Created By: FlipNinten on May 29, 2014 Last Edited By: Arivne on June 6, 2014
Troped

Art Shifted Sequel

When a series undergoes a graphical overhaul in between installments.

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Whether it's because of some significant change in the series (like being released on a new console, or in an Alternate Universe), or just the designers wanting something different, occasionally the art style of a series may change for a sequel. Then, in some cases, the new art style may become the default art style.

This trope is for when the previously used art style in a series is switched in a sequel. This can invoke They Changed It, Now It Sucks, if the change of style is unwelcome by fans of the original work. Note, that if a series continues to use one style for too long, some fans might complain that It's the Same, Now It Sucks.

A Sister Trope of Art Shift, which is a change of visual style within a work. Compare Video Game 3D Leap, when a franchise's visuals change from 2D to 3D.

Video game sequels and remakes being made for games on older console generations would most likely get an Art Shift to take advantage of the new hardware, although there are exceptions.


Examples

Anime and Manga
  • The first season of Beyblade was animated by Madhouse, while the next two and the movie were done by Nihon Animedia in a style closer to the manga. The franchise would retain this style into Metal Fight Beyblade, where animation was handed off to Tatsunoko and SynergySP, along with the Nelvana-commissioned BeyWarriors series.
  • Lupin III: With four series to date, and dozens of TV specials, it is inevitable that this work would become an example of this trope.
    • Lupin III (Green Jacket) has thick lines, and a dark colour palette with high saturation.
    • Lupin III (Red Jacket) used thinner lines, and rounder shapes. The colour palette was much lighter this time, with lower saturation.
    • Lupin III (Pink Jacket) was somewhere between the two in terms of saturation, using a mix of bright and medium colours. The shapes were often very curvy, especially in the first few episodes. Except for one movie, the animation style used here is never repeated.
    • For several decades, the Lupin III Yearly Specials would draw elements mostly from the "Red Jacket" series, with updated colour palettes and techniques, every year. This style is still in use.
    • The release of Lupin III: The Woman Called Fujiko Mine brought the franchise to a new style, one inspired by the original "Green Jacket" series, with darker lines, multiple Art Shifts, and a tendency for more lines, as well. This style is still in use.

Film - Animated

Video Games

Western Animation
  • The second season of American Dragon: Jake Long saw a number of character redesigns. The overall style was much more sketchy and the designs of several reoccurring characters had them thinner with more cartoony embellishments. To the point many of them would be unrecognizable if they hadn't been mentioned by name on screen. Sliver the Mermaid goes from being able to pass a brunette human from the waste up to being completely green. The Oracle Twins go from being identical besides their clothing style and level of perkiness to having different faces and hair colors. Even the title character's dragon form changes from a Western style dragon his friends could easily ride on, to an Eastern style dragon that was skinner and more mobile in the air.
  • The New Batman Adventures saw a number of changes in art style from Batman: The Animated Series in order for the art to more closely fit with the art style of Superman: The Animated Series to allow for crossovers (and the eventual Justice League show). The color scheme was inked darker, but the former film noir influenced style was completely done away with. The lines became much more streamlined and everyone had a character redesign.

Community Feedback Replies: 31
  • May 29, 2014
    ZuTheSkunk
    Compare Video Game 3 D Leap, where a game series that was previously in 2D gets a new installment in 3D.

    • A minor one between Rayman Origins and Rayman Legends: in the former, the characters had a more cartoony style with flat colors and clearly visible outlines, but in the latter it gets replaced with a more painted look.
  • May 30, 2014
    Arivne
    • Added blank line(s) for readability.
    • Examples section formatting
      • Media section title(s): changed double curly braces to Wiki Word(s).
      • Added a space between *'s and the first word following them.
    • Namespaced and italicized work name(s).
  • May 30, 2014
    Snicka
    It's not necessarily a video game trope, is it? It could also work when, for example, a 2D animated film gets a 3D animated sequel, right?
  • May 30, 2014
    Koveras
    ^ I would say so, but I'm not the OP.

    This must be a subtrope of Art Shift, which hasn't been mentioned yet.

    • The Dragon Age series had a major art overhaul between Dragon Age Origins—which was pretty standard fare Medieval Fantasy style—to Dragon Age II—whose visuals are highly stylized, particularly in regards to the depiction of elves and the Qunari. The series backpedaled on the stylization a bit with Dragon Age Inquisition, which tries to find the middle ground between the first two games' styles—this overhaul was also partly a consequence of moving to a different Game Engine.
  • May 30, 2014
    FlipNinten
    ^^ Yeah, it could work for animated films as well.

    ^ I suppose it is a subtrope. I'll be sure to add that.
  • May 30, 2014
    Diask
    • Jumper Three features stylized retraux graphics in contrast to MS Paintish graphics of previous installments or 16-bit style of Jumper Redux.
  • May 30, 2014
    NihonjinronGakusei
    Super Mario World and Super Mario World 2 Yoshis Island have completely different art styles. While the former is based on simple sprites made from ordinary shapes and vibrant colors, the latter uses a much more washed out color palette, with complex and unconventional shapes. In general, the latter looks more "hand-drawn" with crayons while the former appears stenciled and computer-colored.
  • May 31, 2014
    Snicka
    This can invoke They Changed It Now It Sucks, if the Art Shift is unwelcome by fans of the original work.

  • May 31, 2014
    FGHIK
    Team Fortress 2 was completely different in art style from team fortress classic and early developmental versions.
  • May 31, 2014
    crazysamaritan
    Can't be a sub trope: Art Shift is specifically a trope that occurs during an installment, not between.
  • May 31, 2014
    KarjamP
    Super Mario World 2 Yoshis Island is actually a subversion, as it's not meant to be a sequel in the original Japanese to begin with (as evident with the fact that it's called "Super Mario: Yossy Island" in Japan, with "Yossy" being an alternate spelling of Yoshi within that country.)

    (Yeah, I know this is verbose, but this'll have to do unless you can figure out how to make it smaller without turning it into a Zero Context Example.
  • May 31, 2014
    crazysamaritan
    Make each example a separate bullet: Example Indentation In Trope Lists.
  • May 31, 2014
    Snicka
    ^^^ It's a Sister Trope then.
  • May 31, 2014
    TheTitan99
    Alright, the Zelda example isn't well done. Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask themselves already were art shifts from previous Zelda games, and, on top of that, Ocarina of Time is far, far from realistic. Maybe a little more realistic than Wind Waker, but still very animated looking. And, the series has had several art shifts since, with Twilight Princess changing the art style back more to Ocarina of Time, and Skyward Sword changing that again to a semi-Impressionistic look.

    I'm not sure how you all want this to be formatted. Simply saying that the series frequently changes art styles, or listing each major art change as its own bullet?
  • May 31, 2014
    Alucard
    The first season of Beyblade was animated by Madhouse, while the next two and the movie were done by Nihon Animedia in a style closer to the manga. The franchise would retain this style into Metal Fight Beyblade, where animation was handed off to Tatsunoko and SynergySP, along with the Nelvana-commissioned BeyWarriors series.
  • May 31, 2014
    needsanewhobby
    ^^^^^^ Incidentally Art Shift is suffering plenty of misuse on both the trope page page and its wicks when examples would be better off here. Maybe you can mine that page for examples.

    Also, I'm presuming this could, at least in theory, apply to animation as well as video games?
  • June 1, 2014
    Snicka
    ^ Yeah, we discussed it in the above comments, it can be applied to animation too.
  • June 1, 2014
    FlipNinten
    ^^ Yeah, I've noticed the misuse as well. I might have to look around on that page.
  • June 1, 2014
    KarjamP

    Incidentally, is sounds to me like Video Game 3 D Leap is actually a subtrope of this one, especially if the core gameplay remains the same (ala Two And A Half D).
  • June 2, 2014
    Folamh3
  • June 2, 2014
    Snicka
    The last line of the description should say, for clarity:

    "A Sister Trope of Art Shift, which is a change of visual style within a work."

    Also, there is a misuse of Art Shift in the description as well (my mistake, in fact): "This can invoke They Changed It Now It Sucks...". Please replace Art Shift with a non-potholed term, such as "change of style".
  • June 3, 2014
    crazysamaritan
    • Lupin III: With four series to date, and dozens of tv specials, it is inevitable that this work would become an example of this trope.
      • Lupin III Green Jacket has thick lines, and a dark colour palette with high saturation.
      • Lupin III Red Jacket used thinner lines, and rounder shapes. The colour palette was much lighter this time, with lower saturation.
      • Lupin III Pink Jacket was somewhere between the two in terms of saturation, using a mix of bright and medium colours. The shapes were often very curvy, especially in the first few episodes. Except for one movie, the animation style used here is never repeated.
      • For several decades, the Lupin III Yearly Specials would draw elements mostly from the "Red Jacket" series, with updated colour palettes and techniques, every year. This style is still in use.
      • The release of Lupin III The Woman Called Fujiko Mine brought the franchise to a new style, one inspired by the original "Green Jacket" series, with darker lines, multiple Art Shifts, and a tendency for more lines, as well. This style is still in use.
  • June 3, 2014
    paycheckgurl
    • The second season of American Dragon Jake Long saw a number of character redesigns. The overall style was much more sketchy and the designs of several reoccurring characters had them thinner with more cartoony embellishments. To the point many of them would be unrecognizable if they hadn't been mentioned by name on screen. Sliver the Mermaid goes from being able to pass a brunette human from the waste up to being completely green. The Oracle Twins go from being identical besides their clothing style and level of perkiness to having different faces and hair colors. Even the title character's dragon form changes from a Western style dragon his friends could easily ride on, to an Eastern style dragon that was skinner and more mobile in the air.
    • The New Batman Adventures saw a number of changes in art style from Batman The Animated Series in order for the art to more closely fit with the art style of Superman The Animated Series to allow for crossovers (and the eventual Justice League show). The color scheme was inked darker, but the former film noir influenced style was completely done away with. The lines became much more streamlined and everyone had a character redesign.
  • June 4, 2014
    Snicka
    Is there any reason why the example I suggested (Vuk The Little Fox) isn't among the examples yet? Does it lack some context, or do you think it doesn't fit for whatever reason?
  • June 4, 2014
    FlipNinten
    ^ Sorry, I must have missed that one. It should be added now.
  • June 4, 2014
    Snicka
    ^ No worries. :) It should be sorted under Film Animated rather than Western Animation (it's a full-length feature animation, and it's debated whether Hungarian animation counts as Western Animation or Eastern European Animation).
  • June 5, 2014
    Chabal2
    Out of all Blizzard's strategy games, only the first two War Craft games look like each other, with III having made the jump to 3D. Interestingly, Starcraft originally looked a lot more like Warcraft II. This changed after the dev team saw a much better made game using Isometric Projection, giving it this look (and twelve years later, Starcraft II).
  • June 5, 2014
    Arivne
    • Added blank line(s) for readability.
    • Deleted unnecessary blank line(s). You don't need a blank line between each example.
    • Examples section formatting
      • Media section title(s): Changed to our standard style.
      • Added an asterisk at the beginning of example(s) to indent them.
    • Capitalized (tv).
    • Namespaced and italicized work name(s).
    • Moved the following to the Description as per How To Write An Example - Keep it an example. Examples are about instances of a trope in a specific work, not blanket statements.
      • "Video game sequels and remakes being made for games on older console generations would most likely get an Art Shift to take advantage of the new hardware, although there are exceptions."
    • Removed unnecessary double curly braces in work name(s).
  • June 5, 2014
    FlipNinten
    ^ Alright. Thanks for the improvements.
  • June 5, 2014
    KarjamP

  • June 6, 2014
    FlipNinten
    ^ Wasn't this added already?

Three days must pass before this YKTTW is Launchworthy or Discardable

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=szgce2gpcbw19rrie9jradpz&trope=ArtShiftedSequel