himself that those two are more like a straight-man and funny-guy duo than a couple.

Web Original
  • The Lizzie Bennet Diaries: In episode 59 "Staff Spirit", Charlotte Lu wears a Ketchup costume for Halloween work event, while her direct supervisor Ricky Collins is dressed in a Mustard outfit.

Western Animation
  • The Simpsons:
    • Marge and Bart Simpsons and Agnes and Seymour Skinners wore matching outfits for singing in a competition where they performed as mother-son duos.
    • Twin sisters and Those Two Women Patty and Selma who are single and live together wear similar clothes and have similar hair styles.
    • Mr Burns bought matching green shirts for his bowling buddies. The guys were very moved by it, almost forgiving him that he was such a poor player.
  • In the SpongeBob SquarePants episode "Big Pink Loser", Patrick starts dressing up like SpongeBob as part of an attempt to be a winner just like him. SpongeBob finds it a little creepy, but flattering.
  • In Total Drama Island, Sadie and Katie match their outfits to represent their incredibly strong friendship.
  • On South Park, the Goths are proud of their non-conformity.
    If you wanna be one of the non-conformists, all you have to do is dress just like us and listen to the same music we do.

Real Life
  • Some twins (or their mothers) indulge in having the same outfits. Many identical twins hate being forced to dress alike, at least beyond the age that they are old enough to have a say in the matter. Some, but not all, psychologists are also opposed, saying it robs each twin of their individuality.
  • Joey and Mel Schwanke wear matching outfits for 35 years. They take this trope Up to Eleven, having 146 custom-made matching outfits, typically matching Joey's dress and Mel's tie,
  • It's a common occurence in Asia for couples to wear matching clothes. According to the article, a pair of really committed lovers can be recognized by wearing the same outfit in countries like Korea, China or Japan. Public displays of affection remain a taboo there, and matching outfits are a kind of substitute.
  • In Japan, the phenomenon of couples wearing matching clothes is referred to as bacouple. It a portmanteau word formed from "baka" (Japanese for "fool") and English "couple".

Community Feedback Replies: 80
  • January 3, 2013
    randomsurfer
    On Two And A Half Men Charlie dates a woman who is the spitting image of his mother, including dressing very similarly (same style but different color).
  • January 3, 2013
    InsanityPrelude
    I can't think of something better at this time of night, but there's got to be a better way to word that description. It looks like the characters deliberately dressing/being dressed the same is the important part more than "people have varied reactions to it."
  • January 3, 2013
    randomsurfer
    The Drew Carey Show:
    • A little person who works at Winfrid-Lauder looks up to Mimi (no pun intended) and starts dressing like her to be a "Mini Mimi."
    • A man starts taking after Drew, down to dressing like him and decorating his house to look exactly like Drew's. It creeps Drew and his friends out.
  • January 3, 2013
    XFllo
    ^^ Sure, any ideas are welcome, and I am willing to do as many rewrites as requested.

    EDIT: I included a word about the sense of "togetherness".

    another edit: I extended the description. Should I add anything else?
  • January 3, 2013
    XFllo
    @randomsurfer: I added your examples from The Drew Carey Show. They seem to be a good example of how this trope can be used "one way" as imitation and often desperate attempt to belong to somebody you like. It's intentional, and the second party doesn't usually welcome it. (I have seen this happen in real life as well.)

    The example from Two And A Half Men as you described it doesn't seem to be intentional though. I think it might rather be downplayed Dresses The Same if the ladies met each other. However, I'm not familiar with that show, so I'm not sure.
  • January 3, 2013
    TonyG
    In the Sponge Bob Square Pants episode "Big Pink Loser", Patrick starts dressing up like SpongeBob as part of an attempt to be a winner just like him. SpongeBob finds it a little creepy, but flattering.
  • January 3, 2013
    lexicon
    "Alice and Betty wear the same outfit," is People Sit On Chairs even if you tell us that they're creepy. In order for this to work there needs to be more to it. A couple of good examples are from The Parent Trap remake.

    • The mother sees both her daughters for the first time and each is dressed in yellow and white. She tells them to not do this to her because she's already seeing double and asks which is Hallie, the one who set this meeting up.

    • When it's time for them to separate they come to their parents wearing the same style of outfit and use the same mannerisms so their parents can't tell them apart. That's when the propose that the four of them go on the camping trip together and when the parents bring them back, they'll tell them who's Hallie and who's Annie.

    The twins also dress the same for the camping trip but that has no significance to it. It didn't effect anything that was said or done. The picture of this page is also a problem because it has no meaning to it.
  • January 4, 2013
    XFllo
    @ lexicon: All right, I see, everything is People Sit On Chairs. Alice and Betty intentionally wearing the same clothes is, in my humble opinion, a trope. It is also my opinion that people's reaction in-universe and viewers' reaction to that is an important part of the trope.

    @ all tropers: Feel free to suggest a better trope image.
  • January 4, 2013
    XFllo

    caption text: to be done

    Alternative trope image.

    b a r n e y

    &

    a b b y

    From How I Met Your Mother

    x

    xx

    xxx
  • January 4, 2013
    Koveras
    The title Corresponding Clothes makes me wanna ask "corresponding to what?" It's not immediately obvious to me that they correspond to each other. How about simply Matching Clothes? The alliteration is absent, but it's short, clear, and the verb "match" implicates a more intentional similarity than "correspond".
  • January 4, 2013
    XFllo
    ^ Thank you for your feedback. I indeed tried to come up with an alliterative name, but of course simplicity and conveying the idea clearly is more important.
  • January 4, 2013
    Koveras
    The priority order is Clear Concise Witty, with alliteration falling under Witty. ^^
  • January 4, 2013
    lexicon
    That's a good picture. It's not just a pair of twins whose parents dress them alike. It must have been intentional and probably took some planning.

    Matching Clothes might be a better title (unless it makes people add examples without meaning) but we could also go with Double Vision. Edit: except that's already taken. Maybe Seeing Two?

    Yes, Alice and Betty intentionally wearing the same clothes is a trope, but it needs to clearly be more then they get up in the morning and say, "So what do you want to where today?" because it's what they do just because they're twins.

    For the 'creepy' examples the question is probably, "who decided that they should be dressed matching and why"? If they chose it without any idea about the other person that would be creepy like a psychic connection. (The picture doesn't make them look hellish.) To give any example context you can also ask yourself how people reacted to seeing two people dressed the same.
  • January 4, 2013
    XFllo
    ^ Why Seeing Two would make a good name for a trope about twins, couples and groups wearing the same clothes? I don't get it.

    Also, is the answer the creator of the work decided that his/her characters will be dressed in matching clothes because it attracts attention and it's sort of expected with Creepy Twins trope good? Is that question relevant?

    The clone twin-like girls Teena and Cindy from the image from The X Files do look hellish to me because the whole episode was creepy and what the girls did there was creepy. A lot of the creepiness comes from the identical look, no? At least it works for me. If you're interested who prepared their clothes and who dressed them: Well, it's not shown, but probably the crazy Eve 7 who kidnapped them both. Or they just knew and convinced their adoptive parents (each girl had lived in a different family) to buy them exactly the same set of clothes in advance so that they could confuse or charm people in their way, including the FBI and the police, with all their girly twin allure.
  • January 4, 2013
    lexicon
    "They do look hellish to me because the whole episode was creepy and what the girls did there was creepy," is a good description of Just A Face And A Caption.
  • January 4, 2013
    XFllo
    That was not an explanation of why it is a good trope image, it was an explanation why they are Creepy Twins. Why I think it would be a good trope image is that they are clearly dressed in the same clothes and it's not by an accident.

    You may of course suggest another picture. Ideally the troper hivemind will agree on the very best one.
  • January 4, 2013
    Sandbylur
    Real Life:
  • January 5, 2013
    randomsurfer
    In the 2012 ABC series The Neighbors, the father-and-son and mother-and-daughter have always worn matching theme Halloween costumes, but this year the son decides to go out with his new school friends as a zombie and the daughter "goes slutty" by declaring that she and a neighbor boy will go as "hot doctor and slutty nurse." Due to the fact that the neighbor boy is a Cloud Cuckoolander alien, he assumes that he is supposed to be the slutty nurse.
  • January 5, 2013
    Jemada
    Disney's Shake It Up has Gunther and Tinka (a boy and a girl) always wearing matching outfits. I know they're twins, but since they're a boy and a girl as opposed to the same gender, it's creepy.
  • January 5, 2013
    flamemario12
    Wait, you can add images in YKTTW draft?
  • January 6, 2013
    XFllo
    @ flamemario12: Seems like you can:-) Only the formatting doesn't work exactly as on already existing pages. Hope it's not discouraged or anything, but it might save us one image picking discussion in the future.

    @ Jemada: I'm not familiar with Shake It Up at all. Is the example written exactly the way you would put it on the wiki? First person is not allowed, you know.

    @ all: If you think the characters' reactions and audience reactions are not part of the trope, please state your opinions in the discussion.
  • January 6, 2013
    lakingsif
    ^ In Disney's Shake It Up Gunther and Tinka are extravagant twins who often wear matching outfits, but not the same ones (e.g. Gunther's will sport a 'G' and Tinka's a 'T'). They are brother and sister rather than of the same gender, so Gunther's outfits are slightly creepy.

    Also can be a trait of Those Two Guys (e.g. the Andys of Hot Fuzz, the twins and Patty & Selma in The Simpsons etc.)
  • January 9, 2013
    Chernoskill
    • Inverted in Dirty Dancing where the two main characters wear clothes of contrasting colors throughout the movie.
  • January 11, 2013
    MokonaZero
    In Naruto the Akatsuki all wear black cloaks with red clouds on them.

    EDIT by trope sponsor: Could you please elaborate a bit as to the meaning? Are they group of some sort? Troper lexicon is right that some examples are missing context.

    re: edit: They basically explain that their apart of the organization. Only they wear those outfits.
  • January 11, 2013
    XFllo
    How about Coordinated Clothes as a name?
  • January 12, 2013
    WeAreAllKosh
    Live-Action TV

    One of Michael Westen's voice-over spy tips talks about the advantages of wearing uniforms or similar clothing (in the context of the episode, it was suits that looked alike) in an organization:

    There's a reason armies wear uniforms even though they make them easier to spot. Sometimes that's what you want. Uniforms suggest organization, power, and numbers. These, in turn, inspire fear. And as any good operative knows, there's no more effective weapon than fear.

  • January 13, 2013
    lexicon
    I prefer your picture with the couple in blue. Yes, people's reaction in-universe and viewers' reaction to the clothes is an important (necessary) part of the trope but some of your examples say nothing about reaction. "The Akatsuki all wear black cloaks with red clouds on them," sounds meaningless. Those Two Guys or Creepy Twins is a case of 'show don't tell.' You've told me something but I can't see how it's a reaction to the clothes or whose reaction it is.
  • January 14, 2013
    peccantis
  • January 14, 2013
    patches365
    In Japan, this phenomenon is called the "Bacouple", a portmanteu of the Japanese word "baka" ("fool") and the English word "couple". I don't know if this would be an appropriate trope name, though, since that word is specifically for romantic couples, whereas this one seems to also apply to twins or teammates.
  • January 14, 2013
    XFllo
    at Tropesof TV: Please don't edit this ykttw without good reason. Why do you keep changing the name?
  • January 14, 2013
    FastEddie
    Kakhi Barn Clothes is an awful name. No idea what it means.
  • January 14, 2013
    MorningStar1337
    Trope Namer Syndrome. Change the name or discard. We do not need any tropes named after stuff from 6teen.
  • January 14, 2013
    XFllo
    at Fast Eddie: Thanks for the intervention! :-)

    at patches365: Hm, perhaps it could be three sub-tropes: A) twins' matching clothes, B) teams and groups, C) romantic couples. Personally I would not mind having the concept together, but if other tropers think otherwise... It might be doable and tropeworthy as sub-tropes.
  • January 14, 2013
    XFllo
    at Morning Star 1337: This Kakhi Barn Clothes was not my idea at all, somebody was messing with this entry.

    However, there are several ideas and crowner for the name will be probably necessary.
  • January 14, 2013
    d2k
    How about "Identical Wardrobes" as a name?
  • January 16, 2013
    XFllo
    To sum up, here are our ideas for naming this trope:

    If we decide to split this up into three sub-tropes, here are the ideas:

    Crowner will follow, hopefully soon. Until that happens - any other ideas?
  • January 16, 2013
    WeAreAllKosh
    Minor edit of main page: Put "One of" in front of "Michael Westen's voice-over spy tips"--not sure why that wasn't copied as-is from the example I gave in the replies, as it makes more sense grammatically, and it was just one of many spy-tips he gives in the show's voiceovers.
  • January 17, 2013
    randomsurfer
    Averted but discussed on Roseanne, when she and some friends of hers open a diner. One of them wears a waitress uniform, being under the belief that the others had also agreed to wear them, but they didn't. She then points out that if they don't all wear the uniform, the uniforms are no longer uniform.
  • January 17, 2013
    XFllo
    at We Are All Kosh: Thank you for doing that, I must have made a mistake when I was adding your example.
  • January 20, 2013
    XFllo
  • January 20, 2013
    XFllo
    I tried to make a single proposition crowner with question whether this should be split. However, I'm not sure whether it will work as it is the very first crowner I created. Any help from more experienced tropers would be appreciated :-)
  • February 1, 2013
    MiinU
    I don't see anything in the OP relating to uniforms (i.e. work clothes, officer's uniform, military, etc.). Would any of those count, or is that somehow different from this trope?
  • February 2, 2013
    WeAreAllKosh
    ^ I wasn't sure if "literal" uniforms applied to this trope, but I submitted the Burn Notice quote about uniforms, because the actual context of that quote involved Westen and his team wearing matching civilian suits (jacket/tie variety) for an op--so like a uniform in terms of the purpose of intimidation etc. (described in the quote), but not a "uniform" in the most literal and understood sense of the word. The quote did provide some reasons matching clothes in general (which the trope does cover) might be used.
  • February 3, 2013
    XFllo
    at Miin U and We Are All Kosh:

    Yes, you're right. I was thinking about it a lot, actually, and I omitted that on purpose because I did not want to list all examples from military setting or American/British high schools, but I actually think the concept is very close, and it might be very well extended.

    Any feedback on that?

    • Matching Clothes for Twins
      • Matching Clothes for Whole Family (I've seen those when I was googling images for "coordinated clothes")
    • Matching Clothes for Romantic Couples
    • Matching Clothes for Groups
      • Sport teams
      • School uniforms
      • Uniforms (military, naval etc.)
      • Work clothes (business suit, scrubs etc.)

    I feel those last four are dangerously close to People Sit On Chairs. (Now I probably fully get what lexicon's take on the twin part of the trope was.)

    Sometimes choosing a team's colours and clothes or getting a new uniform bear great significance for the character, at times it's just omnipresent in those settings.

    Discussion is most welcome. My many thanks to all who have been contributing.
  • February 6, 2013
    MiinU
    @XFllo: It might be best to limit the trope to pairs (for example: twins, Those Two Guys, Heterosexual Life Partners, couples who dress alike, etc.), or relatively small groups, like bowling teams, or fanclub members.

    So long as it isn't a full-fledged organisation which requires a standardized uniform, or a dress code (i.e. military, police officers, corporate attire, etc.), it should be fine.
  • February 9, 2013
    SquirrelGuy
    There was a "Sniglet": "Fods -- noun, couples at amusement parks who wear identical T-shirts". (A Sniglet is any word that doesn't appear in the dictionary, but should. From the HBO comedy series "Not Necessarily the News" and was the subject of several books.)
  • February 9, 2013
    rodneyAnonymous
    I dislike the three-frame image, and besides "teams wearing similar clothes" is People Sit On Chairs.
  • February 10, 2013
    XFllo
    ^ Feel free to suggest a better picture. IMO, As far as it has a significance for the story, it is not People Sit On Chairs, even though it happens in Real Life too.

  • February 23, 2013
    XFllo
    Ok, I've been thinking about it and it might be best to limit this to romantic couples, twins and Those Two Guys. Now the definition includes also small groups of friends and families, but not sport teams.

    Do you think it might be useful to propose another trope - as a Sister Trope perhaps - for groups wearing team shirts (the suggested name Group Spirit Clothing)? Or is it really a classic case of People Sit On Chairs? I think the example from The Simpsons with Mr Burns buying shirts for his bowling buddies shows that it can contribute to the story-telling.

    EDIT: I removed the examples about groups with sport shirts, uniforms and work clothes. They are still included here in the discussion and I saved them in my "to do" list, so if we decide to extend it back for groups, I will put them up again of course.
  • February 23, 2013
    lexicon
    The image with the couple is good. The X Files example looks good with the "murderous clone girls" who "did not grow up together." The Shining is lacking that kind of context.

    • In the Gilmore Girls episode Application Anxiety Lorelia suggests to Rory that the siblings they just met are acting like they're together too much to just be brother and sister and once they come back having changed their clothes Lorelia notes to Rory that they're color coordinated as further proof.
  • March 1, 2013
    Lorialet
    • In Once Upon A Time, Regina and Rumplestiltskin both wore black and blue for an episode after they started a sort of Heel Face Turn and tried to redeem themselves for their loved ones. They are still as antagonistic as ever, and end up disagreeing on the best way to carry this plan.
  • March 1, 2013
    XFllo
    ^ Lorialet, I added your example, but I don't watch Once Upon a Time so I'm unfamiliar who R and R are. Could you explain what is their relationship?

    Anyone else feels I should delete the example from The Shining? I personally think it's Ok.

    We need context for the Hot Fuzz example though. Anyone familiar with it?
  • March 1, 2013
    TrueShadow1
    Let me get this right. A couple wearing the same clothes to show that they are a couple is this trope. A couple wearing the same uniform because they go to the same school is not. Did I get that right?

    If that is the case, I think we don't need separate tropes for matching clothes with couples, twins, or families. Since the point of all of them are the same, to show that they have close relationship. They're intentionally and willingly wear those clothes. A school uniform is not this trope, since the same clothes part is enforced. And honestly, I think teams and organizations enforcing uniforms on its members is People Sit On Chairs.
  • March 1, 2013
    XFllo
    ^ Yes, I think you got that right. Intentionally wearing it = this trope, enforced = not this trope, but perhaps a different one.

    Personally, uniforms at schools feel like a trope to me because we don't wear them here, and it's always an indication that the story is happening at an American or British school. Or very, very fancy private school if it's here. It's often discussed, too, when characters are excited about their new uniform (Rory in Gilmore Girls when she got to Chilton) or they complain about it or try to shorten their skirts or get uniforms made of better material. But that would be a separate trope.

    Teams and organizations, well, I am undecided on this matter. It's omnipresent, true, but there are examples from fiction that characters complain about it and hate that they have to wear a "uniform" (Debra from Dexter or Claire from Six Feet Under come to mind, or the examples from Roseanne and Burn Notice mentioned in the discussion). Or sometimes young officers are extremely proud that they get their first new uniform after being promoted (Horatio Hornblower when he becomes a lieutenant and his fellow mates tease him about it, or similarly William Price in Mansfield Park. His sister really fancies him in his new uniform. Also, red coated soldiers are greatly admired by several ladies in Pride And Prejudice).
  • March 1, 2013
    Noaqiyeum
    To be perfectly thorough, this trope is the reason uniforms exist - to show that all the people wearing it belong together (build morale, encourage unity, prevent friendly fire in military and sports cases...). As an extension, Non Uniform Uniform is a trope because it breaks this pattern in order to show a character's individualism.

    I could see why uniforms might want to be kept out of the examples section for size reasons, but they should at least get a mention in the description.

    Characters being attracted to a person in a military uniform is Good Looking Privates, I believe.
  • March 1, 2013
    XFllo
    ^ Some of this was included in the description at some point or another, but the process of discussing it pushed it away. I am myself somehow undecided on this.

    I think wearing actual uniforms might be a separate trope, though people will be screaming chairs... However, provided the focus would be on playing with examples or those contributing to the story-telling rather than listing all works that happen to have them, it would be a useful trope in my opinion.
  • March 2, 2013
    lexicon
    When 'young officers are extremely proud that they get their first new uniform' it's not the fact that they look like everyone else that they're proud of. If the characters 'complain about it and hate that they have to wear a "uniform"' then they are complaining about the fact that they look like everyone else so that could count. It should also count when a girl tells her boyfriend that they have to dress to match, but he doesn't do it.
  • March 2, 2013
    Noaqiyeum
    "When 'young officers are extremely proud that they get their first new uniform' it's not the fact that they look like everyone else that they're proud of."

    It is, actually, in many respects. It symbolises that they have been accepted into a group they admire, have been acknowledged as embodying the qualities the group idealises, and are worthy of becoming a representative of the group.
  • March 2, 2013
    XFllo
    ^ I agree. Fully.
  • March 2, 2013
    mightymewtron
    In Total Drama Island, Sadie and Katie match their outfits to represent their incredibly strong friendship.
  • March 2, 2013
    lexicon
    I would go with Matching Clothes Of Togetherness. Any of the others can easily be confused with Irritation Is The Sincerest Form Of Flattery, Dresses The Same, or People Sit On Chairs.

    Rereading what X Fllo said earlier, I think teams and organizations can be split into Uniform Of Conformity and Uniform Of Achievement.
  • March 3, 2013
    randomsurfer
    On South Park the Goths are proud of their non-conformity.
    If you wanna be one of the non-conformists, all you have to do is dress just like us and listen to the same music we do.
  • March 4, 2013
    TrueShadow1
  • March 5, 2013
    XFllo
    Five hats. Yay! Thank you, guys.

    Tomorrow I'll try to create a trope naming crowner. (Hopefully I'll be more successful than the last time.)

    I added this to the description, based on your insightful comments:

    This trope originates in wearing uniforms. Uniforms and sports shirts are worn to show that all the people wearing it form a strong group, to build morale and to encourage unity. However, wearing uniforms is enforced. This trope happens only when characters willingly wear the same clothes to show that they belong together, or when somebody willingly tries to copy their role model.

    If you have any issues with the article - both the description or the examples, please say so. Feedback is still most welcome.
  • March 5, 2013
    XFllo
    Also, I forgot to add this example. I honestly overlooked it, but I really don't know which section it belongs to:

    It's from Squirrel Guy:
    • There was a "Sniglet": "Fods -- noun, couples at amusement parks who wear identical T-shirts". (A Sniglet is any word that doesn't appear in the dictionary, but should. From the HBO comedy series "Not Necessarily the News" and was the subject of several books.)

    Real Life? Live Action TV? Is the word "fod(s)" used? I must do some Googling.
  • March 5, 2013
    lexicon
    I like the note about uniforms. Somebody willingly trying to copy their role model is Irritation Is The Sincerest Form Of Flattery. If that variation counts then it would be a sub-trope, but I thought this was for when both people feel like they belong together.
  • March 6, 2013
    XFllo
    ^ Tropes can be combined. I noted this from the start of this discussion that it can be a variation. When you try to imitate somebody, copying the clothes is the easiest thing to do. It's intentional and willing, even if only "one way", and the person who is copied might welcome it at first. Tropes Are Flexible.
  • March 6, 2013
    XFllo
  • March 6, 2013
    randomsurfer
    ^^^^Sniglets could be either Literature or Live Action TV. It originated as a segment on the HBO comedy series Not Necessarily The News which spawned a series of books (each the size of an average Garfield collection, if that means anything to you) (and were later loathed by the creator). In this case, the word "Fods" was defined as Squirrel Guy describes. I don't know whether it was from the broadcast version or the book version, or whether it was something creator Rich Hall made up or one of his at-home correspondents sent it in.
  • March 8, 2013
    dotchan
    • Detective Conan - In her debut scene, Kazuha is shown to be very jealous when Ran accidentally shows up in the same shirt as Heiji (and so Ran changes out of it); two identical necklaces are a subtle hint that another pair of characters are secretly seeing each other; then, at the end of this mystery, Ran and Kazuha end up switching shirts for a Brick Joke.
  • March 8, 2013
    dotchan
    • Detective Conan - In her debut scene, Kazuha is shown to be very jealous when Ran accidentally shows up in the same shirt as Heiji (and so Ran changes out of it); two identical necklaces are a subtle hint that another pair of characters are romantically inclined; then, at the end of this mystery, Ran and Kazuha end up switching shirts for a Brick Joke.
  • March 8, 2013
    XFllo
    ^ dotchan, thanks for the examples, could you elaborate on them? What are the relationships among them? Accidentally makes it sound more like Dresses The Same. Does the jealous person interprets it as lovers' matching clothes? Don't forget about proper Example Indentation.
  • March 9, 2013
    lakingsif
    In Hot Fuzz the Andys are two inseparable detectives who, though not very good at their job, certainly dress for it.
  • March 9, 2013
    XFllo
    ^ thanks!
  • March 11, 2013
    XFllo
    Seems like the title Coordinated Clothes is winning, though not a lot of tropers have voted. I'll let the crowner open for about a week, and I think then it might be ready to be launched.
  • March 13, 2013
    lexicon
    Now that I think about it, 'coordinated' implies that they intended to look the same so they have togetherness. This looks ready to launch as is.
  • March 14, 2013
    XFllo
    I will launch this trope at the weekend. If anybody has final comments, now is the time.
  • March 15, 2013
    shimaspawn
    Mod Hat

    Called crowner
  • March 15, 2013
    SquirrelGuy
    Perhaps a caveat could be added, that many identical twins HATE being forced to dress alike, at least beyond the age that they are old enough to have a say in the matter. Some, but not all, psychologists are also opposed, saying it robs each twin of their individuality.
  • March 15, 2013
    XFllo
    ^ Sure, it sounds fine. Do you mean in the description or in the Real Life wick?
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=unr3feyozgfxnf4tys7ihasf&trope=CoordinatedClothes