Created By: TBeholder on January 3, 2010
Troped

CanonApocrypha

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
or Loose Canon

It's not quite in Canon. It's not quite out of Canon. No events of this episode are referenced in Canon, ever, but unlike Big Lipped Alligator Moment it's not just a random throwaway gag: it serves to highlight characters or setting that do belong to Canon. It's not a Canon Discontinuity, because it was not firmly tied into the continuity to begin with, as opposed to being demoted later. May contain Reset Button, Or Is It, Or Was It a Dream? or Perspective Flip for Unreliable Narrator, thus having a weakened link to Canon.

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Community Feedback Replies: 18
  • January 1, 2010
    Tzintzuntzan
    The term "Canon Apocrypha" has a very specific meaning in both Christian and Jewish theology (and some weak Hadith are a similar thing in Muslim tradtion). So assuming we want to keep the metaphor of religious canon to fictional canon, this may need another name.

    Speaking of which, do we have a trope for Apocrypha?
  • January 1, 2010
    Omar Karindu
  • January 1, 2010
    DragonQuestZ
    The Star Wars Holiday Special. It's canon, just that most of the audience, and George Lucas, doesn't want it to be.
  • January 1, 2010
    NatetheGreat
    Star Trek Voyager, "Threshold." Everyone, including the creators, have quietly agreed to pretend that this never happened. We all sort of agree that it did, but we prefer to operate as if it didn't. It's the only way we can sleep at night. (How much of this is truth and how much is hyperbole is up for debate)
  • January 1, 2010
    DragonQuestZ
    ^^ That's just Canon Discontinuity.
  • January 1, 2010
    JackButler
    The entirety of the Star Wars expanded universe is canon to its fan. Of course, to the CREATOR and owner of the property, its no such thing at all. But try telling the fans that. This troper was once told that the canon/non-canon decision simply wasn't up to George Lucas at all.
  • January 1, 2010
    Tannhaeuser
    Actually, there is a term for "things considered canonical by some authorities but not by all" (unlike "Apocrypha," which are rejected by everyone). The term "deuterocanonical" is applied by the Catholic Church to those books of the Old Testament Scriptural canon which it accepts, and Jews and most Protestants do not. (Basically, these are the books of the Old Testament which were written in Greek rather than Hebrew: Tobit, Judith, parts of Esther, Wisdom, Ecclesiasticus, Baruch, The Prayer of Azariah, The Song of the Three Holy Children, Susanna, Bel and the Dragon, and 1 and 2 Maccabees.
  • January 1, 2010
    animeg3282
    The bonus comics in Templar Arizona?
  • January 2, 2010
    BlackMageJ
    The Order Of The Stick comics that appeared in Dragon Magazine might fall into this. In one online strip where Haley mentions Belkar claiming to be a gourmet chef, he responds that it was in Dragon so he's not even sure if it's the same continuity.
  • January 2, 2010
    foxley
    Surely most long running series have episodes that are never mentioned again. If that is all that is required to qualify for this trope, then it is going to be absolutely huge.
  • January 2, 2010
    Stormtroper
    This is canon that's not firmly attached to the rest of canon, right?

    If it is, then how about Loose Canon?
  • January 2, 2010
    JackButler
    Believe it or not, an episode of Saturday Night Live qualifies. The Louise Lasser episode (originally broadcast on July 24, 1976 has been banned by Lorne Michaels from ever being rebroadcast, and thus has been "removed from the canon" of Saturday Night Live. The Milton Berle episode, broadcast originally on April 13, 1979, was banned from rebroadcast until February 2003, when Michaels relented and allowed an edited version to be shown on the E! network.
  • January 2, 2010
    random surfer
    ^^The Louise Lasser SNL is available on the official SNL DVD.
  • January 2, 2010
    Kayube
    Metal Gear Solid Mobile. It hits the Reset Button at the end by erasing Snake's memory so it doesn't interfere with canon. (Though that doesn't explain why Otacon doesn't remember any of the events either...)

    Similarly, the Lost tie-in books and video game aren't canon (except for the Incident Room in the game...) but they don't interfere with canon by involving background characters and just mentioning the canon events as happening elsewhere. (The one trip-up spot here is really the part right before the end of the video game where you have to save Jack and Kate from the Others. There's no reason why that wouldn't come up again in the series...)
  • January 3, 2010
    TBeholder
    Loose Canon sounds good. Launch?
  • January 3, 2010
    foxley
    Can we get a better definition of what this trope actually entails? Is it expanded universe not mentioned anywhere else? An episode never referenced anywhere else (which I think would make this huge)?
  • January 11, 2010
    TBeholder
    Episodes never referenced, that were made as something separate from the main continuity episodes to begin with.
  • January 11, 2010
    foxley
    Thank you. This is clearer to me now. I think the 'seperate from the main continuity episodes to begin with' should be emphasised in the final write-up.
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