Created By: justanotherrandomlurker on June 1, 2013 Last Edited By: justanotherrandomlurker on July 21, 2013
Troped

The Law Firm of Pun, Pun, and Wordplay

The names in a law firm's name are a joke

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Trope
You're faced with a mounting problem or situation, and are in need of legal assistance... luckily, there's a well reputable, and established law firm nearby!

In Real Life, law firms are most often represented by multiple individuals (lawyers, attorneys, associates, et al.), sometimes upwards of three of more; when it comes to fiction, it's essentially the same concept, but the major difference is that more often than not, the names of those representing said law firm are played for laughs. It is also not an uncommon occurence for punny names to be utilized.

Some common variants are:

  • The firm consists of a two or more names that seem relevant to each other, followed by a name that seems oddly out of place (example: The Law Offices of Swindler, Backstabber, Bloodsucker, and Bob).
  • The names of those representing the firm are basically a Shout-Out to a celebrity or otherwise well-known person who is identified by his/her full name (example: The Law Firm of Robert, Louis, and Stevenson).
  • The firm is represented by an exceedingly large number of individuals.
  • The firm appears to be represented by nepotism, or individuals that just happen to share the same last name.

The trope codifier is "Dewey, Cheatam and Howe", which in and of itself has also been used in fiction, and still gets some mileage, even to this day.

Examples:

Advertising
  • In Capitol One's latest commercial featuring their viking spokesmen, a viking named Boris, and their goat establish their new lawfirm: Boris, Boris, and Goat, Law Offices.

Comic Book
  • Captain Carrot and the Final Ark featured a lawyer from Dewey, Cheatem and Howe.
    Pig Iron: That's a very old joke.
    Lawyer: We're a very old law firm.
  • Lucky Luke has the Chester, Chester, Chester & Chester law firm. When he's asked which one he has an appointment with, he replies "the last one, I think".
  • She-Hulk used to work for the law firm of Goodman, Lieber, Kurtzberg, & Holliway. The first three are Mythology Gag names relating to Marvel Comics founder Martin Goodman, Stan Lee (Leiber), and Jack Kirby (Kurtzberg). Of the senior partners, Holliway was the only one we ever saw.

Film
  • Super Mario Bros.: King Koopa passes himself off as a lawyer when he first introduces himself to the Mario Bros; "I'm Larry Lazard, of Lazard, Lazard, Conda, Dactile... and Cohen..."
  • The 2012 Three Stooges film had Larry and Curly looking for a lawyer; on the floor of the building they were looking in, they see a variety of punny tenants' names such as "Proba, Keister & Wince, Proctologists" before arriving at the law offices of "Kickem, Harter & Indagroyne".

Literature

Live Action TV
  • During a segment featuring odd billboards, signs, and other such things on America's Funniest Home Videos, one video showed the sign for a law firm, whose names actually were Dewey, Cheatum, and Howe.
  • In the Buffyverse, the Wolf, Ram and Hart are a trio of powerful demons. In Angel, they are fronted by a Legitimate Attorneys' Law Firm named Wolfram & Hart.
  • A subplot in the fourth season of Arrested Development involves the law firm of Feinstein, Feinstein, Feinstein, and Feinstein.
  • Green Acres: As is established in the pilot episode, Oliver originally served as an associate for the Law Offices of Felton, O'Connell, Clay, Blakely, Harmon, Dillon, and Paster.
  • Hee Haw had Cletus Biggs of "Biggs, Shy & Stir", Kornfield Kounty's most honorable law firm".
  • The original version of The Planets Funniest Animals parodied this in one episode, when segment featured a fake informercial, for a law firm, aimed at pets: the Law Firm of Charles, Nelson, and Reilly.
  • 30 Rock: Tracy hires a lawyer from Dewey, Cheatum and Livingson.
  • In season 2 of The Wire, a prank involving a paternity lawsuit involves a telephone call from "Shyster, Shyster & Shyster"
  • World's Dumbest... plays with this when John Enos once does a fake informercial for his own law firm: the Law Firm of Enos, Enos, and Enos.
    • In another episode, we're treated to a clip of an intoxicated motorist ranting in the backseat of a cruisier, inflicting harm on himself, and threatening legal action against the officer, mentioning his attorney known as Gilleto. Cue the cast putting on a fake informercial for the Law Offices of Gilleto, Gilleto, and Gilleto.

Magazines
  • Private Eye often refers to Messrs Sue, Grabbit & Runne.
    • Also, the New York-based Shyster, Shyster & Kruk has been mentioned at least once.

Radio
  • In one episode of Adventures in Odyssey, Edwin Blackgard is visited by a lawyer from the firm: Dunkey, Dunkey, Dunkey, and McCormic.
  • On Car Talk, the hosts reference a fake lawfirm by the name of Dewey, Cheatam, and Howe at least once per show.
  • Groucho & Chico's radio show Flywheel, Shyster & Flywheel was originally called Beagle, Shyster & Beagle but an attorny actually named Beagle threatened to sue so Beagle "went back to his maiden name" Flywheel. (Both Beagles, and both Flywheels, in the company name are Groucho. We never meet Shyster.)
  • In one episode of Old Harry's Game, Satan pretends to be a lawyer from the firm of Bulstrode, Bulstrode and Thirdname.

Theatre
  • In Animal Crackers Captain Spaulding dictates a letter to the law firm of Hungerdunger, Hungerdunger, Hungerdunger, Hungerdunger, and McCormick. At one point he has his secretary read back to him what he's written thus far:
    Jamison: "Honorable Charles H. Hungadunga..."
    Capt. Spaulding: Hungerdunger. Hoong.
    Jamison: Hungerdunger.
    Capt. Spaulding: That's it, Hungerdunger.
    Jamison: [continues reading] "... care of Hungerdunger, Hungerdunger, Hungerdunger, and McCormick."
    Capt. Spaulding: You've left out a Hungerdunger. You left out the main one, too. Thought you could slip one over on me, didn't you, eh?
  • The Importance of Being Earnest makes passing mention of a law firm called Markby, Markby and Markby. Lady Bracknell comments that the Markbys are held in high esteem for their profession - one of them is even occasionally invited to dinner parties.

Video Games

Web Original

Western Animation
  • The Simpsons episode "Bart the Fink" features the lawfirm of Dewey, Cheatham, Howe and Weissman.
    • In "Black Eyes, Please", Ned wants Homer to punch him in the eye as retribution from Ned punching him earlier, and this exchange occurs.
    Ned: Homer, if you punch me, we'll be even according to Exodus, Leviticus and Matthew.
    Homer: So you hired a lawfirm, eh?
  • Spongebob Squarepants: Law firm is Curly, Combover, and Bald. And yes, the guys actually have these hairstyles

Real Life
  • An old joke about Ted Kennedy being defended in the Chappaquidick incident by the infamous law firm of "Winer, Diner, Dicker and Dunker".


Community Feedback Replies: 79
  • June 1, 2013
    Melkior
    I've seen another version, which is basically type 1 without the final (normal) name. eg "Robbem, Fleecem & Runn", "Hoodwink, Trickem & Lye" etc. Disney comics were very fond of doing this. I'll see if I can find a few examples, if it looks like this YKTTW is heading for tropehood.
  • I think this YKTTW could use some extra examples anyway, but I like the version you mentioned; I agree, it seems like a variation of Type I.
  • June 1, 2013
    Chabal2
    • Lucky Luke has the Chester, Chester, Chester & Chester law firm. When he's asked which one he has an appointment with, he replies "the last one, I think".
    • Marshall, Carter & Dark from the SCP Foundation isn't really a law firm, but they give off this vibe (they supply dangerous artifacts to the rich and bored, artifacts the SCP would rather be kept safely away).

  • June 1, 2013
    DracMonster

    Maybe call it Pun Pun And Wordplay, the first two names are often double for some reason.
  • June 1, 2013
    StarSword
    Type Labels Are Not Examples. Type labels removed.
  • June 1, 2013
    crazysamaritan
    You don't need to make a list of the ways "law firm names" can be done, because each one of your "variants" is already a trope.

    However, "Law firms are comprised of two or more names" is definitely a trope, where "Statler Brothers Law Firm" would be an aversion. Instead of re-listing the types of lists we already have as trope pages, you just need to link to the index of list tropes.

    There's only one problem which needs to be fixed.... The Last Of These Is Not Like The Others is the closest to an index of list tropes that we have 0.o -So that needs to be taken care of in another YKTTW. I'll get to work on that and tell you the index name later. For now, just reduce the description list to a couple of trope lists.
  • June 1, 2013
    Thebiguglyalien
  • June 1, 2013
    spacemarine50
    Spongebob Squarepants: Law firm is Curly, Combover, and Bald. And yes, the guys actually have these hairstyles
  • June 1, 2013
    sunlitgarden
    I know there's one of these in the default starting town in The Oregon Trail II, but due to my computer being too new I've had trouble getting it to work so I don't know if I can check the exact name.
  • OT I know, but I take it you're operating on Windows 7 or 8? I have 7, and literally everything that was made beforehand is absolutely incompatible with it, including old games, screensavers, software, among other things, which... doesn't make sense, they were compatible with other new versions up till then.

    Okay, back on topic now...
  • June 1, 2013
    crazysamaritan
    The laconic is useless now, and I liked "Law offices of Lawyer, Attorney, and Additional" better.
  • June 1, 2013
    Generality
    The standard form of the joke, as far as I know, is "Dewey, Cheatam and Howe" or a variant of such. The wikipedia page gives a number of examples for that joke alone.
  • Alright, let's be democratic, we'll take a vote on it...

    Who prefers "The Law Firm of Lawyer, Attorney, and Whatever", and who prefers "The Law Firm of Pun, Pun, and Wordplay"?

    Come to think of it, based on the previously mentioned Wikipedia article, I wonder if "The Law Firm of Dewey, Cheatam, and Howe" would work even?
  • June 1, 2013
    arbiter099
    I like the current name, but find Dewey, Cheatam, and Howe (Title is sort of clucky to me with "The Law Firm of... in it) a lot funnier. Maybe change current title into the laconic?

    How does, Dewey Cheatam And Howe At Law sound?
  • June 1, 2013
    randomsurfer
    • She Hulk used to work for the law firm of Goodman, Lieber, Kurtzberg, & Holliway. The first three are Mythology Gag names relating to Marvel Comics founder Martin Goodman, Stan Lee (Leiber), and Jack Kirby (Kurtzberg). Of the senior partners, Holliway was the only one we ever saw.
    • In Animal Crackers Captain Spaulding dictates a letter to the law firm of Hungerdunger, Hungerdunger, Hungerdunger, Hungerdunger, and McCormick. At one point he has his secretary read back to him what he's written thus far:
      Jamison: "Honorable Charles H. Hungadunga..."
      Capt. Spaulding: Hungerdunger. Hoong.
      Jamison: Hungerdunger.
      Capt. Spaulding: That's it, Hungerdunger.
      Jamison: [continues reading] "... care of Hungerdunger, Hungerdunger, Hungerdunger, and McCormick."
      Capt. Spaulding: You've left out a Hungerdunger. You left out the main one, too. Thought you could slip one over on me, didn't you, eh?
    • A commercial several years ago had a new secretary for a law firm with a lot of named partners. She starts out answering the phone using all the names but as time goes on and she gets tired, she shortens it down. (Wish I could remember the names, or the product the ad was for.)
    • Another commercial inverts the above, with the new guy starting off stumbling over the names, but as he settles into his role he rattles them off like it's nothing.
  • June 1, 2013
    crazysamaritan
    The name rather depends on the direction you plan to take this trope. Based on the earlier name, and the focus on law firms, I thought the trope was intended to be about fictional law firms. So the name should focus on how law firm names are structured.

    The direction I see this trope going instead is "Punny Name combined with businesses". Which is fine, because there is a severe lack of said names on that trope page as it stands, probably because tropers are assuming it only applies to character names. In that case, the name should focus on the silly ways fictional businesses may be named, and Dewey Cheatem And Howe is already a term used outside this wiki.

    Either way, the description should have links to other tropes, not reiterating what those other tropes are. We want everything crosswicked.
  • Yes, the direction was meant to focus on law firms.

    Like I said, the description needs help badly: I'm up for anybody tweaking it to how it would be better.
  • June 2, 2013
    BearyScary
    Radio
    • On Car Talk, the hosts reference a fake lawfirm by the name of Dewey, Cheatam, and Howe at least once per show.
    I can't remember the exact context of the example, but I do know that it is an example.

    In terms of the trope name, I prefer The Law Firm of Pun, Pun, and Wordplay better, but I feel that there must be a way of smoothing the name over to improve it.
  • June 2, 2013
    glisglis
    Animal Crackers isn't a stageplay, it's actually a film. I think the trope codifier here is Dewey, Cheatam and Howe.
  • June 2, 2013
    robinjohnson
    Magazines
    • Private Eye often refers to Messrs Sue, Grabbit & Runne.

    Video Games
    • The manual for Frontier: Elite II opens with a legal letter informing the player that they have inherited a spaceship. The name of the law firm is Sue, Cripple & Sneer.

    Theatre
    • The Importance Of Being Earnest makes passing mention of a law firm called Markby, Markby and Markby. Lady Bracknell comments that the Markbys are held in high esteem for their profession - one of them is even occasionally invited to dinner parties.
  • June 2, 2013
    robinjohnson
  • June 2, 2013
    Prfnoff
    @glisglis: Animal Crackers was a stageplay first. So there.

    Actually, in the script of the play, the firm is named "Vasserschlagel, Vasserschlegel, Vasserschlugel, and McCormick," but the joke is otherwise the same.

    While on the subject of the Marx Brothers, Groucho and Chico Marx had a radio show about a small law firm, Flywheel, Shyster, and Flywheel.
  • June 2, 2013
    UltramarineAlizarin
    Video Games
    • Leisure Suit Larry III features the law firm "Dewey, Cheatem & Howe". He meets with Suzi Cheatem to file for divorce (and attempt to seduce her, adding another layer to the "cheat" pun).
  • June 2, 2013
    arromdee
    How about just Punny Named Lawfirm without the &?
  • June 2, 2013
    1810072342
    Literature: The Pure Dead Magic series (at least, I think that's the official title. Anyone know what it actually is?) has one of the classic law firm puns of Sue, Grabbit and Run. This is then taken further when Ludo Grabbit of the firm becomes a supporting member of the cast.
  • Even for those who prefered "The Law Firm of Lawyer, Attorney, and Whatever", that turns out to have too many characters in the title anyway.

    Punny Named Lawfirm is a consideration, not quite as specific, but it could possibly work.

    It's amusing, I've started YKTT Ws before that apparently needed better titles, but I think this is the first one I've started where there's been almost as many title suggestions as there are examples.
  • June 2, 2013
    BlackMageJ
    Radio: In one episode of Old Harrys Game, Satan pretends to be a lawyer from the firm of Bulstrode, Bulstrode and Thirdname.
  • June 2, 2013
    tardigrade
    In season 2 of The Wire, a prank involving a paternity lawsuit involves a telephone call from "Shyster, Shyster & Shyster"
  • June 2, 2013
    Hodor
    • In Vanity Fair, there is some ambiguity as to whether Villain Protagonist Becky Sharp murdered her husband Joss for insurance money. When the solicitors from his insurance company raise suspicions, she sends in her own solicitors from the film of Burke, Thurtell, and Hayes- all named after infamous murderers.
  • June 2, 2013
    DracMonster
    I suppose Fun With Law Firm Names would encompass everything properly. Personally I'd still rather keep the current title though.

    Anyway, have a hat.
  • Thanks a lot DracMonster!
  • June 2, 2013
    TheAnswer
    In one episode of Adventures In Odyssey, Edwin Blackgard is visited by a lawyer from the firm: Dunkey, Dunkey, Dunkey, and Mc Cormic.
  • June 2, 2013
    crazysamaritan
    Two possible tropes. One laconic, starting description, and example for each. Note that the two examples do not belong under the same trope, because one isn't a joke, and the other isn't a law firm.

    • "Law firms in fiction have at least two names" - In Real Life, law firms are named after some of the senior members of the firm. Because of that, fictional versions make the audience assume that the firm has at least as many characters as names. In Fiction, this can either be taken seriously, or Played For Laughs as the creator makes jokes out of each name, or all the names put together. The name always appears in list form, never as "The law offices of Southern San Diego".
      • In Suits, the main character goes to work for a firm named Pearson Hardman, lawyers so famous, they don't even need to state their business is a law firm.
    • "Business with a Punny Name" - Punny Names aren't limited to just characters, especially when you can string several names together to create both a business name and a joke. The Trope Codifier is "Dewey, Cheatem, & Howe". Which can be read several ways ("Do we cheat them? And how!" or "How do we cheat them?"). You'll find this is often used with law offices, because of the tendency to name the firm after people in the office.
  • June 2, 2013
    dvorak
    I think this was from a "Funny Signs" book, but "Duey, Cheatum, & Howe" law.
  • June 2, 2013
    sunlitgarden
    Re: Oregon Trail II from before, I actually have 64-bit Vista (I know, I know, but I got this computer before 7 came out.) Many older games work on 32-bit Vista, but not 64-bit, for technical reasons that are beyond my scope of knowledge.

    But, I managed to find the sign I was thinking of on a Let's Play video and it turns out it's just the standard Dewey, Cheatum & Howe.
  • June 3, 2013
    TooBah
    NM, I see people have covered my input.
  • June 3, 2013
    OmarKarindu
    Live-Action TV
    • A subplot in the fourth season of Arrested Development involves the law firm of Feinstein, Feinstein, Feinstein, ad Feinstein.
  • June 3, 2013
    Duncan
    • In Robert Anton Wilson's The Illuminatus Trilogy, there is mention of an Illuminati front organization which pretends to be a law firm called "Washington, Weishaupt, Budweiser and Keif".
      "Later, for some reason I was never told, they changed the name to Ruly, Kempt, Sheveled and Couth, and then to Weery, Stale, Flatt, and Profitable"
    • An old joke about Ted Kennedy being defended in the Chappaquidick incident by the infamous law firm of "Winer, Diner, Dicker and Dunker".
  • June 3, 2013
    TonyG
    • The Simpsons episode "Bart the Fink" features the lawfirm of Dewey, Cheatham, Howe and Weissman.
      • In "Black Eyes, Please", Ned wants Homer to punch him in the eye as retribution from Ned punching him earlier, and this exchange occurs.
      Ned: Homer, if you punch me, we'll be even according to Exodus, Leviticus and Matthew.
      Homer: So you hired a lawfirm, eh?
    • Thirty Rock: Tracy hires a lawyer from Dewey, Cheatum and Livingson.
  • June 11, 2013
    RandomSurfer
    Car Talk's Dewey Cheetam & Howe is usually referenced at the end of the show, along with many other punny names such as statistician Marge Innovera and customer care representative Haywood Jabuzoff. DC&H is actually their production company.

    Groucho & Chico's radio show Flywheel, Shyster & Flywheel was originally called Beagle, Shyster & Beagle but an attorny actually named Beagle threatened to sue so Beagle "went back to his maiden name" Flywheel. (Both Beagles, and both Flywheels, in the company name are Groucho. We never meed Shyster.)
  • June 12, 2013
    peccantis
  • I guess if another troper thirds it, I'll rename it again, even though I personally don't particularly care for it.
  • June 12, 2013
    Folamh3
    • The father of one of Ross's friends in the Ross O Carroll Kelly series of books is a partner in a law firm named Hook, Lyon and Sinker.
  • June 12, 2013
    kiukiuclk
    The only thing I don't like is the dual pun in the name. Seems like we should be able to come up with a third. The description should mention Punny Name also I would think.

    How about The Law Firm of Gag, Pun, and Wordplay ?

    The Law Firm of Puny, Richards, and Wordplay?
  • June 13, 2013
    aurora369
    The Hobbit offers us Messrs Grubb, Grubb and Burrowes, a notary firm that grubbed Bilbo's burrow and was selling it.
  • June 13, 2013
    Omeganian
    The Salvation War has "the law firm of Bleedum, Grabbit and Runne".
  • June 13, 2013
    robinjohnson
    ^^^ The reason for the two Puns is that duplicate names are a common feature of fictional lawfirm names.

    I just think starting with "The Law Firm of" makes the title a mouthful. If one of the names was Lawfirm it could be shorter and sorta self-demonstrating. Or something like Pun Pun And Wordplay LLP - is LLP as a suffix to lawfirm names understood internationally, or is there an equivalent that is?
  • June 13, 2013
    Paradisesnake
    Was there some reason why we can't use that Dewey Cheatam And Howe that's mentioned in the description? It's punny, descriptive and sounds good enough.
  • @ robinjohnson You're right, that's pretty much why "Pun, Pun, and Wordplay" worked better, a number of the examples point to that. I can kind of see where you're coming from in your concern that the title is a bit wordy, though it is specific and makes sense. Pun, Pun, and Wordplay LLP could work, and you say it's understood internationally as a suffix to lawfirm names, but how many of your average joes recognize that?

    @Paradisesnake The problem is we're no longer allowed to use stock phrases/jokes/names in titles anymore.

    And yay, five hats, the first time I've achieved that with a YKKTW! Now if we could only agree on a title/name, we could launch it.
  • June 13, 2013
    robinjohnson
    ^ I don't know whether LLP is likely to be understood internationally or not. I would actually suspect not.
  • Going back through the comments, here's what we have as far as "votes" go for the various different suggested names (not counting my own)...

    • The Lawfirm of Attorney, Lawyer, and Whatever - 1
    • The Lawfirm of Pun, Pun, and Wordplay - 3
    • Dewey, Cheatam, and Howe at Law - 1
    • Punny, Named, & Lawfirm - 1
    • Punny Named Lawfirm - 1
    • Fun With Lawfirm Names - 2
    • The Lawfirm of Gag, Pun, and Wordplay - 1
    • The Lawfirm of Puny, Richards, and Wordplay - 1
    • Pun, Pun, and Wordplay LLP - 1

    The current name seems to be the most popular, with Fun With Lawfirm Names trailing in second.
  • June 14, 2013
    robinjohnson
    ^ If Dewey Cheatham And Howe At Law is ok, then surely Dewey Cheatham And Howe is. I could get behind the latter.
  • It was a suggestion thrown into the mix, the problem is, again, TV Tropes have this rule that we're no longer allowed to use stock phrases or similar in titles anymore.

    Unless Star Sword or someone else can give an okay, I could give a vote to a title along those lines.
  • June 14, 2013
    crazysamaritan
    You're citing No New Stock Phrases, but missing that Dewey Cheatham And Howe is more about the three names than it is a statement made by people. The key thing that separates this trope name from stock phrase is a "line of personal (in-character) dialogue."

    Dewey Cheatham And Howe is not a line of dialogue, but a name, and this trope is about naming, in a way that adding "at law" or "the lawfirm of" doesn't modify, and is more evocative than Gag Pun And Wordplay, or Pun Pun And Wordplay. (I still maintain that two tropes are at play here, but I've been ignored.)
  • You said it was a trope for lawfirm names, and a trope for businesses with punny names; any non lawfirm examples have been removed from the description.
  • June 16, 2013
    Astaroth
    I think a law-firm called Sly, Steele & Trickum may have appeared in Rugrats at some point or another, can anyone confirm this/provide more details?
  • June 16, 2013
    JonnyB
    The recent Three Stooges film had Larry and Curly looking for a lawyer; on the floor of the building they were looking in, they see a variety of punny tenants' names such as "Proba, Keister & Wince, Proctologists" before arriving at the law offices of "Kickem, Harter & Indagroyne".
  • June 22, 2013
    Paradisesnake
    Laconic needs help. It's supposed to explain the basic idea of the trope. Simply writing Exactly What It Says On The Tin isn't enough.
  • Is it even really necessary at this point? It's on the verge of being launched anyway, we're just all trying to settle and agree on a name.
  • June 23, 2013
    Trueman001
    ^^^ The Three Stooges example is slightly badly worded; "recent" as compared to when? That movie will no longer be "recent" in a year or two...

    (Film)
    • In the late 1960s or early 1970s, there was a movie called Getting Straight whose posters all had taglines of the form "If you think <X>... you need Getting Straight." One of them was "If you think Simon And Garfunkel are a firm of solicitors..."

    (Literature)

  • June 23, 2013
    Paradisesnake
    ^^ The laconic isn't just something for the work phase. It keeps on existing after the trope is launched, and thus it should be written properly.
  • June 24, 2013
    Arivne
    ^^ Changed "recent" to "2012" in The Three Stooges example because Examples Are Not Recent.

    ^ ^^^ Changed the Laconic to be more descriptive.
  • June 24, 2013
    Frank75
    ^^^ Three members? What about the fourth Boot?
  • June 24, 2013
    Trueman001
    ^That indeed is the point; the firm actually consisted of three Bootses.
  • June 25, 2013
    Trueman001
    Rewording my last example.

    (Literature)
  • So where do we currently stand on the name? So far, that's still really the only issue that's keeping this from being launched.
  • June 25, 2013
    DaibhidC
    Comics
  • June 25, 2013
    Paradisesnake
    ^^ Maybe put up a crowner?
  • I haven't been here too long; what exactly is a crowner and how does it work?
  • June 26, 2013
    Paradisesnake
    ^ Here you go: How Crowners Work.
  • June 26, 2013
    spacemarine50
    ^ Seems like I can't vote at all.
  • June 28, 2013
    JonnyB
    Hee Haw had Cletus Biggs of "Biggs, Shy & Stir", Kornfield Kounty's most honorable law firm".
  • @ spacemarine50 Well... I... really don't know how to fix that... :|
  • ^^^^ Fixed
  • Not a lot of voting activity thusfar, but at the moment, it appears the direction of the voting is strongly indiciating that popular opinion is that we will, indeed, have to change the name.
  • July 2, 2013
    abloke
    Also in Private Eye, the New York-based Shyster, Shyster & Kruk has been mentioned at least once.
  • Well, most people are voting to change the name, so since Fun With Law Firmnames is the next most suggested name, should we settle on that then?
  • Bumpity-bump-bump bumpity-bump.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=qmgp5u68bp9ffb08te600yu2&trope=TheLawFirmOfPunPunAndWordplay