Created By: ArtFever on January 13, 2013 Last Edited By: Lakija on November 9, 2013

Dreadful Diva Demands

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Trope
Some celebrities are downright insufferable. It's as if their sole purpose is to make everyone's life around them utterly miserable. One of their favorite ways to express this intense loathing is by bossing around their subordinates. Enter the Dreadful Diva Demands.

This trope originates from real life, -Text needed here to further explain origin-

The Diva will make unreasonable demands, such as wanting very particularly prepared meals, custom furniture in dressing rooms, pet care on sets, ridiculous security measures, sorted candies and snacks, and even custom toilets and plumbing on every venue.

The most common demand is a bowl of candy (usually M&M's), only with either one color removed, all of the same color, or the colors sorted in separate bowls. This particular variant was inspired by Van Halen, whose concert rider actually did demand a bowl of M&M's (with the brown ones removed) in the band's dressing room—except this demand for M&M's was actually a Secret Test (see Real Life section for more detail).

That Other Wiki has a page on this.

Examples

Film - Animated

Film - Live Action

Live Action TV
  • In an episode of Lizzie McGuire, Lizzie becomes a model and soon wants out of it, due to her friends treating her differently. To prove this, she acts like a diva and demands jelly beans. Once she gets them, she then says to pick out the green ones.

Newspaper Comics
  • In one strip of Pearls Before Swine, Rat demands that his dressing room be filled with M&M's - but no red ones.
Rat: (...) I hate the red ones.

Real Life
  • Van Halen's concert rider—demanding a bowl of M&M's (sans the brown ones) in the dressing room—earned them some infamy. What's less known is that the M&M's were a Secret Test: the concert rider had a lot details regarding stage setup, sound equipment, lighting, etc., which had to be followed to the letter to insure the concert happened safely and without complications. If the requested bowl of M&M's wasn't in the band's dressing room, that tipped them off that the venue hadn't followed their other specifications, so their road crew would go double-check everything.
Community Feedback Replies: 36
  • January 13, 2013
    ArtFever
    Note that I went with Skittles in the title instead of M&M's to avoid the annoying punctuation. Also, I could have sworn I knew more examples but these are the only ones I can remember at the moment.
  • January 13, 2013
    Omeganian
    With Van Halen, it's actually a way of determining whether the hosts are taking their duties seriously.
  • January 13, 2013
    FantasyLiver
    In The Ant Bully, one of the ants only eats red jellybeans.
  • January 13, 2013
    peccantis
    They could also demand that the colours are sorted in separate bowls.

    "Rock group Van Halen demanded that all their brown M&M's be removed from the bowls in their dressing room. " is not an example (unless the band wanted to invoke the trope) but mentioning that the trope has basis on IRL rider lists.
  • January 13, 2013
    LadyJuse
    In an episode of Lizzie Mc Guire, Lizzie becomes a model and soon wants out of it, due to her friends treating her differently. To prove this, she acts like a diva and demands jelly beans. Once she gets them, she then says to pick out the green ones.
  • January 13, 2013
    robinjohnson
    • The roadie in Wayne's World 2 has an anecdote about Ozzy Osborne demanding 2,000 brown M&M's in a brandy glass, which he tells so often that by the end of the film, the main characters are mouthing it along with him.
  • January 13, 2013
    rodneyAnonymous
    The punctuation would be made correct by a custom title. Skittles actually have slightly different flavors in different colors, even if they all taste the same after a few, so that is remotely rational. "No Red M&Ms" is better.
  • January 13, 2013
    Chernoskill
    • In American History X, a fat neo nazi grabs a big bowl of jelly beans and proceeds to pick every black one out before raising the bowl and pouring the whole rest into his mouth at once.
  • January 13, 2013
    oneuglybunny
    From S1m0ne by New Line Cinema in 2002, Al Pacino is a movie director who must eliminate the red candies from a bowlful of them to please the temperamental actress played by Winona Ryder.
  • January 14, 2013
    peccantis
  • January 14, 2013
    ArtFever
    I've made some heavy changes to the trope so that it now encompasses all kinds of ridiculous demands. I need some help with parts of the text though, and we should probably look through the Character Flaw Index for examples of the kind of people that would demand these things.
  • January 14, 2013
    peccantis

    Do we have a supertrope for Fame Abuser?

    Also anyone making these demands is likely to also be an Entitled Bastard.
  • January 14, 2013
    rodneyAnonymous
    "Divalicious" is relatively recent slang, an amalgam of "diva" and "delicious". Odds of any given reader "getting" that: low. You might even have to Google the word, after having read the article, for the name to make sense.

    No Red M&Ms... odds of any given reader "getting" that: high. At worst you'd have to read the article for the name to make sense. No looking-up-words.

    The first name (No Red M&Ms) was good. The two changes (to No Red Skittles and Divaliciuos Rider List) have been progressively worse.
  • January 14, 2013
    NotSoBadassLongcoat
    How about Dreadful Diva Demands, then?
  • January 14, 2013
    rodneyAnonymous
    It's... okay. But what's wrong with No Red M&Ms? That seems way better to me.
  • January 15, 2013
    robinjohnson
    No Red M&Ms makes it pretty clear that someone doesn't want red M&M's, and is evocative of the picky-band-dressing-room story for those that know it. Of the three words in "Divalicious Rider List", two are actual words, none appear to have anything to do with each other, and none mean being fussy about candy in your dressing room. [Edit: I've now looked up what "rider" means in this context - apologies if I was projecting my ignorance onto everyone, but I still think it's showbiz jargon that's not commonly understood enough to be clear.] And most to all of the examples are about candy in dressing rooms. (Brown M&M's is more fitting with the commonly-ish known story/myth, though.)

    Edit: I quite like Dreadful Diva Demands if the trope is going to be generalised (and we don't have that already?)
  • January 15, 2013
    peccantis
    DDD is verra nice.
  • January 18, 2013
    dvorak
    would demanding peeled grapes count?
  • January 18, 2013
    Chabal2
    Tintin: overlapping with Pity The Kidnapper in Picaros, the imprisoned Bianca Castafiore demands that the prison serve her pasta al dente, sending back the guard wearing the offending pasta around his head. In Jewels, where she stays at Marlinspike, she's far more subdued (though in that case, she has her pianist and chambermaid, who presumably cushion things a bit).
  • November 3, 2013
    LeonEmbers
    Parodied in Family Guy, when Brian becomes a successful writer and takes Stewie on as an assistant, he points out that he wanted "no grey M&Ms". Brain is a dog, and therefore color-blind.
  • November 3, 2013
    DRCEQ
    ^ Darnit, I came in here to add that example.

    Adding onto that example though:

    • Brian later makes a ridiculous demand to ensure that he isn't seated next to any Asian people on his next flight. Not only was his arrival delayed, but he sneered at Stewie because he ended up sitting next to a Japanese man the whole flight, as if expecting Stewie to have the power to ensure that wouldn't happen.

    Adding onto the real life example:

    • Many performers are actually very nice and reasonable people in real life, especially if they've grown past a point in their careers where the fame goes to their head. Seeing such obscure demands fulfilled in their contract actually shows that the venue organizers can be trusted, and usually pays them back for going out of their way to set up everything just perfectly.
  • November 3, 2013
    Bisected8
    • Blue Peter once had a segment where a child with some sort of talent would be featured on the show and be allowed to make one "Unreasonable" demand, in the spirit of this trope (e.g. jam sandwiches cut into perfect stars).
  • November 7, 2013
    AgProv
    Real Life Web Comics
    • Straddling two categories, Humon, creator of Scandinavia And The World, ruefully revealed that when she is invited to comic conventions as a Creator, a split personality emerges that can turn a normally pleasant, considerate, likeable, Danish girl who just happens to draw comics, into a monster she calls Diva Humon. She has actually drawn an occassional comic series featuring the imperious and self-centred Diva Humon... see illustration on page Humon. Cartoon story here
  • November 7, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    name has nothing to do with trope. what does being a diva have to do with being Picky About Her Candy?
  • November 7, 2013
    Generality
    Incidentally, there is some justification for avoiding red M&Ms. They are dyed with carmine, made from the cochineal insect. Aside from the squick factor of eating insects, they are often shunned in the dietary restrictions of the Muslim and Jewish faiths.
  • November 8, 2013
    NoirGrimoir
    I think Demanding Diva is a better title. The definition for this trope seems to be:

    A character who is famous, usually a rock star, is shown making ludicrously specific, ridiculous, or over the top demands, to emphasize how much power the character's fame has given them, as well as how much it has gone to their heads and made them cruel, eccentric, or paranoid.
  • November 8, 2013
    Snicka
    Web Comics:

    • Senna, the Brazilian supermodel in the first few strips of Sandra On The Rocks demands her assistant Sandra to bring her a Guaraná Antarctica. When Sandra finally gets the drink after several attempts, Senna says she actually wanted Guaraná Antarctica Ice.
  • November 8, 2013
    Arivne
    Seconding Demanding Diva.
  • November 8, 2013
    DAN004
    ^ Thirding that
  • November 8, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    Noir Grimoire, if that's the definition, then this is The Prima Donna.
  • November 8, 2013
    NoirGrimoir
    Not really, The Prima Donna is a character type. It's a character who is selfish, narcissistic, and thinks the world of themselves and therefore always has to be in the spotlight. A Prima Donna can be a Demanding Diva, but it's not necessary.

    Demanding Diva isn't a character trope. It's an action trope. A Character makes over-the-top demands, which shows the audience the character's personality.
  • November 8, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    then there's absolutely no reason to make the name sound like a character trope.

    in short, cut the "diva" part.
  • November 9, 2013
    Snicka
    I think the current trope name ("Dreadful Diva Demands") is better than the suggested Demanding Diva, because the latter sounds like a character trope. This is about the action, the spoiled character is giving absurdly specific orders.
  • November 9, 2013
    Earnest
  • November 9, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    ^^ then Primadonna Demands works better due to having an established term referring to a demanding character.
  • November 9, 2013
    Snicka
    ^ That is also a good name.
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