Created By: TheNerdyNinja on December 7, 2012 Last Edited By: MorningStar1337 on August 11, 2016

Exempt From Physics

A character\'s actions do not conform to the physics of their world

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One of the nice things about fiction is that a creator need not feel bound to realism. This is the reason tropes like Made of Iron and Gravity Is a Harsh Mistress exist in the first place. However, in a sort of Magic A Is Magic A way, worlds have their own rules. Wile E. Coyote from Looney Tunes can blow himself up multiple times per episode and still survive, while Avatar: The Last Airbender, while still obviously fantasy, would never have that quite that same level of Cartoon Physics.

However, there are, on occasion, characters who move like they're in a different show altogether. They break the world's established rules of physics. These characters are Exempt from Physics. Most often, the physics-defying nature of these characters is justified by Rule of Funny.

This is not a trope referencing characters who are the only person in a world to have a certain power. These are characters who are more like a type of Reality Warper, though it's more like reality warps around them. Flight is also not a case of this if it is a superpower or magic based.

While Newtonian Physics is common in some fiction with deviations from it being unusual, sometimes The Verse runs on Toon Physics instead making anything more realistic outside the norm. Both are cases of this trope because a character bends the metaphysical rules of the verse.

Weirdness Coupon has an overlap with this, but this trope deals with people doing thing that should be impossible by the physics of the setting. Weirdness Coupon is basically excusing a character for erratic behavior because that behavior is typical of them.

Compare Wrong Context Magic, Weirdness Coupon and Weirdness Magnet, see also Beyond the Impossible. Sub-Trope of Artistic License – Physics. Eldritch Abominations are this by their extra-physical nature, but played for horror and drama.


Examples

     Anime and Manga 
  • FLCL's physics seem fairly grounded in reality—except for anything caused by Haruko.
  • Old Coco-jii in Tengen Toppa Gurren Lagann shows up in the strangest of places in ways that seem impossible even by the loose physics of that setting.

     Comic Books 

     Film 
  • In Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Toons act like this when they leave Toon Town, as they still run on Cartoon Physics while objects and people around them behave more realistically. It's both Played for Laughs and Played for Drama: dropping a piano on a man is a hilarious gag in a cartoon, but in Real Life it's deadly. When Eddie goes to Toontown he is affected by the Cartoon Physics of that area, the opposite of the Toons who leave Toontown but take Toontown physics with them.
  • All the 'toon characters in Space Jam adhere to Toon Physics because they're 'toons. Michael Jordan, however, as a recruit from the Real World, plays on Bugs Bunny's TuneSquad team using only his awesome athletic skills. It's not until Bugs Bunny points out that he can do anything in Looney Tune Land as long as he believes that he can does Jordan find a way to score the game-winning points, by exempting himself from normal physics.

     Literature 
  • In The Last Continent, Rincewind acquires a horse (Snowy) that's able to ascend sheer surfaces, perch on the underside of rocky overhangs, and trot uncaringly atop a falling avalanche.

     Web Original 
  • Homsar from Homestar Runner. While all the characters have wildly different designs, the world maintains a fairly consistent use of Invisible Anatomy. However, Homsar moves differently from most others, hovering around, and warping reality around him to a minor extent.
  • Captain SNES: The Game Masta: This happens when Crono is transported to the Final Fantasy verse. In Final Fantasy, battle takes place on a separate screen, but Chrono Trigger's happen on the movement screen, meaning Crono can, and does, fire his ultimate spell at them without them even able to fight back.

     Western Animation 
  • Pinkie Pie, of My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic. She seemingly warps from place to place, has taken items from Hammer Space several times and even Twilight Sparkle is baffled by certain aspects of her (namely, her Pinkie Sense). "Party of One" also demonstrates the physics she defies relative to others (As her mane goes from Quirky Curls to a plain straight hairstyle, then poofs back up at the end of the episode, she has beaten Rainbow Dash to several places). Do note that magic is in this setting, and all three pony types have it, but only the unicorns can actually use magic. The magic of Earth Ponies and Pegasi is more passive in nature.
  • Mikey Simons from Kappa Mikey. Interestingly, instead of acting more animated than the rest of the world, he's actually less animated, being animated in the Western cartoon style as opposed to his Animeesque cast mates, who frequently make use of many anime Art Shifts.
  • Kenny from South Park can die over and over again, with everyone forgetting that he did die and him reintegrating the plot like nothing happened.
  • The Basehead in Black Dynamite, who is able to do Offscreen Teleportation at will, not because he's a Magical Negro but because he's a Basehead.
  • In The Proud Family certain members of the Proud Family, especially Oscar, exhibit "toon" characteristics that don't apply to the rest of the cast. While Oscar, and sometimes Penny, can stretch and come back, everyone else has a more "realistic" threshold of movement and pain.
  • In The Lion King, Zazu is an Iron Butt Monkey who survives getting trampled by a herd of animals with a few scratches during "I Just Can't Wait To Be King". However, when Mufasa gets trampled by a herd of animals, the results are much more realistic.
  • All characters in Disney's Treasure Planet are affected by gravity, either natural or artificial, except Ridiculously Cute Critter Morph, who usually floats about head-high off the ground / deck. Being also a Blob Monster, Morph's body can be separated into many small pieces without injury; the pieces can act in concert with Morph's consciousness, and Morph can easily reform into a whole creature at will.
Community Feedback Replies: 152
  • December 7, 2012
    MorganWick
    Please take care to avoid Trope Namer Syndrome.
  • December 7, 2012
    MorningStar1337
    As much as I woud like for MLP to create/name more tropes Trope Namer Syndrome makes it Difficult But Awesome. Also We already have Reality Warper making this trope come from the Department Of Redundancy Department.
  • December 7, 2012
    MorganWick
    It would help if you suffered from a little less Fan Myopia and had a little more creativity; we're so sick of "X Syndrome" titles not only is Trope Namer Syndrome an intentional riff on them, I'm not sure we have any of them anymore (except Cerebus Syndrome where Cerebus isn't the real trope namer anyway). The best way to have a Trope Namer is if it makes sense without knowing where it comes from, as with MLP's most successful Trope Namer to date, Twenty Percent More Awesome.
  • December 7, 2012
    TheHandle
    • Kenny from South Park can die over and over again, with everyone forgetting that he did die and him reintegrating the plot like nothing happened. It was later given an in-universe explanation.

  • December 7, 2012
    MorganWick
    Oh great, I just railed against one snowclone, and now I find myself sorely tempted to suggest a Screw The XI Have Y snowclone. Living Laws Of Physics Exception? I got nothing.
  • December 7, 2012
    Xtifr
    I agree that this is already covered by Reality Warper, although it might be possible to make this a subtrope: someone for whom reality simply doesn't matter. It's a standard cartoon trope, though, dating back at least to Looney Tunes (Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Roadrunner, etc.). The name absolutely has to go. I have no idea what a Pinky Pie is. Since it's connected to this My Little Pony show, I would guess it's a pony rather than an actual pie, but I assure you I would have never guessed that.

    You'll find plenty of examples that fit this trope under Reality Warper if you decide to go ahead with it, but you must find a better name. Possibly Reality Ignorer?
  • December 7, 2012
    MorganWick
  • December 7, 2012
    Xtifr
    ^ Oh I can mock 'em much worse than that. I chose to be polite. :)

    I agree that we can probably do better than Reality Ignorer. That was just off the top of my head.
  • December 7, 2012
    MorningStar1337
    Might I suggest Follows Their Own Physics ?
  • December 7, 2012
    StarSword
    @Morgan Wick: I know it won't be used, but I can't help but suggest Screw Physics Im A Horse in reference to a certain Skyrim meme.
  • December 7, 2012
    StarSword
    Edited by Arivne to prevent a picture from breaking YKTTW. Original Poster was Star Sword. Star Sword, to put your name back on this post just edit it in any way, such as by deleting this paragraph.

    And here's the example and image to go with it:

    <insert appropriately snarky comment>[[note
    Source[[/note]]]]


  • December 7, 2012
    SharleeD
    Related to the above:

    • In The Last Continent, Rincewind acquires a horse (Snowy) that's able to ascend sheer surfaces, perch on the underside of rocky overhangs, and trot uncaringly atop a falling avalanche.

    I do think this isn't necessarily quite the same as Reality Warper, as that one generally seems to involve some active volition or power on the warper's part. This seems more like the environment responding differently to the character regardless of what they intend or feel.
  • December 7, 2012
    TheHandle
    ¨Quite so. A Pinkie Pie isn't the same as a Haruhi or a Myzplk or a Bat-Mite. So it's not really a subtrope.

    @Neighsayers: I feel confident that you'll never be able to speak badly about the show without watching it, which you're not interested in doing. Sniping at the fans is so much easier; it requires practically no work. At any rate, Pinkie Pie is sure to become as iconic and identifiable as Bat Man, so naming this trope after her isn't a problem in the long term.

    In the short term, Exempt From The Laws Of Nature might work adequately. There's also
  • December 7, 2012
    Luc
    Rename to Exempt From The Laws Of Nature or Reality Ignorer, but yeah, this is a valid trope.
  • December 7, 2012
    MorganWick
    ^^I hope you're being sarcastic.

    Now I'm tempted to go with I Reject Your Reality And Substitute My Own. Reality Rejecter? Substitutes Their Own Reality? We already have I Reject Your Reality...

    Oh, and image macros, and meme images in general, are off-limits as trope images per word of Fast Eddie.
  • December 7, 2012
    rodneyAnonymous
    If tropeworthy, sub- (sister-?) trope of Reality Warper. It is The Same But Not Intentional.

    "At any rate, Pinkie Pie is sure to become as iconic and identifiable as Bat Man..."

    Even if that weren't extraordinarily unlikely, no, that doesn't make it "not a problem". The current name is invalid and must be changed. Many things are debatable, but that (and "No Image Macro Page Images") is not.
  • December 7, 2012
    StarSword
    "No Image Macro Page Images"

    Sorry, didn't know that.
  • December 7, 2012
    MetaFour
    "At any rate, Pinkie Pie is sure to become as iconic and identifiable as Bat Man, so naming this trope after her isn't a problem in the long term."

    Speaking as one brony to another, I doubt that. And even if Pinkie Pie is going to be as iconic as Batman in two years, we don't want a trope title that will make sense in two years; we want a title that makes sense to the majority of our readers now.

    Anyway...

    This trope strikes me as a parallel to Cloud Cuckoo Lander. A CCL's mind seems to operate in some alternate plane of reality, while this character's body operates by the rules of physics from some alternate plane of reality.
  • December 7, 2012
    TheNerdyNinja
    I agree that "Pinkie Pie Physics" isn't exactly a good choice of name. I could not, for the life of me, figure out what else to call it, so I just named it after the most noticeable follower of this trope.

    Also, comparing it to Reality Warper was probably a bit of a mistake. I personally don't see it as particularly similar. A Reality Warper reshapes reality to their will--sometimes unconsciously, sometimes consciously. This trope refers more to characters where the reality just...doesn't apply. I suppose that there may be some potential overlap with Reality Warper, especially when the characters actually note it (for example, you could argue that Homsar is a Reality Warper based on the fact that other characters notice how out-of-place it is), but looking through the Reality Warper page, very few of those characters actually apply. The only relevant examples that I caught are The Mask and Aladdin's Genie.

    As for potential other names...Ignorant Of Physics? Physics Lawbreaker? Exempt From The Laws Of Physics might work, but I don't really like Reality Ignorer, by virtue of "ignorer" bugging me by not being a real word. Reality Ignorance, perhaps?
  • December 7, 2012
    MorganWick
    It is absolutely a word. "Ignore" is a transitive verb. Ergo, an "ignorer" is one who ignores.
  • December 7, 2012
    TheNerdyNinja
    Okay, yes, granted. Ignorer is perfectly correct from a grammatical standpoint. It's just a word that's almost never used (to he point that spellcheck is alerting me to it) and that it just sounds weird and unnatural to me.

    But this isn't the place to discuss linguistics. I apologize for the derailment.
  • December 7, 2012
    rodneyAnonymous
    ^^^ I interpret that as an argument that it's The Same But Less. We have no idea whether Genie is willing himself to break laws of physics and there is no way to check. Fine, it's a different thing, but it's closely related.

  • December 7, 2012
    aurora369
    Don't tell me I need to watch that dreaded show which is worse than Twilight to understand what the trope is about.
  • December 8, 2012
    billybobfred
    Magic A Is Not Magic A? Feels a bit snow-cloney.

    Then again, the trope is basically "character-based subversions of Magic A Is Magic A"
  • December 8, 2012
    Arivne
  • December 8, 2012
    m8e
    Related to Weirdness Coupon?
  • December 8, 2012
    StarSword
    May also be related too My Rules Are Not Your Rules. Supertrope to one part of Automaton Horse.

    Going off TheNerdyNinja, what about Exempt From Physics?
  • December 8, 2012
    SeptimusHeap
    Almost came up with Pinkie Pies Magic Rules Exception.
  • January 5, 2015
    DAN004
    How would this relate to Wrong Context Magic?
  • January 5, 2015
    KyleJacobs
  • January 5, 2015
    TheHandle
    I like it too.

    Follows Their Own Physics is also good.
  • January 6, 2015
    PhantomDusclops92
    Why not Physics Warper?
  • January 6, 2015
    mr.whim
  • January 6, 2015
    SolipSchism
    I'm tossing my vote on Exempt From Physics.

    Pinkie Pie needs to be excised from not only the title, but the description as well. This is not "sniping at MLP" or at the fans, it's pointing out a bad case of Trope Namer Syndrome.

    @billybobfred: Except that magic may or may not come into play at all.
  • January 6, 2015
    Snicka
    Physics Defier? I agree that Pinkie Pie is a Bad Trope Namer.
  • January 6, 2015
    SolipSchism
    ^ I'm not wild about any names that suggest deliberate action on the part of the character. Passive/accidental keywords like "Forgot", "Exempt", "Ignore", etc. would be better.
  • January 6, 2015
    Snicka
  • January 6, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    Wow somebody necrobumped this old thing.

    Anyway I changed the name and description and elaborated more on Pinkie Pie. However I am placing this up for grabs. If anyone wants to take over the draft, it's yours...

    wait I'm not the sponsor...
  • January 6, 2015
    DAN004
    I think this is about a character, right? Then the title should mention the fact that it's a character we're taking about here.

    Maybe Accidental Reality Warper or Verse Physics Breaker?

    Btw how would Achievements In Ignorance relate to this?
  • January 6, 2015
    Karxrida
    Maybe for a name Physics Shmysics/Physics Shmisics/something with better spelling could work? I'd be really annoying trying to remember the spelling, but then again we have stuff like the Japanese name tropes.
  • January 6, 2015
    SolipSchism
    I'm still really fond of the current (new) title.
  • January 6, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    BTW what happened to The Nerdy Ninja? I want to know if hes interesting in taking back the draft?
  • January 7, 2015
    Arivne
    ^ The OP TheNerdyNinja last edited a trope/work page on December 18th 2013. He's long gone, so anyone can take this over.
  • January 7, 2015
    DAN004
    Go ahead and take this over, Mr. Morningstar.
  • January 7, 2015
    DAN004
    Go ahead and take this over, Mr. Morningstar.
  • January 7, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    Okay I added the missing examples and folders. is there any problems with this draft?
  • January 7, 2015
    Karxrida
    Change the sentence "These characters exempt physics" into a Title Drop "are exempt from physics."

    There should also be a mention about how flying doesn't necessarily apply for this trope if it's a superpower or magic-based; the character in question should be the only exception and (possibly) noted as an anomaly.
  • January 7, 2015
    DAN004
    Basically this guy's antics go Beyond The Impossible.
  • January 7, 2015
    SolipSchism
    ^^ Yeah... I'm not sure "These characters exempt physics" is grammatically correct in the first place. "Exempt" as a verb basically means "to make exempt from", so "These characters exempt physics" means they are making physics exempt from something.

    ...Maybe they make physics exempt from physics?

    Also ^^ Flying should never apply as this trope if it's a superpower or magic-based. The description explicitly states that a character who is unique in having a certain ability is not an example. This is not about characters who explicitly have a certain power, it's about characters who are basically Off Model, but in terms of the rules of their existence rather than their animation, and really should not be an explicitly stated ability or power or quality (unless it's being Lampshaded or Played With).
  • January 7, 2015
    Paycheckgurl
    • In The Proud Family certain members of the Proud Family, especially Oscar, exhibit "toon" characteristics that don't apply to the rest of the cast. While Oscar, and sometimes Penny, can stretch and come back, everyone else has a more "realistic" threshold of movement and pain.
  • January 7, 2015
    randomsurfer
    Also in Roger Rabbit when Eddie goes to Toontown he is affected by the Cartoon Physics of that area, the opposite of the Toons who leave Toontown but take Toontown physics with them.
  • January 7, 2015
    SolipSchism
    ^ That's a good inverted and "explicitly stated" example—instead of one character, all the Toons are the example. (Well, maybe not "epxlicitly stated", but clearly an In Universe acknowledged quality.)
  • January 7, 2015
    DAN004
    Again, see also Beyond The Impossible
  • January 7, 2015
    SolipSchism
    ^ Would this be a Sub Trope of BTI? By its very nature, I think anything fitting in this trope should be BTI.
  • January 7, 2015
    Snicka
    ^^^ Interestingly, it's not a complete inversion: when Eddie enters Toontown, Cartoon Physics also gets applied to him, despite being a real person, while Toons keep their cartoony abilities outside Toontown, too.

    How about this example:
  • January 7, 2015
    SolipSchism
    ^ Re: Lion King, I like it.
  • January 7, 2015
    ginsengaddict
    ^^ Seconded - great example.

    • Thepremise of The Matrix is that anyone, but especially Neo, can break the laws of physics by realizing the world is just a simulation of reality.
  • January 7, 2015
    crazysamaritan
  • January 8, 2015
    oneuglybunny
    Western Animation
    • Given that he's the infant son of Mister Incredible and ElastiGirl, baby Jack-Jack from Pixar's short cartoon Jack Jack Attack exhibits behaviors far outside those of normal infants, such as teleporting, invisibility, phasing through solids, bursting into flame and shooting laser beams from his eyes. Altogether, Jack Jack overwhelms his sitter, Kari, who gladly dumps her charge onto her relief, Syndrome.
  • January 8, 2015
    SolipSchism
    ^^ This; Matrix doesn't count.

    ^ I feel like this is also Reality Warper, or one of any number of the Magic And Powers tropes.
  • January 8, 2015
    crazysamaritan
    It could be rephrased to an example. Supers normally only have one suite of powers, the creators gave Jack Jack the ability to switch instead to represent the future is unknown.
  • January 8, 2015
    SolipSchism
    But if he just explicitly has a unique superpower, that's not this trope.
  • January 8, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    ^ I agree. This falls closer towards Combo Platter Powers than this.

    I'm debating on whether Ash and Team Rocket surviving Pikachu's lightning attacks is this or not. (Also related is that TR blasts off constantly in most of the series, usually in ways that are normally deadly but since they are the only one that gets blased sky high, I'm not sure if it is an aversion)
  • January 8, 2015
    SolipSchism
    ^ Hmm. Do other characters get fatally electrocuted? Because if everyone who gets electrocuted on the show survives it, that wouldn't fit here.

    Team Rocket is an interesting one. But how often does anyone on that show actually die? I'm pretty sure it's just a textbook case of Nobody Can Die, occasionally averted for drama, but very, very rarely.

    If I remember correctly. It's been a long time since I've watched Pokemon.
  • January 8, 2015
    TotalDramaRox97
  • January 8, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    ^ That could be a supertrope. This is where that trope is centered on one character while the shows physics is consistent to everyone else in the setting (Which the physics themselves are realistic or not is of no concern, whether the physics involving a certain character who is not a Reality Warper is relatively realistic compared to everyone else is, either by choice [Like say someone written a character that had been affected by a reality warper, rare magic spell or Cosmic Horror] or by accident [See the Skyrim example])
  • January 8, 2015
    Karxrida
    ^^^^Not an example since it's happened to other people too, and it used to occur somewhat frequently to Ash in earlier episodes. Sounds more like Cartoon Physics.
  • January 8, 2015
    DAN004
    How would Slap Stick be related to this?
  • January 8, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    ^ In the case of the Ex tropenamer, it facilitated a lot of gags (paticualy in Feeling Pinkie Keen,). In general I think that Rule Of Funny is a reason why this trope is in place, the other reasons are less comedit (Eldritch Abominations, Humanoid Abominations and Animalistic Abominations can be exempt from the physics of out reality. Inter-dimensional travelers could either be this or conform to the physics of the dimensions they're visiting Depending On The Writer)
  • January 10, 2015
    Snicka
    Most often, the physics-defying nature of these characters is justified by Rule Of Funny.
  • January 10, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    ^ Thanks for putting that into something I can use for the article.
  • January 10, 2015
    DAN004
    Compare Eldritch Abomination when this is Played For Drama.
  • January 10, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    ^ Im not sure Eldritch Abomination is the dramatic counterpart. Characters in this trope (like say Pinkie Pie) do not generally reduce everyone near them to insane wrecks just by merely existing there. Uncanny Valley may be closer.
  • January 10, 2015
    DAN004
    ^ EA covers beings with extra-physical properties, thus making them Exempt From Physics in a dramatic way (played for suspense and horror).
  • January 11, 2015
    NemuruMaeNi
    Aren't South Park and My Little Pony examples covered by Weirdness Coupon? Looking at things like Skyrim's (definitely not an intentional part of the narration), this ykttw is a lump of subjective stuff (YMMV) and Weirdness Coupon.
  • January 11, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    ^ Maybe, though the MLP example was the ex-Trope Namer, so I assume this thing was made with her in mind. Also I'm pretty sure the consistency of physics (and magic) aren't subjective. You can objectionably say that you can Violate the Square Cube Law in Gurren Lagann, but not in say K On.
  • January 12, 2015
    DAN004
    So okay, explain how this isn't Weirdness Coupon.
  • January 12, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    ^ Off the bat, the diffrences are:

    • Lack of Lampshades (Examples of weirdness coupons tend to have an "oh it's just X" thing)
    • And the whole "inconsistent physics" thing (Physics doesn't prevent you from driving a truck/pig graveyard around, have homoetotic subtext, or be The Jester/Fool. Likewise you can replicate items in Star Trek, but not say, a western)

    There is a bit of an overlap though
  • January 12, 2015
    DAN004
  • January 12, 2015
    DAN004
  • January 13, 2015
    Arivne
    • Blue Linked (Subtrope, hammerspace).
    • Examples section
      • Added a line separating the Description and Examples sections.
      • Namespaced and italicized work names.
      • Pot Holed Pinkie Sense to Spider Sense.
      • De-capitalized (Physics, Goes, Magic).
      • Corrected (WesternAniamtion/KappaMikey) to (WesternAnimation/KappaMikey).
  • January 13, 2015
    Espun
    Anime
    • Ronnie Schiatto from Baccano is a demon (or, in his own words, an alchemist who lived too long).
      Huey Laforet (about Ronnie): Simply by walking this earth, by living and breathing and acting, you warp the rules of the universe and bring them to their knees. The laws of physics do not apply to you; you break them so easily that to you, it is second nature.
  • January 13, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    ^ >you warp the rules of the universe and bring them to their knees

    Um.. That seems like Reality Warper to me
  • January 15, 2015
    Karxrida
    Weirdness Coupon is about people accepting that certain characters/groups of characters do weird things and don't question it, and isn't necessarily about them doing impossible things (at least that's what I got from it; it looks like a definition expansion may be needed). They do seem to be related and can overlap.
  • January 15, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    ^ If anyone can help me elaborate on that it would be appreciated
  • January 19, 2015
    oneuglybunny
    Western Animation
    • All characters in Disney's Treasure Planet are affected by gravity, either natural or artificial, except Ridiculously Cute Critter Morph, who usually floats about head-high off the ground / deck. Being also a Blob Monster, Morph's body can be separated into many small pieces without injury; the pieces can act in concert with Morph's consciousness, and Morph can easily reform into a whole creature at will.
  • January 19, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    ^ I'll add that, but I'm on the fence as to whether that counts.
  • January 20, 2015
    Karxrida
    ^^I think that's supposed to be a species trait, so it probably doesn't count unless someone pointed out that it's weird.
  • January 22, 2015
    Snicka
    ^ But then Eldritch Abominations are explicitly mentioned in the description, and I think their extra-physical nature is also a species trait.
  • January 22, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    ^ Maybe, but I'm not adding examples of that trope in this trope. Its there for a compare and contrast thing.
  • January 22, 2015
    Snicka
    How about the following example?
    • Any character who wears the eponymous mask from The Mask will be able to do physically impossible feats.
  • January 22, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    ^ I'll consider that, but as it is a magic artifact, it may not count (part of what defines the trope is that the physical inconsistency is unexplained)
  • January 22, 2015
    DAN004
    Now I have a thought: just like The Mask example, what would we do with cases of a magical thing/person in an otherwise normal world?
  • January 22, 2015
    oneuglybunny
    Permit me to defend the Morph example from Treasure Planet: all the other characters, though animated, seem to adhere to the Laws of Physics as we know them. Contrast Morph, an alien creature that much more closely adheres to Toon Physics. Really, at one point, Morph converts himself into a cream pie, and smashes himself into Scroop's face! Morph is gravity-optional, pleomorphic, non-contiguous and transubstantial; how much more "exempt" do you need? Oh, and someone did point out Morph's weirdness: when Jim Hawkins first encountered Morph, Morph was mimicking a spoon so well that Jim was completely fooled. "What is that thing," he asks of Mister Silver.
  • January 22, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    ^^ Check to see if there or other objects or people like them, then see if there are any differences in how they work regarding differences, and then exclude any one-of-a-kind examples (like the Mask) for there is now way to check if there are other similar artifacts. If the people or objects are explicitly magical then they are also excuded
  • January 22, 2015
    Gideoncrawle
    A couple of the current examples have multiple problems not necessarily related to the trope description:

    The Lion King: 1) Pointless Bold Inflation—behind a spoiler tag, no less. 2) Unneeded spoiler; just end the example text with "the results are much more realistic" and leave it at that. 3) Trope pothole within spoilered text; this defeats the purpose of spoiler tagging. 4) Misuse of Killed Off For Real; that trope requires not only permanent death, but also a setting where the permanence of death can't be assumed. The Lion King operates under All Deaths Final.

    South Park: 1) Pointless Bold Inflation—behind a spoiler tag, no less. 2) Excessive spoiler tagging; saying that something is given an in-universe explanation with no details of said explanation is not a spoiler by any reasonable definition. Spoilers are major revelations/twists, not "anything that's less than obvious''.
  • January 22, 2015
    DAN004
    ^ dat bold inflation is a ykttw bug.
  • January 22, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    ^^ What DAN 004 said, If you noticed every spoiler has that Bold Inflation problem. As for South park I'm gonna need to know what that explaination is, and judge the example accordingly.
  • January 23, 2015
    Gideoncrawle
    ^ No, I hadn't noticed. I've been on TV Tropes a couple of years now, but I'm new to ykttw.
  • January 24, 2015
    DAN004
    ^ welcome, then.
  • January 24, 2015
    Snicka
    Mufasa's death is still a spoiler, so either spoiler tag "he gets killed", or, as Gideoncrawle proposed it, remove it and end the sentence with "the results are much more realistic".
  • January 25, 2015
    Chabal2
    Avatar The L Ast Airbender and Legend Of Korra both have individuals who are capable of performing feats of elemental bending thought impossible. Toph creates metalbending by acting on the particles of earth in the metal, Yakone and his sons can bloodbend at any time (it normally can only be done during a full moon), Amon can permanently remove a person's bending ability (something only the Avatar should be able to do as an application of his bloodbending powers), Ghazan turns rock into magma and uses it like a waterbender, and Zaheer eventually learns to fly, something only a single airbender had ever done before him.
  • January 25, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    ^ Yeah...no. Most of these cases are proven to be repeatable (infact, Metalbending, Lightningbending are not even esoteric in the Legend of Korra), The Bloodbending thing can be explained with Training From Hell. Zaheer's Flight is also explainable. (see Enlightened Antagonist for why). This isn't exempt from physics, most of these aren't even violations of Magic A Is Magic A. Also, the people know the bending variations exist and how they work. in contrast, no one in Friendship Is Magic knows how Pinkie's Offscreen Teleportation or Pinkie Sense works.
  • January 26, 2015
    Chabal2
    Yakone's trial makes it clear it was thought impossible (and use Toph's metalbending as another example), and it's hereditary, not trainable.
  • January 26, 2015
    DAN004
    ^ wouldn't that be Beyond The Impossible?
  • January 27, 2015
    Karxrida
    ^Beyond The Impossible has to be explicitly impossible In Universe, and it's made clear that it wasn't impossible (just thought to be).

    Also, the Skyrim example needs to be removed. It's not In Universe, just the result of bad programming/Good Bad Bugs and YMMV stuff like memes is frowned upon on the main page unless it's referenced In Universe or invoked.
  • January 27, 2015
    DAN004
    I think the examples must be inexplicable and/or unexplained. For The Legend Of Korra, all of them have explanations/basis for what they did.
  • January 27, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    ^ This guy gets it. Examples here have to be inexplicable or unexplained. That's why Superpowers and explicit use of Magic (inducing bending) are not examples
  • January 27, 2015
    randomsurfer
    The Black Condor from The Golden Age Of Comic Books was raised by a flock of intelligent condors which somehow makes him able to fly. The flying power was later Reconned into exposure to radiation; but in the original it was just being in the flock that made him able to learn to fly.
  • January 28, 2015
    Karxrida
    Removed the Pom-Pom mention (I'm allowed to do that right?) since Examples Are Not Arguable and it's clear he's some sort of balloon creature that lets him do what he does. Cause balloons and stuff.
  • February 1, 2015
    Skylite

    • Marvel Comics: Madcap, Slapstick and anyone from Poppup and anyone from the Technarchy.
      • Madcap and Slapstick have Toon Physics as part of their powerset.
      • The aliens from Poppup operate on Toon type physics, which is to say they would be flattened comically by any attack that would incapacitate, seriously injure or kill anyone not-invulnerable in the Marvel Universe. You can drop a tank on Hulk or Juggernaut. They'll get ticked off. You can drop a Tank on Spider-Man. He'll dodge or get badly injured. The Poppup aliens are also shapeshifters.
      • The Technarch aliens are techno-shapeshifters, and they operate with their own sense of gravity. See the Phalanx and Magus, and Warlock as examples of Technarch aliens.

  • February 1, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    ^ You're gonna need to prove those aren't derived from superpowers (And yes, Freakazoid is meant to be a superhero pastiche)
  • February 5, 2015
    SolipSchism
    ^ Not to mention, neither one really explains how they fit the trope, especially the Marvel one.
  • February 5, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    ^ or that matter Cartoon Physics unless there an explanation for their limitation or that they are not the norm (Like in the Rodger Rabbit example, and the ex-tropenamer's "Pinkie Sense" and Offscreen Teleportation) are generally disallowed. So Freazoid would had been disqualified (along with it's sister shows, Animaniacs and Tiny Toon Adventualst and those 2's parent franchise, the Looney Tunes)
  • February 12, 2015
    DRCEQ
    • Mainly for the Rule Of Cool, Tachikomas from Ghost In The Shell Stand Alone Complex seem to be exempt from Newton's 3rd Law most of the time. These Spider Tanks are the size of a small car, yet can use their wires to leap and swing around their surroundings with ease and gracefully land on windows and other surfaces without shattering them on impact.
  • February 12, 2015
    SolipSchism
    ^ I think that's just run-of-the-mill Artistic License Physics.
  • February 13, 2015
    DRCEQ
    And it is currently listed as such on both pages, but the Tachikomas are for the most part the only ones who consistently do that. I didn't know if this trope including more serious-natured series or not.
  • February 13, 2015
    SolipSchism
    I'm not sure, to be honest. Although I'm focusing less on the "is this the only character that can do this" and more on the "is this a really visibly egregious violation of physics". A few seconds of Fridge Logic will highlight the Tachikomas, but your average six-year-old would immediately pick up on the fact that horses can't actually walk up a vertical surface, whereas I'm not sure the Tachikoma not smashing windows on impact is quite as blatant. That's getting way down into the weeds and turning it into an Audience Reaction, though. I would let the sponsor weigh in on that one.
  • February 13, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    ^ If the sponsor cared about this draft now, I wouldn't be making these edits. I'm the Closest Thing We Got so I'll weigh my opinions. This is meant to be an In Universe trope, not an Audience Reaction or a YMMV item
  • February 13, 2015
    Skylite
    Updated my Madcap/Slapstick entry and removed Freakazoid due to the Looney Tunes disallowment.
  • February 15, 2015
    DRCEQ
    If it's In-Universe applications only, then I wouldn't count my Tachikoma example, as it is never noted.
  • February 26, 2015
    Karxrida
    The two examples in the Anime and Manga folder are current ZCE and need to be expanded.
  • February 27, 2015
    Chabal2
    Captain SNES: This happens when Crono is transported to the Final Fantasy verse. In Final Fantasy, battle takes place on a separate screen, but Chrono Trigger's happen on the movement screen, meaning Crono can, and does, fire his ultimate spell at them without them even able to fight back.
  • February 27, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    ^^ Okay then can anyone elaborate on these examples?
  • March 17, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    Still need help with the Anime/Manga folder
  • March 31, 2015
    oneuglybunny
    Well, if the Roger Rabbit example counts, this should, too:

    Film
    • All the 'toon characters in Space Jam adhere to Toon Physics because they're 'toons. Michael Jordan, however, as a recruit from the Real World, plays on Bugs Bunny's TuneSquad team using only his awesome athletic skills. It's not until Bugs Bunny points out that he can do anything in Looney Tune Land as long as he believes that he can does Jordan find a way to score the game-winning points, by exempting himself from normal physics.
  • March 31, 2015
    KyleJacobs
    That might actually count as an inversion.
  • March 31, 2015
    DAN004
    ^^ that is a straight example for Jordan until he averts it.
  • March 31, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    ^ I added the example, but I'm not sure what to add to convey the tropes used int his context, Averted? Subverted? Double Subverted?
  • March 31, 2015
    oneuglybunny
    ^ The way I'm reading the Trope Description, Michael Jordan is the only one playing the game with Isaac Newton physics, while everyone else is playing with Tex Avery physics; this would be a Straight Example, as Jordan is the oddity in a Looney World. It's not until Bugs Bunny points out that, as a guest of Looney World, Jordan is entitled to Tex Avery physics as well. Thus, Jordan can exploit the Beyond The Impossible skills inherent in his milieu.
  • March 31, 2015
    Karxrida
    It sounds like an inversion (MJ is the only one to not have the Cartoon Physics) that gets played with (he gains the ability to abuse them). Or something along those lines.

    Also, I fixed a typo with Weirdness Censor in the draft.
  • April 1, 2015
    DAN004
    ^ cuz you think our physics is always the norm. Not in that case, so Jordan played this trope straight.
  • April 1, 2015
    Snicka
    ^ Since the trope description doesn't define which way the physics work, the Space Jam example is indeed a straight one; however, it's played the other way around this usually is, i.e. the more realistic physics is the exception, while in most examples the less realistic one is.
  • April 1, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    It's been 2 years. Has Pinkie Pie become as iconic as Batman now? :^)

    Serious response: I'll add an addendum to the description that that usual the physics that are the norm are Newtonian physics but that is not always the case
  • April 8, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    Any more examples or problems with the description?
  • April 15, 2015
    Karxrida
    Both anime/manga examples still need to be expanded, but otherwise have my hat.
  • April 15, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    Yeah I still need help expanded these examples...
  • April 21, 2015
    jayoungr
    For Film:

  • April 21, 2015
    SolipSchism
    ^ Being only marginally familiar with the scene (they did an Homage to it on Glee), I think that's more of a Big Lipped Alligator Moment or a Fantasy Sequence, since it's more about the scene and lasts only for a limited amount of time for everyone involved, rather than being a specific character who embodies this trope.

    tl;dr this trope is about a character, not a scene.
  • April 23, 2015
    jayoungr
    Ah, okay—so in other words, a character who does that kind of thing on a regular basis? Might be good to mention that in the trope description to prevent getting other one-time-only reality-breakers when it's launched.
  • April 23, 2015
    SolipSchism
    ^ You just made me realize that this trope has a mild case of Well This Is Not That Trope. The second paragraph is the core of this trope, and should really be the first paragraph. To be honest, the first paragraph can probably be cut and/or moved closer to the end of the description in a "Not to be confused with X" sort of way.
  • April 23, 2015
    DAN004
    ^ technically, the way you used WTINTT is also a misuse. Seen a lot of trope pages using it in the description.
  • April 23, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    I'm considering making a crowner for either cutting or moving the first paragraph later
  • April 24, 2015
    SolipSchism
    ^^ What? WTINTT is when a trope description starts off by describing something that is not the trope, so that it can say "But this trope is when X." It's a trope in its own right, but when it turns up in Wiki writing, it's bad form.
  • April 24, 2015
    DAN004
    ^ that's what I meant.

    I mean, having "trope" in the trope name (when it's not a Trope Trope) is outlawed, and some tropes have their names changed because of it.
  • April 24, 2015
    SolipSchism
    ^ I don't understand what you're getting at.

    The description of this trope is poorly-written because the first paragraph is misleading, due to the fact that it describes something else so that it can turn around and say "So here's what this trope is." Which is an instance of Well This Is Not That Trope and is bad wiki writing. I don't understand what we're disagreeing about.
  • April 24, 2015
    DAN004
    ^ I wanna change the trope's name, that's all.
  • April 24, 2015
    SolipSchism
    Change WTINTT's name?

    Makes sense.

    Actually, do we have an Administrivia page that covers the subject from a wiki-writing standpoint instead of a trope standpoint?
  • April 24, 2015
    oneuglybunny
    Uh-oh, here I go again.

    Film
    • Comic artist Jack Deebs gets pulled into the Toon Town called Cool World by Holli Would. As a human, or "noid" in toon parlance, Jack is a Fish Out Of Water there. However, Jack can do one thing that no "doodle" can do: he can transform a doodle into a noid by having sex with her. Which is precisely why Holli wants him; as a noid, she finally can have orgasms that are real.
  • April 24, 2015
    Karxrida
    ^Not sure if that's an example due to sounding like a general thing humans are allowed to do. Also Cool World is fucking weird.

    Come to think of it, should we allow examples that pertain to an entire race and denizens of a specific plane/universe/whatever traveling to another? Like with the Roger Rabbit example it's not a specific character with those abilities, it's a group of them and it's a power or whatever inherent to them.
  • August 9, 2016
    DAN004
  • August 11, 2016
    Owlivia
    Literature
    • In ''The Reckoners Trilogy, the Epics are often said to completely shatter the laws of physics. The best example is Newton, who can transfer her momentum to other objects and can redirect forces.
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