Step Into The Blinding Fight
The tactical use of blinding your enemy to shroud ones attacks.
Needs Examples Better Name

(permanent link) added: 2013-03-18 21:09:03 sponsor: thewriter (last reply: 2013-03-27 17:26:49)

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The enemy uses magic or technology to shut off, put out, or destroy light sources, thus pitching an area in darkness. Sometimes a character literally summons darkness or a mist or fog with magic or superpowers in order to invoke this. For the most disturbing applications, the hero's eyes are damaged, or worst yet: removed. In any case, this trope is when one character cannot view another character as they fight. From one direction a punch flies and hits their left cheek. From another direction a kick slams into their rightknee. Uppercut to the chin; knee to the gut; roundhouse kick to the back. The hero gets his ass kicked.

If the method of blinding an enemy is to throw sand, a chemical, or some other foreign substance into their eye, than that's A Handful for an Eye, a subtrope of this one.

Often invoked by the blind master to teach his pupil to not rely so much on his visual senses .A frequent occurrence in the Stealth-Based Game genre, as well as many video games with a stealth mechanic and a specialty of the ninja.

Eye Scream Warning: Potential for Squick and Nightmare Fuel abounds.

Examples:

Anime/Manga
  • One Piece - Absalom uses this against Sanji while the latter tries to protect an unconscious Nami.
  • In Naruto one forbidden ninjutsu that the Second Hokage uses on the Third causes darkness that blinds the target.
  • Also in Fullmetal Alchemist there's a fight scene in the dark that renders the heroes unable to fight very well. Gluttony solves the problem by using his sense of Smell
  • Captain Tousen in Bleach uses this. His bankai creates a huge sphere of darkness (in which his blindness doesn't give him a disadvantage). Unfortunately for him, he was fighting Kenpachi, who just lets himself get stabbed to immobilize Tousen's sword and beat the crap out of him.
Comic Books
  • Often invoked by Batman with his use of shadows and smoke pellets to scare criminals. It disorients his enemies and make them easier to pick off one by one. In The Dark Knight Rises Bane was a member of the League Of Shadows and knows of their tricks of using darkness to distract enemies in battle, so when Batman tries to use these same tactics on Bane, he mocks him for it and goes into a Badass Boast about how he is made of Shadows.
  • Daredevil invokes this trope despite being blind himself. His superb hearing and "radar" senses allows him to "see" in the dark much to the disadvantage of the criminals who can actually see. While they're paranoid and distracted he's calm and controlled and kicks their asses.
    • Turned on its head though any time his superior senses are overloaded, such as when in the movie Bullseye causes a raucous of noise and disorients Daredevil thus making him "blind" to any attack Bullseye can impose on him.
Film
  • In the climax of Wait Until Dark a blind woman battles against a killer in her apartment; she destroys all the lamps so he is disoriented but she can react just fine.
  • The Silence of the Lambs: Jame Gumb turns off the lights and stalks Agent Starling while wearing night-vision goggles.
  • There's a scene in The Chronicles of Riddick where Riddick is accosted by two necromongers, and responds by extinguishing the two candles in the room, plunging it into darkness. Riddick has the ability to see in the dark thanks to his 'eye-shine'. The necromongers don't, and get completely owned in the fight that follows.
  • The Golden Voyage of Sinbad. At the end Sinbad must fight Koura while Koura is invisible after being granted a "shield of darkness".
  • In one of the Star Wars movies, Jedis train The Younglings to fight blind/using only the Force by using the special darkness helmets.
Live-Action Television
  • Inverted in an episode of Angel where a blind assassin can sense motion including heartbeats and breath-falls. Angel, being a vampire lacks both a pulse and the necessity to inhale or exhale, so when he stands completely still, the assassin is incapable of seeing him.
  • An episode of Grimm had a fly Wesen capable of spewing a certain parasite into his victims' eyes which blinded them (and after a while the parasites would completely eat out their eyes). After he blinds Nick, the Wesen later tries to use this to his advantage in an attack, but Nick's developed enhanced hearing and ends up winning.
  • Justified by the weeping angels in Doctor Who; they become 'quantum-locked' and completely incapable of moving when being observed by other living things, so they've developed abilities that let them drain power from light sources when in statue-form, making it easier to approach their prey.
Literature
  • The Blind Master Training occurs in a book of the Pendragon series. Bobby is blindfolded and asked to feel his trainers' presences.
Video Games Western Animation
  • For Robin in an episode of Teen Titans he went on a quest and one of the trials was to fight a blind snake in his own element, a dark cave with zero light. He eventually has to learn to try and stop seeing his enemy and start hearing and feeling where the master is.
  • Cleverly used in the Samurai Jack episode "Samurai Vs Ninja": Jack matches an assassin's mastery of the dark by using identical tactics, only wearing stark white and hidden in the glare of sunlight.
Webcomic
  • In WebcomicGoblins, Thaco attempts to exploit the fact that he can see in the dark by luring Dellyn into a sewer before fighting him, and blocking off all the manholes so the sewer is pitch black. Dellyn, however, subverts this by casting a spell that provides him with a light source, rendering Thaco's advantage moot.

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