Created By: Glendleton on November 16, 2012 Last Edited By: Glendleton on November 18, 2012
Nuked

Myth Decision Procedure

Glenn's Razor

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Trope
In any conceivable situation in fiction, if a myth or legend is recounted AND it pertains to the current problem experienced by the characters or protagonists, then the overwhelming impetus of plot necessitates it's veracity.

  • Often manifested as dramatic or situational irony.
  • Particularly common in the horror genre.

Examples:

Film:

-Blair Witch Project: Filmmaker students underestimate legend of the Blair Witch. PROVED WRONG

-Troll Hunter: Filmmaker students doubt existence of trolls asserted by Hans. PROVED WRONG

-Hatchet: Tourists doubt the Victor Crowley legend. PROVED WRONG

-Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade: Jones: I've heard this bed time story before. (in response to myth of the Holy Grail) PROVED WRONG

-Venom: Youths doubt the efficacy of voodoo rituals and lore. PROVED WRONG

-Cat People: Love interest of Serbian protagonist doubts the legends of her people and inadvertently helps instigate the revelation of its truth. PROVED WRONG

-The Mummy: Evelyn carelessly neglects the mythology surrounding the Book of the Dead. PROVED WRONG

-Prince of Darkness: Undergraduate students doubt the claims of the priest. "This priest is looney tunes..." PROVEN WRONG

-Clawed: The Legend of Sasquatch: Protagonists doubt the existence of Sasquatch. PROVED WRONG

-Princess Mononoke: Lady Eboshi doubts the consequences of the legend surrounding the decapitation of the Great Forest Spirit. PROVED WRONG

-Paranormal Activity (1-4): Without fail, a protagonist in each film, usually male, severely doubts the existence of demons, despite corroboration by mediums and female characters. PROVED WRONG

-The Ring: Male friend of protagonist ignores the fatal notoriety surrounding the tape. PROVED WRONG

-Children of the Corn: Adults ignore assertions from children that the corn took the town's adults. PROVED WRONG

-The Evil Dead: Group of friends ignore myths of Indian burial ground and tamper with Necronomicon. PROVED WRONG

-1408: Cusack's dogmatically rational character ignores supernatural infamy of haunted hotel room. PROVED WRONG

Television Shows:

-Scooby-Doo: Though their skepticism usually saves them, in the instance of the Loch Ness monster, it led them to doubt the legend. PROVED WRONG

-Phineas & Ferb: Candice doubts the existence of the Lake nose monster. PROVED WRONG

-Samurai Jack: Viking overlord initially doubts the power of the "peerless warrior" portion of the Three Archers legend. PROVED WRONG

-Spongebob Squarepants: Sandy doubts the "mythological" proportions of the Alaskan Bull Worm. PROVED WRONG

Literature:

-Dracula: Johnathan Harker doubts the efficacy of local Transylvanian folklore (i.e. vampirism). PROVED VERY WRONG

-Edge Chronicles: Characters doubt the Legend of the Gloamgoazer. PROVED WRONG

-Sleepy Hollow: Ichabod Crane doubts the veracity of the Sleepy Hollow legend. PROVED WRONG

Community Feedback Replies: 15
  • November 16, 2012
    Stratadrake
    I don't get it. Can you explain more? "Glenn's razor" sounds like you're just pulling some words out of thin air - I checked Google but only found 34 results (and no, not those 34) for it.
  • November 16, 2012
    Glendleton
    Oh it was, its an eponym I coined for this phenomenon.
  • November 16, 2012
    rodneyAnonymous
    What phenomenon? Don't understand either.
  • November 16, 2012
    Glendleton
    The literary pattern pointed out above, that is the tendency for myths or legends (that are pertinent to characters) in fiction to be always true. Though this might seem redundant especially for movies or books named after the legend or myth, its nonetheless a humorous observation of fiction's myth truth functions.
  • November 16, 2012
    rodneyAnonymous
    If I find an explanation confusing, saying "I explained that" probably isn't going to clear up the confusion. Please rephrase. Still don't get it. (Obviously vampires are going to exist in a story about vampires, so am assuming you don't mean that...)

    Also please use plain English, that writing style comes off as Sesquipedalian Loquaciousness.
  • November 16, 2012
    Glendleton
    In clearer terms, myths in fiction are almost invariably true. There seems to be a motif where characters in stories often encounter myths or legends which they generally disregard out of rationality. More often than not, they are proven wrong by dire circumstances. Thus, as audience, you can almost always outright assume that its true. Does that clarify any?
  • November 16, 2012
    Bisected8
    We already have All Myths Are True....
  • November 17, 2012
    MorganWick
  • November 17, 2012
    StarSword
    This could be a subtrope of all three of those...
  • November 17, 2012
    rodneyAnonymous
    In what sense is it distinct?
  • November 17, 2012
    HeartOfAnAstronaut
    EDIT: What is All Myths Are True actually supposed to be? I thought it was "King Arthur, Norse gods, the Loch Ness Monster and Voodoo spirits ARE ALL REAL IN THE SAME STORY" but the repair shop thread says otherwise?

    "Apparently, All Myths Are True has been misinterpreted as "real world myths are used in a work." instead of "If a Myth is mentioned In-Universe, it will be true", and thus, have examples that would fit better in Crossover Cosmology."
  • November 17, 2012
    Stratadrake
    In regards to the title, never just try to coin a fancy new term out of thin air. It never works.

    Also, last I heard All Myths Are True was a mess of mythical proportions.

    And we also have The Legend Of Chekhov for "any myth mentioned in a story will be a Chekhovs Gun later". Not seeing a distinction. Going once?
  • November 18, 2012
    MorganWick
    ^^That interpretation is not agreed to by everyone in the thread, with Troacctid (starting on page 2) being the foremost defendant of what you thought it was, the main problem being how to distinguish it from Fantasy Kitchen Sink. Here's my input.
  • November 18, 2012
    WeAreAllKosh
    Live-Action TV

    Averted in Babylon 5's episode "A Late Delivery From Avalon"--an arrival on the Babylon 5 station claims to be King Arthur, brought back among humanity after a long hiatus, at a time "he was needed most" in his words. There is actual discussion among the main characters as to whether this could be true, since there was already a known case where the Vorlons did abduct a historical figure and used him to do their bidding in other times ( "Comes the Inquisitor"). But it turns out he was from the present time, suffering trauma-induced delusion from being the officer who fired the first shot that started the Earth-Minbari War years ago.
  • November 18, 2012
    HeartOfAnAstronaut
    It sounds like this is The Legend Of Chekhov.

    Apologies if bringing up the All Myths Are True mess confused the issue. It confused me.

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