Created By: neoYTPism on May 20, 2011 Last Edited By: neoYTPism on July 29, 2012

Toying With Dreams By Toying With Senses

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Trope
Do We Have This One?? Oh, and I'm open to title suggestions.

This is when messing with the senses (touch, taste, smell, sound, and maybe sight, depending on how it is approached) of someone who is asleep carries over into their dreams in a way the dreamer's subconscious comes up with.

Examples:

  • The image from Calvin and Hobbes, of course.
  • Inception features several examples.
    • Arthur "dunking" Cobb in water makes Cobb dream that water is splashing in through the windows before he wakes up.
    • Yusuf's driving involves making sharp turns, or driving off a bridge, which leaves the dream subjects with the impression in the former case that gravity is changing direction, or in the latter case that gravity is disappearing altogether.
As mentioned by cracked Don Rosa did Inception first and used the goose egg nugget to fool his sense of smell to get Scrooge to dream of his days as the King of the Klondike (The Story can be found here)
Community Feedback Replies: 15
  • May 20, 2011
    Kayube
    I'm pretty sure this is called Crashing Dreams.
  • May 21, 2011
    neoYTPism
    ^ That seems to imply waking people up. This does not.
  • May 21, 2011
    ArtyMorty
    As mentioned by cracked Don Rosa did Inception first and used the goose egg nugget to fool his sense of smell to get Scrooge to dream of his days as the King of the Klondike (The Story can be found here)
  • May 24, 2011
    Aielyn
    How about Sense-Guided Dreaming? Extra points if it's used to also guide a sleep-walker's walking.
  • May 24, 2011
    randomsurfer
    The Simpsons: Bart has a dream where he wins the Science Fair. The end of the dream is Principal Skinner going "First prize! First prize! First prize!" Then he wakes up only to discover that Lisa is standing over him going "First prize! First prize! First prize!"
    Bart: Why are you saying that?
    Lisa: Just screwing with your mind. laughs and runs off
  • May 25, 2011
    Aielyn
    randomsurfer - that's Crashing Dreams, which is subtly different. Basically, the distinction is that Crashing Dreams involves seeing from the perspective of the dreamer, where they start to experience within the dream something happening outside, and then they wake up to discover that that particular thing wasn't just part of the dream. This trope, however, is where we see from outside the dreamer's perspective, and the dreamer remains asleep, just reacting to the input as though it's part of their dream, or where we see the influence first, then see the impact on their dreams.
  • May 25, 2011
    jaytee
    I call Ridiculously Similar Tropes. Even if they aren't, the Inception example clearly falls under Crashing Dreams.

    I would rework the description of Crashing Dreams (eliminating the bit about the character having to wake up to note the dream/real-life parallels... as long as anyone, audience included, can see the parallels, it should be enough) first, and then see if we really need this trope.
  • May 25, 2011
    Aielyn
    But you can't always see the parallels. See the image provided - Hobbes is dreaming, and Calvin messes with his dream... but you don't see it from Hobbes' perspective. It's not uncommon, especially in TV shows where the character reacting while asleep is part of the comedy.
  • May 26, 2011
    neoYTPism
    Crashing Dreams, from its description, seems to involve said interference waking people up. This does not, making this a supertrope to Crashing Dreams.
  • May 26, 2011
    jaytee
    ^^So it's an example of Crashing Dreams being implied rather than being explicit about it.

    ^Like I said, all that is required is removing the phrase about waking up. Waking isn't really needed for the trope, it's just one of the most common ways of ivoking the trope.

    On the other hand...

    I can see this working if we cut out the references to dreams. Since this trope takes place from the POV of someone awake, it's really not necessary that the other party be dreaming per se. It could include the common prank of putting your sleeping friend's hand in warm water to make them pee.
  • May 26, 2011
    PapercutChainsaw
    ^Could also extend to trying get someone to talk in their sleep to reveal some information, or, if they're sleepwalking, to do something in particular (eg if you want them to sign a contract, you tell them they've won the lottery and it's a cheque for a million dollars.)
  • May 26, 2011
    Aielyn
    Well then, if this is where the trope will go, then I'd suggest Leading The Subconscious, which would cover not just cases with dreaming, but also cases such as influencing what someone does while under the influence of, say, strong drugs, or (as I've seen a few times in Disney and Warner Bros cartoons) highly out-of-it due to being hit in the head or caught in an explosion, etc. Whenever it involves making someone do something when they're practically unconscious should be covered.
  • August 1, 2011
    Aielyn
    Can I take it that this trope is Up For Grabs? It hasn't been active for over two months.
  • August 1, 2011
    madelinemary
    On an episode of That70s Show Jackie does this to try to get a sleeping Kelso to admit that he doesn't think their relationship will work out.
  • July 29, 2012
    ShiningArmor87
    • The entire point of Paige's Pierre dreams in Fox Trot. Some examples are Jason and Marcus lassoing her repeatedly being transferred as Pierre putting pearl necklaces on her, Andy splashing cold water on her face transferred as them riding on dolphins, or Andy dragging her off the couch as the two dancing.
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